Magic Beach - Stage 1 Literacy
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Magic Beach - Stage 1 Literacy
This topic involves relevant, engaging and appropriate online digital resources that can be used when teaching about Literacy in a Stage 1 classroom. Relevant English Outcome: Students draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies EN1-4A.  Subject Matter/ Indicator: use comprehension strategies to build literal and inferred meaning and begin to analyse texts by drawing on growing knowledge of context, language and visual features and print and multimodal text structures (ACELY1660, ACELY1670)
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Magic Beach - Learning Activities

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Anna Wilkinson's insight:

This official document contains invaluable teaching ideas that can contribute to a unit of work using the Magic Beach picture book. Curriculum Support is an excellent website for teachers as it relates a range of syllabus outcomes across KLAs. This is particularly important when using technology as a teacher needs to consider the content of what is taught and appropriate pedagogy (Mishra & Koehler, 2006). I believe using drama before reading the story is a wonderfully engaging activity for children. This resource suggest an improvising activity where students act out beach activities such as jog along the sand, collect shells, build a sand castle, dig for treasure, patrol the beach, fly like seagulls etc. I particularly liked the use of freeze frames as the teacher narrated the story, which could be used in conjunction with the video scooped on this page! This could also provide a springboard into descriptive language. Additionally, I would like to instruct students to mime specific adjectives as the story is read to reinforce their meaning and increase engagement.  

 

References:

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. The Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017-1054. 

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Magic Beach - YouTube

A reading of my favourite children's story book - Magic Beach by Alison Lester.
Anna Wilkinson's insight:

This is a great reading of the Magic Beach. I have linked this video to my IWB, for the students to listen to and interact with. As students are listening to the story for the first time they would fold their arms if they heard an adjective and then discuss what they imagined as the story was being told. The mere use of voice prevents cognitive overload as students can listen to the story and focus on the descriptive words without being distracted by the pictures. Mayer and Moreno (2002) helpfully outline a framework which can be used to analyse computer based multimedia learning aids. Mayer & Moreno (2002) insist, “a major premise in cognitive load theory is that instructional messages should be designed in ways that minimize the chances of overloading the learner's cognitive system". Additionally, it is identified that students learn better from narration than on screen text (Mayer & Moreno, 2002). Therefore, this resource has been perfectly constructed to help students listen to the words in the story and use their imaginations rather than trying to focus on visual images, text and voice. However, students can learn better with the accompaniment of images with narration (Mayer & Moreno, 2002). Thus, the unit will provide students future opportunities to gain understanding from the pictures as well as the written text. However, this resource will be helpfully used to introduce the students to the language used by Alison Lestor in the marvellous story.

 

 

Reference:

Mayer, R., & Moreno, R. (2002). Aids to computer-based multimedia learning. Learning and Instruction 12, 107–119.

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Write About This

Write About This | Magic Beach - Stage 1 Literacy | Scoop.it
Write About This is an outstanding app for teaching and practicing writing skills. It’s great for a very wide range of ages and abilities, and will provide hours and hours of productive practice....
Anna Wilkinson's insight:

In an increasingly technological world, the numbers of apps has escalated, including the amount of educational apps. Teachers need to critically analyse such resources (Gonsalves, 2008) before applying to a classroom context. Certain websites have been created to gather useful resources, including Scoop it! However, this website I have scooped provided many insightful comments about educational apps, specifically for teachers. This website gave me helpful comments about the use of the app "Write about this". The positive feedback and inspirational ideas on this website has lead to the use of this app as part of literacy unit. In this lesson I would use the app to write a story using adjectives, with the additional feature of visual images and the ability to add a voice recording. The benefit of this app, as outlined on this website, is the engagement with visual images. Students in stage 1 need to develop visual literacy skills (Board of Studies, 2012). How teachers achieve this learning outcome is difficult as children are flooded with visual images from a range of technological devices. Nevertheless, this app only allows one image for children to analyse, therefore creating deep thinking and a springboard into writing (Winch et al, 2010).

 

References:

 

Board of Studies. (2012). English Syllabus.

 

Gonsalves, A., (2008) Despite The Internet Google Generation Lacks Analytical Skills. Information week. http://www.informationweek.com/news/inte rnet/search/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=20 5901358. (Retrieved on December 2, 2011).

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2001). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (2nd ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford Univer- sity Press.

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