Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
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Six blended learning models | eSchool News | eSchool News

Learn about the six most common blended learning models students use to learn at their own pace and explore academic interests.
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Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
Resources for Online and Blended Learning
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Adobe Generation Professional: Animation for the Classroom | Adobe Education Exchange

Adobe Generation Professional: Animation for the Classroom | Adobe Education Exchange | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Course Overview

This five-week course focuses on the deceptively simple art of animation. Educators create a number of different types of digital animations using the latest Adobe tools. Throughout the process, participants explore best practices for integrating digital media into your classroom. All the content you produce can be used to model good practices within your own university, college or school. Each week of the course will introduce you to a new theme and an industry expert from the world of digital animation. As a result, you’ll become more confident with cutting-edge digital tools, more effective as a teacher, and more of an inspiration to your students.

We will be exploring Adobe Animate, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects.
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The Scope of edX | Technology and Learning

The Scope of edX | Technology and Learning | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Even though we may hear less about MOOCs than we once did, that does not mean that we should not pay attention to where this movement is going. Let me share some edX numbers that blew my mind: There are 8.3 million (unique) lifelong learners on the edX platform. Between 2012, when edX started, and today - there have been 27 million course enrollments. Over 1,000 courses have been offered. There have been over 2,300 faculty and staff that have taught on edX. Over 840,000 certificates have been earned by edX learners. EdX has over 100 schools, institutes and organizations in the Consortium creating open online courses
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Digital Public Library of America

Digital Public Library of America | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Developers make apps that use the library’s data in many different ways


The vision of a national digital library has been circulating among librarians, scholars, educators, and private industry representatives since the early 1990s. Efforts led by a range of organizations, including the Library of Congress, HathiTrust, and the Internet Archive, have successfully built resources that provide books, images, historic records, and audiovisual materials to anyone with Internet access. Many universities, public libraries, and other public-spirited organizations have digitized materials, but these digital collections often exist in silos. The DPLA brings these different viewpoints, experiences, and collections together in a single platform and portal, providing open and coherent access to our society’s digitized cultural heritage. The DPLA planning process began in October 2010 at a meeting in Cambridge, MA. During this meeting, 40 leaders from libraries, foundations, academia, and technology projects agreed to work together to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.” In December 2010, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, generously supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, convened leading experts in libraries, technology, law, and education to begin work on this ambitious project. A two-year process of intense grassroots community organization, beginning in October 2011 and hosted at the Berkman Center, brought together hundreds of public and research librarians, innovators, digital humanists, and other volunteers—organized into six workstreams and led by a distinguished Steering Committee—helped to scope, design, and construct the DPLA. The DPLA is led now by Executive Director Dan Cohen and guided by a Board of Directors comprised of leading public and research librarians, technologists, intellectual property scholars, and business experts from around the country. Based in Boston in the historic Boston Public Library, DPLA has grown from an initial staff of four to nearly ten, including an in-house technical team. To read more about the DPLA team, visit our our staff page.

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Questions for the Effective & Efficient Educator

Questions for the Effective & Efficient Educator | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
1. Do you say “my” class or “our” class?

2. Do you utter, “It is so very good to see you,” while your tone and body posture scream, “I can’t wait to go home”?

3. If students were to construct a statue in your honor, would it portray you seated at your desk, or would the artistic task be impossible to complete due to your lack of stillness that originates from an incessant energy and an undeniable passion for teaching?

4. If a movie were being made about your teaching practices and your classes, what actor/actress would play your role? What’s the title? Would any tickets be sold?

5. Do you remember to snack and hydrate throughout the day so your blood-sugar levels do not fluctuate and cause your students to wonder what alien stole your body?

6. Do you slow down, pause for reflection, and focus on the important details, or is the speed of your teaching practices creating a collision?

7. Do you multi-task while speaking with students, or do you pause your present activity, make eye contact, and engage in a meaningful conversation that leads to collective inspiration and understanding?

8. Could your “supplies needed” list easily be used for a 1960’s classroom, or does it appear you are preparing for students like Adora Svitak, Thomas Suarez, Jack Andraka, Richard Turere, or any other brilliant students? Click here (and here) to see examples of two 21st Century lists.

9. Is humor a mainstay in your classes?
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7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools

7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
There’s a growing consensus among students, parents, teachers and education leaders that the current education system isn’t appropriately preparing young people for the future. Many districts are looking toward technology to patch the disconnect, but several recent reports indicate that technology alone cannot fix the ailing system.

High-quality teachers are essential to learning environments that consider each student as a unique, individual learner, but very few schools have good systems in place to support teachers learning together and sharing their expertise.

‘I’ve seen teachers support each other to develop the agency, confidence and skills in a very short time to do some remarkable things.’
Barnett Berry
Given the need for change felt by many involved in education, there may be a unique opening right now to invest in teacher leadership as a way forward. Founder and CEO of the Center for Teaching Quality, Barnett Berry, recently published a report summarizing 30 years of research on best practices to empower teachers to lead and improve practice. He says three shifts in policy and leadership culture may help move these efforts forward:

New types of assessment are gaining ground. Several states are piloting performance-based assessments to replace standardized testing.
Exemplars in the business community are now promoting flat organizational structures, where employees work in smaller teams and have more voice and power over how they work.
Teachers are more networked than ever before, providing a unique opportunity to share and spread good teaching practice.
“I’ve been around for a long time and I’ve seen teachers support each other to develop the agency, confidence and skills in a very short time to do some remarkable things,” Berry said. The most clear examples
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Beginning Spanish by PBS LearningMedia on iBooks

Read a free sample or buy Beginning Spanish by PBS LearningMedia. You can read this book with iBooks on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac.
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Farmers Quit Corn; Grow Solar Power

Farmers Quit Corn; Grow Solar Power | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
One of the arguments used against solar power deployment is the amount of space needed for all of those solar panels. Although one study has shown that 0.6 percent of all land in the U.S. would be needed to completely electrify the country, the fight still goes on, even as solar and wind power technologies continue to increase in efficiency while decreasing in costs.

The fight is also occurring in counties across the U.S., as landowners and farmers seek new ways to generate revenue. Most of rural America has missed out on the economic revival that has conjoined technology and urbanization in many cities, so these counties are also seeking new ways to generate tax revenues. Farmers, of course, have also taken a hit due to the ongoing slump in global commodities.

The controversy over farmers having the right to sign contract with solar and wind power companies is now taking center stage in North Carolina.

The combination of the state’s Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (REPS), which requires utilities operating in the state to generate some electricity from renewables, along with its booming tech culture, has turned the Tar Heel State into a solar powerhouse. In fact, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) says North Carolina ranks third in the nation amongst U.S. states in total solar capacity. Last year, the installation of over 1,100 megawatts of solar power placed North Carolina in second nationally in new solar generation.
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one study has shown that {only} 0.6 percent of all land in the U.S. would be needed to completely electrify the country
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CTE Makeover Challenge

CTE Makeover Challenge | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Education invites schools to enter the CTE Makeover Challenge! Submit a design for a makerspace in your school that will strengthen next-generation career and technical skills: www.ctemakeoverchallenge.com
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Best Infographic Design Apps and Websites

Best Infographic Design Apps and Websites | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Infographics are a way to convey a lot of complex information relatively quickly and engagingly. These apps and websites for creating and designing infographics can help both teachers and students communicate their ideas and demonstrate learning, stretching visual an

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Think student media courses and stat courses
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Trapped in the Community College Remedial Maze

Trapped in the Community College Remedial Maze | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

A majority of students with A and B grade point averages in high school still require developmental education at the community-college level, raising new questions about the skill level of incoming college students and the ways institutions measure their abilities. This is especially worrisome for students of color given that half of Hispanic college students and nearly a third of black college students start their higher-education paths at community colleges.

According to a new report that looked at a survey of 70,000 community-college students, 40 percent of students who said they averaged an A in high school reported that they needed a developmental course in at least one subject. Students with A- or B+ averages said they needed a brush-up course more than 50 percent of the time, and those with B averages required such a course nearly 60 percent of the time. Combined, these three levels of achievement accounted for 57 percent of the community-college students who were asked this question in the survey.  

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Learning to Learn

Learning to Learn | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, “The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.”

I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.

Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).

Aspiration
It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.

Think about the last time your company adopted a new approach—overhauled a reporting system, replaced a CRM platform, revamped the supply chain. Were you eager to go along? I doubt it. Your initial response was probably to justify not learning. (It will take too long. The old way works just fine for me. I bet it’s just a flash in the pan.) When confronted with new learning, this is often our first roadblock: We focus on the negative and unconsciously reinforce our lack of aspiration.

When we do want to learn something, we focus on the positive—what we’ll gain from learning it—and envision a happy future in which we’re reaping those rewards. That propels us into action. Researchers have found that shifting your focus from challenges to benefits is a good way to increase your aspiration to do initially unappealing things. For example, when Nicole Detling, a psychologist at the University of Utah, encouraged aerialists and speed skaters to picture themselves benefiting from a particular skill, they were much more motivated to practice it.
A few years ago I coached a CMO who was hesitant to learn about big data. Even though most of his peers were becoming converts, he’d convinced himself that he didn’t have the time to get into it and that it wouldn’t be that important to his industry. I finally realized that this was an aspiration problem and encouraged him to think of ways that getting up to speed on data-driven marketing could help him personally. He acknowledged that it would be useful to know more about how various segments of his customer base were responding to his team’s online advertising and in-store marketing campaigns. I then invited him to imagine the situation he’d be in a year later if he was getting that data. He started to show some excitement, saying, “We would be testing different approaches simultaneously, both in-store and online; we’d have good, solid information about which ones were working and for whom; and we could save a lot of time and money by jettisoning the less effective approaches faster.” I could almost feel his aspiration rising. Within a few months he’d hired a data analytics expert, made a point of learning from her on a daily basis, and begun to rethink key campaigns in light of his new perspective and skills.

Self-Awareness
Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.” Clearly, almost half were wrong—many extremely so—and their self-deception surely diminished any appetite for development. Only 6% of respondents saw themselves as having a lot to learn about being an effective teacher.

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration.


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The newest fad in education — and why some teachers find it troubling

The newest fad in education — and why some teachers find it troubling | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
It’s called “competency-based learning” and its the newest thing in education. What is it? Who likes it? Who doesn’t and why?

On its face, competency-based learning sounds good. Students learn material and move on when they have mastered the material, going at their own pace. But how exactly do students get this sort of education and what are the consequences? Veteran educator Anthony Cody writes in the following primer that competency-based education is fundamentally a way to push kids onto computers to learn — and to take test after test to prove their “competencies.”

Cody worked in high-poverty schools of Oakland, California, for 24 years, 18 of them as a middle school science teacher. He was one of the organizers of the Save Our Schools March in Washington, D.C. in 2011, and he is a founding member of the nonprofit Network for Public Education. A graduate of the University of California Berkeley and San Jose State University, he now lives in Mendocino County, California. This appeared on his worthwhile Living in Dialogue blog, and he gave me permission to republish it.

 

By Anthony Cody

We have been badgered for the past 14 years by reformers insisting on the fierce urgency of change, and they have had their way — twice! First, seven years of the test-centric No Child Left Behind, followed by the past seven years of Race to the Top, and now the “next generation” of tests, which were promised to be “smarter,” computer-adapted, and deliver results more quickly. None of it worked. Scores on the independent National Assessment of Educational Progress tests are flat or down. The SBAC and PARCC Common Core-aligned tests are more difficult without being any “smarter” in telling us about what our students can do. The idea that these tests could somehow promote and measure creativity and critical thinking is debunked. The growing “opt out” movement poses a huge threat to the standardized testing “measure to manage” paradigm.

So what is to be done?

Reinvent the tests once again, using technology. And who better for the job than Tom Vander Ark, formerly of the Gates Foundation, and now associated with a long list of education technology companies. The latest package of solutions is being called “competency-based learning,” and it was featured prominently in the Department of Education’s latest “Testing Action Plan.”

Here is how Vander Ark frames the challenge:

Jobs to be done. To get at the heart of value creation, Clayton Christensen taught us to think about the job to be done. Assessment plays four important roles in school systems:

Inform learning: continuous data feed that informs students, teachers, and parents about the learning process.
Manage matriculation: certify that students have learned enough to move on and ultimately graduate.
Evaluate educators: data to inform the practice and development of educators.
Check quality: dashboard of information about school quality particularly what students know and can do and how fast they are progressing
Initiated in the dark ages of data poverty, state tests were asked to do all these jobs. As political stakes grew, psychometricians and lawyers pushed for validity and reliability and the tests got longer in an attempt to fulfill all four roles.

With so much protest, it may go without saying but the problem with week long summative tests is that they take too much time to administer; they don’t provide rapid and useful feedback for learning and progress management (jobs 1&2); and test preparation rather than preparation for college, careers, and citizenship has become the mission of school. And, with no student benefit many young people don’t try very hard and increasingly opt out.

Note that the source used to define the phrase “jobs to be done” is Clayton Christensen, who has popularized the business concept of “disruptive innovation,” which is the main framework used by “innovators” like Vander Ark.

So what is “competency-based learning”? Here is Vander Ark’s description:

For states ready to embrace personalized and competency-based learning, CompetencyWorks, an online community and resources supported by iNACOL, outlines five components of competency-based education (CBE):

Students advance upon mastery.
Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable objectives that empower students.
Assessment is meaningful and positive learning experience for students.
Students receive timely, differentiated support based on their individual needs.
Outcomes include application of knowledge and development of important skills and dispositions.
The definition sets a high bar by requiring well stated learning targets, powerful learning experiences, better reporting systems, and new rules for matriculation management. It focuses primarily on the first two jobs: student learning and progress management.
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AASA campaign seeks to broaden what college, career readiness means

AASA campaign seeks to broaden what college, career readiness means | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
A new campaign seeks to redefine what it means to be college- and career-ready through a set of indicators that determine success.
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Report Busts Online College Myths, Details Demographics

Report Busts Online College Myths, Details Demographics | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
A survey by Learning House and Aslanian Market Research shows that several online college myths are just that -- and that demographics are changing quickly.
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Survey Reveals Unique Insights to US Students' Attitudes Towards Plagiarism - RefME | Free Reference Generator – Harvard, APA, MLA, Chicago...

Survey Reveals Unique Insights to US Students' Attitudes Towards Plagiarism - RefME | Free Reference Generator – Harvard, APA, MLA, Chicago... | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Citing has long been considered an essential practice in academia, but the increasing availability of information in today’s digital age has fundamentally changed the way some students perceive ‘giving credit where credit is due’. It is therefore crucial that students are well-informed on how and when to cite so that they can avoid being marked down or facing disciplinary action for plagiarism.
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Promising State Policies for Personalized Learning - iNACOL

Promising State Policies for Personalized Learning - iNACOL | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
This report is a valuable resource for state policymakers—whether they are seeking to create conditions in state policy to support personalized learning, moving forward with initiatives to develop personalized learning pilot programs, hosting task forces to explore policy issues and needs, or taking a comprehensive policy approach for supporting advanced personalized learning models. Personalized learning is where instruction is tailored to each student’s strengths, needs, and interests—including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when, and where they learn—to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible.

State policy makers can become partners with practitioners in identifying and removing system barriers to launching and supporting personalizing learning models to ensure each student’s success. In 2016, states have a historic opportunity to create flexibility to enable powerful, personalized learning experiences with the reauthorization of the Federal K-12 education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).
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In personalized learning, instruction is tailored to each student’s strengths, needs, and interests — including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when, and where they learn — to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible. 
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Should we hit the pause button for online and blended learning? - The Hechinger Report

Should we hit the pause button for online and blended learning? - The Hechinger Report | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

by NICHOLE DOBO April 27, 2016
As more schools scurry to bring technology to the classroom, some say dodgy programs are growing like weeds — and they threaten the existence of successful programs.
Too many students in virtual and blended learning schools are performing poorly, according to a new National Education Policy Center report, released last week, by Gary Miron, a professor at Western Michigan University, and Charisse Gulosino, an assistant professor at the University of Memphis. The center’s annual report about online learning for the first time took a look at blended learning, as well. It found that those schools were not doing much better than fully online schools.
“That was the shock for us,” Miron said.
Both fully online (virtual) schools and blended learning schools included in the report tended to fare worse than traditional schools on state assessments of quality. The report described this as a “red flag.”
The report suggests six solutions:
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Slow or halt the growth of virtual and blended schools until the reasons for poor performance are identified and solved.
Write rules to hold schools accountable for results and take action against those who fail.
Require virtual and blended schools to devote more money to instruction. Specify a student-teacher ratio.
Mandate the reporting of data on the teachers hired and on the types of students these schools serve.
Promote new strategies to measure outcomes of these schools, taking into account the “unique characteristics” of the programs.
Support more research to identify which policies create conditions that allow high-quality virtual and blended learning schools to thrive.
Online and blended learning schools account for a small but rapidly growing part of the education ecosphere. The report counts 457 full-time virtual schools and 87 blended learning schools. (These are significantly smaller numbers than those reported by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), an advocacy organization for these types of schools. This may be because of differences in how the groups define virtual and blended-learning schools.)
For-profit schools were singled out in the report as a particularly poor-performing subset of these schools.


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Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses; Middle Class Pays the Most - Education Reform Now

Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses; Middle Class Pays the Most - Education Reform Now | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

http://bit.ly/239VdyY ; Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses;
Middle Class Pays the Most

Lack of Rigor in High Schools Adds to Cost of College

 

More than half a million college freshmen—approximately one in four students who enter college the fall after high school graduation – had to enroll in remedial coursework during their first year of college, costing their families nearly $1.5 billion annually. Forty-five percent of those students came from middle and upper income families, according to “Out of Pocket: The High Cost of Inadequate High Schools and High School Student Achievement on College Affordability http://bit.ly/239VdyY ,”; a new research report from Education Reform Now and Education Post.

Not only does college remediation cut across all income levels, but it’s also common across all types of post-secondary institutions. Nearly half – 43 percent – of remedial students were enrolled in public four-year colleges or private two- and four-year colleges. The other 57 percent were enrolled in public community colleges.

The report’s co-author, Mary Nguyen Barry of Education Reform Now, said, “We have long studied how our country’s elementary and secondary schools have underserved low-income students and students of color, but inadequate academic preparation does not end with students and schools from low-income communities.  The problem is much more widespread. Inadequate high school preparation, as reflected by postsecondary remedial course enrollment, is also a middle class and upper-class problem and has real out-of-pocket financial consequences for all.”

Peter Cunningham, Executive Director of Education Post, which commissioned the study, said, “High schools are not rigorous enough. Higher standards have raised the bar but we need to hold schools accountable for meeting those standards.”

Researchers at Education Reform Now used the most recent data collected by the U.S. Department of Education through the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey and Beginning Postsecondary Student survey. Along with per-student estimates on out-of-pocket costs (i.e. after financial aid) associated with remedial courses, the researchers conclude that first-year remedial college students and families spent $1.5 billion on tuition and living expenses, including $380 million in loans, for content and skills they should have learned in high school.

Higher income students pay the most

One in four college freshmen pay on average an extra $3,000 and borrow nearly an extra $1,000 for remedial coursework in their first year of college. However, students from families in the top income quintile that attend more expensive private nonprofit four-year colleges pay on average an extra $12,000 for remedial classes.

While underprepared students average two remedial courses each during their first year, higher-income students at expensive private nonprofit four-year colleges take more remedial classes than lower-income students at those same colleges, suggesting these schools enroll many lower-achieving but higher-income students.

All told, private colleges enroll just 11 percent of the total first-time freshmen remedial population, but they account for more than three times as much of the cost and debt associated with remedial education.

Longer to Graduate, Delayed Earnings, Adult Learners

Full-time students seeking bachelor’s degrees that take remedial courses in their first year are 74 percent more likely to drop out of college. Those who do graduate take 11 months longer than non-remedial students, requiring additional living expenses and delaying earnings.

“Imagine how much more affordable college could be if we could get more students to graduate and graduate on time.  You used to get a four-year degree in four years.  Today, the typical student takes five years to complete a bachelor’s degree,” said Michael Dannenberg of Education Reform Now, a co-author of the report.

The $1.5 billion figure does not include other categories of remedial education students, including adult learners and students who do not go directly from high school to college.  Nor does it include extra general taxpayer costs for postsecondary education subsidies.

Read report here. 

***

Education Reform Now is a non-profit think tank based in Washington, DC that aims to develop the next generation of progressive education ideas and leaders.  Education Post is a non-partisan, non-profit communications organization dedicated to building support for student-focused improvements in public education.

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edWeb.net - Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching

edWeb.net - Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching
Community 

URL: www.edweb.net/clrt

Sponsored by Ventris Learning

The Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching (CLRT) community strives to help today’s teachers to meet the unique instructional needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Today’s ELA/Literacy standards require a command of Academic Classroom English (ACE) in reading, writing, speaking, and listening, resulting in high expectations for every student. However, many educators (and the public) view students who live in poverty and/or are Standard English Learners (SEL) (who speak varieties of English that differ significantly from ACE) through a deeply ingrained deficit perspective, with lowered expectations. Educators tend to equate home language varieties with poor grammar, and rely on ineffective correctionist strategies. They lack the linguistic know-how and resources necessary to help SEL’s (including African-American English speakers) become bi-dialectally fluent. They need strength-based language development supports that enable every student to succeed in early literacy regardless of his or her level of school readiness, or home language.

In this professional learning community, educators will come together to collaboratively explore theoretical and practical advances in Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching best practices shown to help every student succeed academically. The community hosts free webinars with leaders in the field that are highly engaging and interactive. Online discussions provide an easy way to continue the conversation and share ideas and experiences with peers across the country.

As a member of the community, you'll receive:

Invitations to free webinars on new ideas and successful practices.
Free CE certificates for attending and viewing webinars.
Access to a resource library with webinar recordings, free resources, and quizzes to receive a free CE certificate for all past webinars.
Online discussion forums where you can connect and collaborate with other educators and experts.

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The Journey to a Growth Mindset: Carol Dweck's Keynote Presentation

Carol Dweck presented and discussed her latest research around "growth mindsets" at Education Week's Leaders to Learn From event in Washington, D.C. o
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Turmoil Behind The Scenes At A Nationally Lauded High School

Turmoil Behind The Scenes At A Nationally Lauded High School | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
P-TECH completely overhauled the school-to-career pipeline, creating a six-year program that blended the traditional four years of high school with two free years of community college, plus IBM internships and mentorships. And it offered all this to some of the students most underserved by the current system: Most are from low-income families, African-American or Hispanic, and a majority are boys.

The school accepts students by lottery, not entrance exam. That means, unlike other early college programs, there are no academic requirements to get in. The high school's website states boldly: "With a unique 9-14 model, the goal for our diverse, unscreened student population is 100% completion of an associate degree within six years."

Riding the waves of good press, P-TECH was quickly replicated all over the country.

But five years in, a year before the first full graduating class of the original school is expected, the model is showing signs of growing pains. Many of its students failed college courses early on, and internal emails obtained by NPR reveal disagreements across the many parties to this partnership over how best to serve those students.
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Undergraduate curricular reform efforts at Harvard and Duke suggest there's no one way to do it well

Undergraduate curricular reform efforts at Harvard and Duke suggest there's no one way to do it well | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Rethinking Gen Ed'

Amid concerns that requirements may not mean much to students or professors, Harvard and Duke Universities both look to curricular changes to improve undergraduate education.
March 10, 2016
By Colleen Flaherty

General education programs at their best impart to undergraduates basic knowledge in -- or at least exposure to -- a variety of disciplines, and provide some sense of how to study and live in a thoughtful way. Their iterations on different campuses are also supposed to embody the values of a particular institution. But how often do they meet that mark? Two institutions concerned that their general education programs were somehow falling short -- Harvard and Duke Universities -- have initiated the massive undertaking of reform.

At both institutions, a major concern is that students don't have much sense of what general education is supposed to be accomplishing -- a concern at many colleges nationally. A recent survey of provosts by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, for example, found that while many institutions were moving beyond basic distribution requirements in their general education designs, just 9 percent of respondents said they believed all students were aware of their desired learning outcomes.
Varying Visions of Gen Ed at Harvard
Harvard’s revamped program, which was recently approved by its Faculty of Arts and Sciences, aims to honor the various ways in which professors think about a liberal arts education, and increase student buy-in.
“While many students and faculty highlight the success of specific gen-ed courses, the gen-ed program at Harvard has not yet established a clear and consistent identity among our students and faculty,” reads a Harvard program review committee’s interim report from 2015. “Moreover, despite its prominence in every student’s curricular experience, it plays no defining role in the identity of Harvard College. Most students agree that a well-executed gen-ed program would be valuable, but they are confused about the goals and purposes of the current program.”
Faculty members, by contrast, “are more divided about the value of gen ed, some preferring a straight distribution requirement instead,” the report continues. “But these results are tenuous in both cases, since much of our discussion with students and faculty revealed confusion about what a general-education requirement aims to be and how it differs from a distribution requirement. … Confusion about this distinction at Harvard stems from the fact that in practice our program is a chimera: it has the head of a gen-ed requirement with the body of a distribution requirement.”
Harvard’s only had three general-education programs in its history, and the current program was adopted in 2009. The university didn’t plan to create a new program so soon (and arguably still hasn’t) but found significant flaws in the first five-year review. Interviews with hundreds of faculty members and students revealed that there was little enthusiasm about the program.
Undergraduates in many cases were seeking out “easy-A” courses to fulfill their distribution requirements for their eight general-education courses, said Sean Kelly, the Teresa G. and Ferdinand F. Martignetti Professor of Philosophy and chair of the program review committee. “They didn’t really understand what the point of it was. And they tended not to take the courses in the general-education program very seriously.”
Faculty members, meanwhile, seemed split on what they thought a general-education program should accomplish, Kelly said. Some adhered to a more classical ars vivendi model, in which students are exposed to courses that teach them how to live a meaningful life. Others adhered to a more medieval model, in which students gained knowledge in each of the liberal arts (or in an era of numerous such arts, a broad selection). And others still believed in a more Romantic model, in which student choice and self-cultivation were paramount.
Kelly said that Harvard’s current program focuses more on the art of living model than anything else, with limited success. In addition to students missing the point, faculty members also reported that such courses were difficult to develop and teach.
“It’s a different range of questions -- what’s the best way to teach this material so that students will recognize that it’s not about what I need to know to go on to the next-level class, but to change the life I’m leading five, 10, 15 years from now?” he said.
Rather than ditch the art of living model entirely, however, he and his committee sought to round it out by incorporating the two others. All three ways of thinking about general education are “legitimate and fascinating,” and have a history at Harvard and in higher education more broadly, Kelly said.
So instead of eight courses in different distribution areas centered on the classical model, Kelly and his committee proposed a kind of compromise: four electives in each of four perspectives -- centered on the humanities, history and social sciences, natural sciences, and ethics and civil values, respectively -- plus three more typical university-style course distribution requirements across the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering. There’s also a required course in quantitative reasoning.
The review committee’s final report refers to the improved program as a “4+3+1” model. The first four courses would come from the following categories: aesthetics, culture, interpretation; histories, societies, individuals; science and technology in society; and ethics and civics.
Guiding questions for professors creating such courses include:
What does my area of inquiry have to offer of value to the society or culture at large?
What does a student, who might otherwise have no further education in my area of inquiry, need to know in order to appreciate this value?
How, in particular, will knowing these things help a student to think differently about his or her ethical decisions or approach differently his or her contributions to civil discourse and action?
The other three required courses are more typical departmental ones -- one each in arts and humanities, the social sciences, and natural sciences or engineering.
Students may test out of the last qualitative reasoning course, according to the committee.
Encouraging Risk or Laziness?
The committee also proposed that one of the general-education courses may be taken pass-fail, at the discretion of the instructor, to encourage students to take risks and enroll in something in which they may not necessarily get a top grade. Despite limited, arguably counterintuitive evidence to suggest that students who take courses pass-fail may actually outperform those who take them for traditional grades, Kelly said there’s been some controversy surrounding the issue. Some professors don’t believe in pass-fail, or in having students taking a course pass-fail in the same section with those taking it for a grade.
In the end, the idea of offering a pass-fail option in one course seemed like a compromise, he said. (A separate, existing policy could allow students to take the three other distribution requirements pass-fail.)

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OER and you. The curation mandate — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

OER and you. The curation mandate — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
the good news:  Our government edtech officials are convinced that librarians should play a role in curating the burgeoning number of open educational resources (they gave us several shout-outs and ensured we were there).  We made an impact.
But it was clear to our little group, that to the larger majority of the participants, we were not even on the OER radar.
Some OER background:
Launched in October, GoOpen is a U.S. Department of Education campaign founded with the belief that
educational opportunities should be available to all learners. Creating an open education ecosystem involves making learning materials, data, and educational opportunities available without restrictions imposed by copyright laws, access barriers, or exclusive proprietary systems that lack interoperability and limit the free exchange of information.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Joyce has a nice article on OER.  Concerning observations, especially about the gathered groups knowledge of OER.

Certainly, we know some acquaintances who used to write/publish openly, even with clear Creative Commons monickers.  We've also seen individuals them move the resources and successor materials behind membership, paywalls, and pay for use teacher-developed materials sights.

As has been common since the 90's, broken links and moved digital assets are a considerable challenge. It will prove interesting to watch the costs of replacing once open content when newly classified after updating. I may not occur.  

The question of moving copies on sight or into school clouds while doing version checking will also be interesting to watch. 

Will OER be the 'living' resources mentions so often in discussing 'smart books;' books/multi-media texts that are updated perpetually by the team of authors and bots loop through verification loops of any hyper-media/text referenced.  
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, March 7, 7:11 PM
Thanks to Gordon Dahlby for the cogent commentary!
 
"Joyce has a nice article on OER.  Concerning observations, especially about the gathered groups knowledge of OER.
 
Certainly, we know some acquaintances who used to write/publish openly, even with clear Creative Commons monickers.  We've also seen individuals them move the resources and successor materials behind membership, paywalls, and pay for use teacher-developed materials sights.
 
As has been common since the 90's, broken links and moved digital assets are a considerable challenge. It will prove interesting to watch the costs of replacing once open content when newly classified after updating. I may not occur.  
 
The question of moving copies on sight or into school clouds while doing version checking will also be interesting to watch. 
 
Will OER be the 'living' resources mentions so often in discussing 'smart books;' books/multi-media texts that are updated perpetually by the team of authors and bots loop through verification loops of any hyper-media/text referenced.  
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Resources for Filmmaking in the Classroom via @edutopia

Resources for Filmmaking in the Classroom via @edutopia | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Explore classroom filmmaking with this playlist of resources for teachers and students.
Gordon Dahlby's insight:

via Edutopia

 

Looks like a $1500+ camera w accessories in main pic.   Not likely commonly affordable.

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