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A city at sleep | George Greenlee

A city at sleep | George Greenlee | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


Cork city, at 5am. Irelands second largest city. A ghost town, I walked for over 30 mins before meeting another person. Patrick Street was empty, there wasn’t  even a bus at the station. But slowly the workers arrive, and the deliveries start.

 

All shots Fuji Film X-Pro1, 18mm,  ISO3200, Handled at speeds 1/13-1/250th


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Capture One Fujifilm X-Trans Raw support tested | Digital Photography Review

Capture One Fujifilm X-Trans Raw support tested | Digital Photography Review | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


Capture One v7.0.2, the latest version of Phase One's image management and Raw conversion software, includes support for Fujifilm's X-Trans cameras. Given the trouble this non-Bayer design has caused for third-party Raw converters (it remains to be seen how many will ever offer support), this has caused a lot of excitement in the Fujifilm community. So, just how well does Capture One do, and how significant is the problem , in the first place? To provide some context, the vast majority of digital cameras ever made perceive color using what's known as a Bayer Color Filter Array, named after the late Kodak engineer Bryce Bayer. For its recent cameras, Fujifilm has developed its own color filter array pattern, which it calls X-Trans. The idea behind X-Trans is that its pattern repeats less often than the Bayer pattern, rendering redundant the low-pass filter that usually protects against moiré. The disadvantage of creating a non-standard color filter array (especially one that took two years to develop the demosaicing algorithm for), is that third-party software makers have to do a lot more work to provide Raw support....

 

"As you can see, Capture One's color response is much closer to the camera's results than Adobe's default profile. The default results are also substantially more sharpened than the JPEGs are. In comparison with the camera JPEGs, there are hints of the same brushstroke effect that Adobe Camera Raw produces, though not to the same degree and mitigated, perhaps, by the better color response."


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Baltimore | Johnny Patience

Baltimore | Johnny Patience | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Baltimore is a cozy little village in western County Cork, Ireland. It is the main village in the parish of Rath and the Islands, the southernmost parish in Ireland. It is the main ferry port to Sherkin Island, Cape Clear Island and the eastern side of Roaring Water Bay (Loch Trasna) and Carbery’s Hundred Isles. And mostly, it’s only about 10 Minutes away from where we live.

The last time Rebecca and I went to Baltimore was in August 2012. This time it was completely quiet. No tourists around, only a couple of locals and some fishermen. I liked the atmosphere a lot.

All the shots below were taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fujinon 35mm 1.4 lens
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Objectified | shooting products with the X-PRO1 | Patrick La Roque

Objectified | shooting products with the X-PRO1 | Patrick La Roque | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

 

I’ve read a few reviews of the X-Pro1 dismissing its use in the studio, confining it purely to the realm of event and documentary photography. Obviously this a genre at which it excels and the core of the system’s philosophy. But as most of you know these cameras have now become my main system, not merely a fun add-on. Which means they ARE used for studio jobs. All kinds of studio jobs.

I recently did a shoot for Serdy Media, a production company which owns several specialized TV stations in Quebec — namely Zeste and Évasion, the french food and travel channels. This was a studio product shoot for their new online boutiques. After thoroughly testing the setup, I decided to again forego my Nikon kit and do the entire session using only the X-Pro1 and the 35mm Fujinon XF f/1.4 lens. It worked beautifully.

 

The X-Pro1 actually has several things going for it for this type of work:

- The ability to use the rear LCD for live view without changing how you usually work with the camera.

 

- The two zoom levels with built-in sharpening to pinpoint the focus.

 

- Large focus point coverage.

 

- Horizon line and framing guides.

 

- The ability to switch the same lens to macro mode for detail shots.

 

- No mirror to deal with. Combined with the timer function this is as stable as it gets.

 

All of this makes for a very easy going experience and allows for extremely precise work. The two points of contention when it comes to shooting this camera for studio and/or flash photography are 1) sync speed and 2) tethering. The sync speed obviously wasn’t an issue in this case. As for tethering, I’ve discussed my solution in another post already: an Eye-Fi Pro X2 card. To be honest this was definitely the weakest link in the chain, and I was very fortunate to work with a client who didn’t mind the glacial speed at which photos were getting transferred to the computer. But I didn’t like it. I made jokes about it but it bugged the hell out of me the entire time. I’m glad further testing has revealed an ad-hoc network to be exponentially faster. I won’t get caught with this problem again.


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Jonathan Ryan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 5:08 AM

X-Pro 1 shines once again.  Beautiful to see what an accomplished photographer can do with it under controlled light.

Andrew Brown's comment, December 12, 2012 9:35 AM
used in a studio shoot and loved it also. Much better than the old 5D2's
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Abrams Falls, Great Smoky Mountains NP | Ken Rowland

Abrams Falls, Great Smoky Mountains NP | Ken Rowland | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

 

Abrams Falls is found along the Abrams Falls trail from within Cades Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Although I’ve visited Cades Cove multiple times this was the first time we hiked in to see the falls

 

.....

 

Photography at Abrams Falls. Making an image here that you’ll be happy with once you’re finished requires patience if the falls are corowded. On this particular day, it took about 2 hours to get positioned and get the photos we wanted as we waited for people to move. One of the activities that continues to baffle me is when folks think it’s safe to climb the falls. I’ve seen this at other waterfalls I’ve visited and I dread the day I see someone slip and get hurt. Signs are posted here about climbing on the rocks but they are ignored.

 

Equipment Used. This image was made using the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fuji XF 35mm f/1.4. Exposure of 7 seconds at f/11 ISO 800. A polarizing filter was used to take the glare off the water. I used a higher ISO so that I could have a shorter shutter speed to retain some detail and texture in the flowing water.


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andrew quinn's curator insight, June 21, 2013 2:48 PM

Shows water force 

 

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Italy | Thomas Menk

Italy  | Thomas Menk | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


Some shots with the X-Pro1 from a short trip to Venice and Tuscany this year.


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Colour or Black and White? Black and white version . . . | Roger Gould photographer

Colour or Black and White? Black and white version . . . | Roger Gould photographer | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


It was the 1st day of Spring in Melbourne, so that seemed a good reason for some street photography. Then the thought came to me re colour or black and white? With the release of the Leica Monochrom with a black and white only sensor in the camera, a new super 50mm lens and an incredible price tag for each, are there any benefits in it for me if I owned them? I am very happy with the quality of theFuji X-ProPro1 and its lens so what are the advantages ? Firstly although I visualise my street photos in BW there are also times that I come across subjects that need colour eg. my recent graffiti pictures. Also I frequently add to my stock pics in colour while doing street pics. Does that mean you have to carry 2 Leica M9′s one for colour, one for black and white. A very pricey proposition.


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The Fujifilm XPro-1 some months on: my settings | Tony Bridge

The Fujifilm XPro-1 some months on: my settings | Tony Bridge | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


This week’s blog posts are kind of in two parts: having owned the X pro for a couple of months now, I have had plenty of time to get to know it, and for it to get to know me. I suspect we have reached the point where we have an amicable accommodation, and as a result it has become my daily. I now find that I really only get out the Big Boys Toy when there is a job for it to do (grand landscape, studio portraiture and the like). For the rest of the time my XPro-1 follows me everywhere. And, having had time to get to know its little foibles, I have come to a sense of how it works for me, and the way I like it to sit be set up. When I wrote my formal review, one or two of the people who came and visited the blog asked me what my settings were. I did not share these at the time, since I was still working them out for myself. But now I have had time to consolidate the way that I work, I would like to share this with you.


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Five Favorites from Past Month (with X-Pro1) | Jeff Seltzer

Five Favorites from Past Month (with X-Pro1) | Jeff Seltzer | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Below are five (5) favorites from the past month - they are personal favorites, including a couple of portraits. Each was captured with the wonderful Fujifilm X-Pro1. I've included a few words about each image.  The portability of the Fuji system allows me to carry all three primes with me a lot of the time, and the below shots show images with each: 60mm, 35mm, and 18mm.


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Infrarojo - Images | Ricardo Espinosa

Infrarojo - Images | Ricardo Espinosa | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Infrared Photography by Ricardo Espinosa


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Fuji X-Pro 1 AF (Autofocus) speed and accuracy - Review and tipps | PhotosDeLux

Fuji X-Pro 1 AF (Autofocus) speed and accuracy - Review and tipps | PhotosDeLux | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


The X-Pro 1 uses contrast detection autofocus (CDAF) compared to phase detection autofocus that is usually found in DSLR cameras. As I have shown in an earlyer post, I like to photograph at minimum aperture to create a shallow depth of field. And in those situations perfect AF lock is essential for good results. The advantage of contrast detection is, that it is very accurate when it locks onto the target. On my phase detection DSLR camera I have gotten used to pushing the shutter half way for 2-3 times before I trust that the AF locked correctly onto the subject.

So is the X-Pro 1 useless for moving subjects? Not at all! You just have to approach things differently to get good results! Here are my tips to get the best results from the X-Pro 1.....


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Focal Reducer Lens Adapter Announced by Metabones | Thom Hogan

Focal Reducer Lens Adapter Announced by Metabones | Thom Hogan | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Over a decade ago I wrote about building your own DX focal reducer from cobbled parts (technically it was an afocal wide converter). The goal was to get back the 1.5x crop factor and make a lens work as you'd expect from it's marked focal length. The result wasn't very pretty, but it gave us true wide angle for our D1 cameras long before Nikon got around to making wide angle DX lenses. Unfortunately, those focal length reducers couldn't be done simply, mostly because the mirror box pushes the mount forward, so you have to do the corrections far forward of where they're optimally done. The nice thing about mirrorless cameras, though, is that the sensor to mount distances are far shorter; short enough to allow for a far simpler focal reducer approach.

Today, Metabones has announced a commercial focal length reducer and mount converter for NEX systems called the SpeedBooster. The initial versions work with Canon EF lenses and provide a 0.71x focal length reduction. In reducing the focal length, you also get an aperture change (as with teleconverters, which do the opposite of a focal reducer): you gain approximately one stop of aperture. The EF versions of these SpeedBooster adapters feature auto-aperture, IS support, EXIF data transfer, and even partial autofocus support on many recent Canon lenses (post 2006). The adapter also has a detachable tripod foot that's also an Arca Swiss plate. The first version to be made available will be Canon EF to Sony NEX (E-mount), available later in late January (25th) for US$600. Other versions will be at different prices (Leica R to Fujifilm XF or Sony NEX is listed at US$400 on their site).

 

Since there's a lot going on here, let me reiterate what the SpeedBooster does:

 

Mount conversion — initial version for Canon EF lenses to Sony NEX, but conversions to m4/3 and Fujifilm XF mounts are also coming. Also, Metabones claims they will eventually have Leica R, Alpa, Contarex, Contax C/Y, and Nikon F versions (if they did everything they currently write about, that would be 18 different versions of the SpeedBooster.

 

Focal length conversion — the focal length is reduced 0.71x. Thus, a 50mm Canon EF lens becomes a 35.5mm lens. That's not quite a perfect reduction between full frame and APS, but close enough for most of us (the 50mm should become 33.3mm to be a "perfect" 50mm equivalent on NEX).

 

Aperture adjustment — the effective aperture is increased by one stop. So an f/1.4 lens becomes an f/1 lens. This is again just about the right change for going from full frame to APS: you'd get about the same DOF on the Sony NEX with a lens mounted on this adapter as you would from a full frame camera if you kept all the other parameters equal. Some may wonder how the aperture gain is achieved. Simple: the image circle is reduced (concentrating the collected light into a smaller area). 

 

MTF gain — the "compression" effect of the focal length reducer also tends to reduce the size of aberrations, which are a primary driver of MTF. Metabones uses a Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 as their example for plotting the lens' normal MTF versus with use of the SpeedBooster, and there's indeed a clear MTF boost in the central area on an m4/3 version of the adapter. The NEX version, however, shows more MTF loss as you move to the corners (the center is still higher than the original lens). The MTF gain claim is a little less reliable than the other claims: there's going to be high variability in the size and position of the gains depending upon the lens used and the format you're adapting to.

 

Telecentricity gain — digital sensors like light to hit at less than 15° to perpendicular. In some wide angle lens designs that's difficult to achieve, so you get impacts from the slanted light. One simple to see impact is vignetting. One by-product of the focal reducer is that light is slightly more tele centric. The difference isn't dramatic, but I'll bet we see visible differences in some adapted lenses' vignetting performance.

 

If you want to read more about the technical details of the SpeedBooster focal reducer, Metabones has a White Paper on their Web site that describes the details at length. The Metabones adapter was designed by Brian Caldwell, the man who created some of the best corrected lens designs for Coastal Optics (the 60mm f/4 Macro, for instance, is one of the best performing lenses I know of for Nikon mounts, and it can pass UV and IR light as well as visible). 

 


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Baltimore | Johnny Patience

Baltimore | Johnny Patience | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Baltimore is a cozy little village in western County Cork, Ireland. It is the main village in the parish of Rath and the Islands, the southernmost parish in Ireland. It is the main ferry port to Sherkin Island, Cape Clear Island and the eastern side of Roaring Water Bay (Loch Trasna) and Carbery’s Hundred Isles. And mostly, it’s only about 10 Minutes away from where we live.

The last time Rebecca and I went to Baltimore was in August 2012. This time it was completely quiet. No tourists around, only a couple of locals and some fishermen. I liked the atmosphere a lot.

All the shots below were taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fujinon 35mm 1.4 lens
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No Colour Necessary | Olaf Sztaba

No Colour Necessary |  Olaf Sztaba | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

With the surge in digital imaging technology, nearly everyone has gained access to the world of photography. One would think that the elimination of cost barriers, ease of use and abundance of processes would yield a large amount of exceptional work.

Quite the opposite! Photography has become a form of visual “fast food.” You don’t need to look far to find an avalanche of images: barbeque photos, birthday photos, parties, flowers, sunsets, sunrises etc. The majority of snapshots are taken without much thought and without any artistic or visual effort – just for the sake of taking them. After all, it is so easy to press the button, again and again and again…

But this is only a half the problem. Then, all these photographs are being constantly uploaded on the Internet – not for private viewing – they are there for others to enjoy too. Blurry photos are not a problem, ten of the same photo of a barbeque, not a problem. After all, you might want to see the grill and the meat on it from all angles. I guess you get my point.

What is the solution to this hysteria of snapping and sharing? Unfortunately there is none. There is, however, one area of photography that has remained relatively unaffected by this epidemic – it is a black and white photography. Why has black and white photography remained relatively immune to this problem? Because it requires some effort!

I was lucky enough to start my photographic life journey with black and white film not by the choice but through necessity. Back then in communist Poland it was difficult to get film – black and white was the most accessible and cheapest. Stripped from the distraction of colour I had to focus on the importance of light, my subject and emotions.

Even today with all the wonderful tools at our disposal, I believe the best way to learn the art of photography is by starting with black and white imagery.

Black and white is both the simplest and most sophisticated of photographic disciplines. When there is no distraction in terms of colour you are forced to compose, search for the right light, experiment and focus on the subject and its emotions. You take light and transform it into lines and shapes. You wait for a decisive moment and start arranging or eliminating the elements to create one whole – your vision. Brainless snapping has no place in this process. Ted Grant said, “When you photograph people in colour, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls!” I could easily extend this line of thought to other genres of photography. Look at Ansel Adams’s landscape masterpieces. Just shades and lines – it’s raw, it’s honest, it’s beautiful. No colour necessary!

While colour has its place, in the hands of a photo snapper it can become a masquerade or visual fast food. Have you ever wondered why there are so many ads with sunsets? They are easy to consume!

Don’t get me wrong – I like colour and there are many brilliant photographers that use the colour palette with stunning results. In fact, the majority of my own work is in colour.

At the same time I found colourful photographs are easier to take. Sometimes the lack of composition or a weak subject could be masked with spectacular colours. You don’t need to indulge in a photograph. You don’t need to connect intellectually and visually with the photo – it is just there. Very often you hear people say, “What amazing colours!” The rest is not important.

It is very different with a good black & white image. Colour, your main distraction, is out of sight. Your senses immediately awaken to search for something more, something deeper and more profound. You look for forms, shapes and lines. You start de-coding the message. It takes effort to process the photographer’s message, to interpret those lines and shapes. It is a much richer experience.

So each time you find yourself at an artistic crossroads or feel a lack of inspiration, go back to seeing in black and white. You will be amazed how much better your photographic vision will get. Even your colour work will gain a new perspective and freshness.

All images but last two taken with the Fuji X-Pro1.
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Northbrook Park wedding photography | Jonathan Ryan

Northbrook Park wedding photography | Jonathan Ryan | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


On the most beautiful Autumn day of the year, I headed over to Northbrook Park in Surrey for Kinari and Zaf’s wedding. It was kind of an odd feeling when I arrived. For various reasons I hadn’t had chance to meet up with Kinari and Zaf before their wedding and we’d done everything by phone and email. But the odd thing was, I knew lots of the people there. There were several people whose wedding I had photographed amongst the guests and all day people kept coming up to me and saying “oh yes, you did my sister’s/daughter’s/brother’s/friend’s wedding.” Including one couple whose wedding I’d photographed almost exactly 6 years ago. What a lovely warm welcome. Just as well, because the day was beautiful but cold. Beautiful like this…

Jonathan Ryan photographs Kinari and Zaf's wedding at Northbrook Park with a selection of Fuji cameras...


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Mike Croshaw Photos's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:26 AM

Not the XE-1, the X-Pro 1, but its a cool blog anyway.

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Fuji X-Pro1 Review - six months in | Kevin Mullins

Fuji X-Pro1 Review - six months in | Kevin Mullins | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


I’ve now been using my Fuji X-Pro1 for around six moths professionally. Initially, I was commissioned by Professional Photographer magazine to test and review Fuji’s (then) latest addition to their X-Series camera range. I was so taken by the camera, that I got one straight away, along with the three lenses that were initially on offer. I’m a professional wedding photographer by trade and I specifically shoot in a reportage or documentary wedding photography style and the Fuji X-Pro1 seemed like a perfect tool for that job at the time. I already had the Fuji X100 which I also loved, and also used at weddings. However, there was always the nagging feeling that the X100 just wasn’t quite up to the mark for professional wedding photography – specifically the inability to change the lenses. I still have my X100, it’s battered and bruised and well loved. It’s my go-everywhere camera and I don’t intend to part with it, but when the Fuji X-Pro1 came along I was very excited by the opportunity that it gave me to compact the equipment I used, make it lighter and allow me to get in closer than ever before whilst still being as unobtrusive as possible. I recently took ownership of a Canon 1DX and whilst that is an amazing camera in it’s own right, it won’t be replacing my X-Pro1 at weddings. This won’t be a full technical review – you can find many of those on the Internet or indeed an more in depth review in my article at Professional Photographer magazine. This is more a findings overview, along with some pictures......


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Suggestions to improve the FujiFilm X-Pro1 | David Degner

Suggestions to improve the FujiFilm X-Pro1 | David Degner | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

Dear Fuji, I have owned 3 x-100s (one died in a hurricane, one was stolen, and one has made it through 3 revolutions) but currently I love your X-Pro1 and use it on an almost daily basis. Especially after your last firmware upgrade it is starting to become one of the best cameras on the market for photojournalism. But it still has some rough edges that can be polished.

For me, the perfect camera is one that I can use by muscle memory without having to think about its quirks. Like a musician that can trust the notes that will come out of his or her instruments, the best cameras are trustable, predictable, and intuitive, leaving the photographer to focus on his or her art. Here are a few suggestions to make the x-Pro1 more of an artists favorite tool.

1. Adjusting the ISO should use the up-down arrow buttons at all times. Currently, if I am using electronic viewfinder the up-down arrows adjust the ISO while I am in the optical viewfinder the left-right arrows adujust the ISO. Really simple thing, but oh so annoying.

2. All manual focusing, aperture, and shutter-speed adjustments should register while the shutter button is half pressed. Currently, when I have the shutter button half depressed and I adjust my focus, aperture, or shutter-speed they aren’t registered until I release the shutter button.

3. JPG and processed RAW images should align all pixels. When I open a JPG in photoshop and then open a RAW file and layer it on top of the JPG the pixels on the left and right 10% do not align. I assume there is some in-camera de-distortion processing that is not being done with the Adobe Camera Raw. It is important that Adobe has these lens distortion recipes so that they can add it to their RAW processing engine. They have a check-box to turn the distortion correction on and off in Adobe Camera Raw, but with the x-Pro1 that check box is grayed out.

4. While in manual focus mode and using the electronic viewfinder decrease the obstruction of the focus distance indicator at the bottom of the electronic viewfinder. I can not see the bottom 5-10% of the screen because the opaque blue measuring tape blocks a large portion of the image. Either move it down, or make it largely transparent. It gets in the way of a large part of the compositional space.

5. Make navigation to the “Format” menu item easier. Now it takes at least 10 button press to format a card. You can reduce that to 3 button presses by allowing the user to press “Menu” then “Up” and looping around to the end of the menu.

6. Visually confirm where the focus is. I love the new firmware update to manual focus speed and usability. It makes the camera much more usable. But I would still like some way to be sure my image is in focus. About 5% of the time I am finding that what I thought I focused on isn’t in focus. When I am in manual focus and I hit the auto-focus (AE-L/AF-L) button or I twist the lens manual focus it would be nice if the EVF zoomed in for a split second to give me visual confirmation of what is actually in focus. Or another option is a temporary visualization of hard edge detection, focus peaking, like this. One of these solutions would make a much wider range of M lenses usable on the x-pro one.

7. Always show the Menu on the back screen never through viewfinder. It is really unnatural to hold the camera up to the eye when going through the menu options. It also freaks out the people around me a bit. It just looks and feels very unnatural. When I hit the Menu button the menu should always appear on the back screen and not in the viewfinder, no matter which view-mode I am in.

8. Make the Flash option in the menu toggle-able. There is a greyed out menu item that shows the ability to turn flash triggering on and off, but it is always greyed out and I can’t select it. The flash mode should be able to over-ride the silent mode settings. Often I want to be in silent mode, but trigger a flash.

9. Make battery only insertable one direction. This is a big physical design flaw. 1/4 of the time I am in a rush and I insert the battery in a direction that doesn’t work (I am using aftermarkets batteries that don’t have the same markings). I should be able to insert batteries by feel instead of having to look down and study them.

10. Fix the flash shoe signal so that the Canon ST-E3-RT will trigger flashes. I would love to use my remote trigger to manually control flashes on the X-Pro1 but for some reason it won’t fire. I have no idea where the problem is. The x-Pro1 will trigger my canon 600EX-RT, but not the Canon ST-E3-RT.

11. Put a break on the lens when it hits infinity and close focus limits. One of the best things about Leica is that they could be manually focused intuitively. Without even using the rangefinder, I would always leave my lens on infinity and move it from muscle memory to the correct position of focus. This is much harder on the x-1pro lenses because I don’t physically feel when I hit infinity. I know it would require physical alteration to the lens, but this would be another thing that transforms how people use your cameras.

12. I need a 35mm 1.4 equivalent lens. I know it is in production but it can’t come fast enough.  Make it good and make it fast because it will be my primary lens.


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Fuji X-Pro1 on Vacation | Santa Fe, New Mexico | David Moore

Fuji X-Pro1 on Vacation | Santa Fe, New Mexico | David Moore | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it


There’s travel photography, and then there’s vacation photography. In the first you’re traveling to shoot, and your time and gear is chosen carefully to deliver great images. In the second, you’re just on holiday and like everyone else, you want to bring a camera along. This is specifically a review of using the camera on a family vacation – I wasn’t sent to England and France on assignment, nor did I spend lots of time there specifically going out to shoot. But I did want to bring a camera that wasn’t going to annoy me. Those of you who have been following along for a while will remember that it was a vacation trip to California last year that pushed me into looking for a smaller but high-performing camera. The willing but somewhat limited Olympus EPL2 has now been and gone, and it was the Fuji X-Pro1 (and 18mm F/2.0 and 35mm f/1.4 lenses) that made the trip with us across the Atlantic...

 


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Discovering San Francisco in Black and White - Memento | Stephan Geyer

Discovering San Francisco in Black and White - Memento | Stephan Geyer | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

 

I've been to San Francisco before, and whilst I have enjoyed the view from the Golden Gate Viewpoint on a foggy afternoon, and taken the mandatory touristic photos, I really don't enjoy that type of shots.

 

Today, I've decided to post a selection from my latest trip to San Fran, where I explore the type of photos I enjoy taking - All with the X-Pro1, naturally!


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NEW: Samyang 8mm f/2.8 lens fisheye lens for Fuji X mount

NEW: Samyang 8mm f/2.8 lens fisheye lens for Fuji X mount | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

 

The 8mm f/2.8 Fish-eye Lens for Fujifilm X-mount from Samyang is a fast, ultra wide-angle lens designed to work with the Fujifilm X series mirrorless cameras. Multi-coated lenses mean less aberration and sharp images and a built-in petal-type lens hood prevents unwanted glare. The minimum focusing distance is 1' (0.3m) and the angle of view is 180º. This affordable, smooth focusing, manual lens is perfect to explore the creative possibilities of the latest-model mirrorless cameras.

 

Price at B&H

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/876963-REG/Samyang_sy28fe8mbk_fx_8mm_f_2_8_Fish_eye_Lens.html

 


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Fuji X-Pro1 Photos at The New York Transit Museum | Patrick Leong

Fuji X-Pro1 Photos at The New York Transit Museum | Patrick Leong | One of the Secret of Life is to Make Steeping Stones out of Stumble Blocks | Scoop.it

I' m not a big fan of the hot weather in New York City during the summer. In my opinion, it's humid, nasty, crowded, and smells a bit funky lol. Don't get me wrong. I love the outdoors... I just don't love it in New York City in the summer . So in general, I usually check out a few more indoor scenes. The other day, I went to the New York Transit Museum, and it was pretty cool. I brought along my Fuji X-Pro1 with all three lenses.


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