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One Community, Many Identities
One Community, Many Identities
Teaching students in Early Stage 1 HSIE about recognisable differences between languages spoken in their neighbourhood. Hurstville Public School.
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Language of the Month

Language of the Month | One Community, Many Identities | Scoop.it
Jess Chu's insight:

This is very practical resource containing language resource packs with over 60 languages to choose from.   Each pack contains language activities, maps and flashcards to provide students with a global perspective of the differences between languages spoken around the world.  

 

A good way to utilize the resource pack is to have a class display on a big board because it makes it easy to swap the sheets for different languages.  Teachers should pin on the board a world map and also bring in a globe to show students where the speakers of the language live.  As Hurstville Public School is predominantly Chinese, the “Mandarin” pack will be very useful.  The pack includes “first words” in A4 size, written in English and Mandarin and with pronunciation.  These can be displayed on the board so that students become familiar with basic words.  Images of the country can be put on the board to make it more colourful and allow children to reflect on cultures from around the world.

 

The website also has interactive video clips showing different children speaking their home languages (http://www.newburypark.redbridge.sch.uk/langofmonth/programs.html).  The video clips provide information about who speaks the language and examples of first words, questions and answers, and numbers from 1-12.   These can be shown in class to teach students that people in their neighbourhood and around the world speak different languages.  Early stage 1 students will hear that words are made up of sequences and individual sounds and syllables.  This is an excellent activity for helping children develop phonemic awareness and to hear the sounds of foreign languages. 

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Global Wonders: All-New Form of Children's Entertainment - DVD Series - Global Wonders: Around the World

Global Wonders: All-New Form of Children's Entertainment - DVD Series - Global Wonders: Around the World | One Community, Many Identities | Scoop.it
Global Wonders - California based entertainment group specializing in the development of children's DVDs and Music CDs.
Jess Chu's insight:

Global Wonders creates entertainment and educational products to teach students about the various cultures of their family, friends, neighbours and the world.  Their DVDs and music CDs are a fantastic classroom resource for students to discover music, languages and lifestyles of people around the world.  In particular, the "Global Hello Song” on the website allows students to explore the different languages spoken in the world and learn how to greet others in foreign languages.   

 

The video clip shows people from around the world wearing their traditional clothing and greeting “hello” in their language.  As the video does not say what each language is, students can discuss what they think based on their knowledge and background.  The lyrics “no matter who we are, we all have words to say, words that mean hello” teach students that no matter the language spoken, people around the world all share common characteristics as well as differences.  Students will learn some foreign words and recognise that different cultures have different ways of saying "hello".  This also encourages respect for cultural diversity.

 

The song is very catchy and entertaining, and a useful tool for engaging early stage 1 students.  It is a great way to reach auditory learners who learn best by listening.  Teachers can easily integrate actions into the song to benefit kinesthetic and tactile learners who learn best when they can express themselves with movement.  Visual learners respond well to videos and can also learn by seeing their classmates use actions.  

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Language spoken at home - Hurstville City

Language spoken at home - Hurstville City | One Community, Many Identities | Scoop.it
In Hurstville City 49% of people speak a language other than English at home. Access in-depth demographics for Hurstville City from the population experts, id.
Jess Chu's insight:

This website shows the proportion of the population who speaks a different language other than English at home. In the Hurstville region, 49% of people speak a language other than English, with the dominant language being Mandarin and Cantonese. The site itself contains information about the demographics for the area, population, age structure, ethnicity, religion and so forth. 

The website is quite an easy read for teachers as the information is presented in maps, tables and charts but the percentages and statistics will be too complex for early stage 1 students. It would be better for teachers to use the information in their lesson preparation and present to the class a simple chart or language map to demonstrate the languages spoken in Hurstville.

 

As an activity, the students can break into small groups to discuss what other languages if any, they can speak or understand. Students will learn to identify some of the languages spoken in the families of their classmates.  They can come back together as a class to create a tally table or picture graph of the language statistics of their class and recognize some of the common languages that all people share as well as some of the differences. 

The teacher can take the class on an excursion to the main streets of Hurstville to observe dual language shop signs and listen to the various languages spoken by the people there. The teacher can take photos of the street and shop signs and later, make a slideshow to present to students.

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Disney It's A Small World: Hello, World!

Disney It's A Small World: Hello, World!

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Disney It's A Small World: Hello, World! [Disney Book Group, Disney Storybook Artists].

Jess Chu's insight:

This is very colourful picture book, perfect for early stage 1 students.  It teaches you how to say “hello” in different languages.  Each language is represented differently, for example “Bonjour” in France has a picture of a boy wearing a beret, riding a bicycle and carrying baguettes in front of the Eiffel Tower.   It also expands students’ multicultural awareness and phonemic knowledge as each word is divided into syllables, for example “hello” has “he-loh” written underneath.

 

A good activity is to create a class “Book about us” where students can draw and write about their culture and language.  Students can draw or paint a picture of themselves and something that represents their culture, and write a phrase in English and their language.  This will work well for Hurstville Public School, which has students from many diverse backgrounds.  If a class does not have students from many backgrounds, students can choose a language spoken in their neighbourhood.  A student may choose Japanese, draw a girl in a Kimono and write “Konichiwa” (hello in Japanese).  When they have completed their page for the book, the teacher can put it together and share it with the class.

 

Another idea is that children can practise saying greetings in different languages.  When the teacher calls the roll each morning, children can say “hello” in a different language instead of the usual “I’m here”.  This can encourage students to continue using their first language.  It's also a fun way to start the day for children!  

 

There is also an activity kit at http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/kids/SmWorldActKit_AMAZON._V156108281_.pdf

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Local Languages

Local Languages | One Community, Many Identities | Scoop.it
Last week we told you how the government wants all kids to learn an Asian language. But there are languages much closer to home that some people think are just as important.
Jess Chu's insight:

In the report, we see that students from Pegs Creek Primary School in Karratha, Western Australia are learning Yindjibarndi, a local Indigenous language.  Indigenous people are trying to keep their languages alive by teaching different words, meanings and phrases to school children.  

 

As Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p.397) maintain, embedding Indigenous perspectives in the curriculum needs to begin with teaching in Indigenous languages and dialects.  Schools can embrace the local dialect by having Indigenous language classes taught by Indigenous elders or teachers.  To engage students, teachers should point to physical objects and pictures when teaching new words to the students.  It is important to learn local Indigenous languages because it represents the culture of the nation and helps to strengthen our knowledge of Australia’s history, culture and identity.  In addition to learning the language, teachers should emphasize the importance of keeping the Indigenous language and culture alive.  

 

A language map, as mentioned in the report, is also a useful tool to help students form sentences using people, verbs and locations.  As an activity, teachers can prepare a worksheet for students to match the pictures with words or sentences of the Indigenous language they are learning.   Children will learn how multiple languages can be used to describe the same thing, and appreciate language differences and the Aboriginal culture. 

  

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia.

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