oncoTools
Follow
Find
117 views | +3 today
Rescooped by Relatris from Pharma
onto oncoTools
Scoop.it!

Social listening in pharma: the top 15 hashtags to follow on Twitter

Social listening in pharma: the top 15 hashtags to follow on Twitter | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Here at Neovoca we continually keep up-to-date with what’s happening within the pharmaceutical industry. A tool which we think is particularly effective to achieve this is Twitter. If you want to start becoming more social in Pharma try starting with social listening.

 

We now share the top 15 hashtags in pharma with a brief explanation for each:

 

 1. #Pharma   

General,  worldwide industry. Often news on companies, academic studies, drug releases, corporate communications  and regulatory articles

 2. #DigitalHealth         

Covers innovative  spectrum of technologies that achieve specific health outcomes, articles include medical devices, sensors & health data

 3. #mHealth

‘Mobile health’, the practice of medicine and health initiatives supported by mobile devices inc. smartphones, tablets & computers

 4. #PatientEngagement                 

Patients invested in their own care. The valuable relationship patients have with health stakeholders, most commonly healthcare providers

 5. #hcsm 

‘Healthcare social media’ throughout the world, interactions that create & share valuable medical information that support patient care

 6. #hcsmeu

‘Healthcare social media Europe’, the same as #hcsm but focused within Europe, this often reflected in the difference in regulation

 7. #hcmktg

‘Healthcare marketing’, best practice including digital, multichannel and email marketing  as well as ethical and regulatory considerations

 

....


Via Andrew Spong
Relatris's insight:

If you like to start getting into the vast world of twitter and trying to understand how conversations about pharma topics work, this list is definitively a good starting point. Also check out Pharma Open Access Meducation (http://stwem.com/2013/05/08/phoam-is-the-concept-phoamed-is-the-hashtag-introducing-pharma-open-access-meducation/)

 

more...
Tim Mustill's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:45 AM

Nice one Matt (and Andrew) - defo worth a reScoop

eMedToday's curator insight, May 30, 2013 9:33 PM

Great reference list

oncoTools
OncoTools provides you with the latest mobile and electronic tech updates in the field of oncology, and medicine in general. Find tools to facilitate your daily clinical work, your continuing education and your need for up-to-date information
Curated by Relatris
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

mHealth: building a mobile companion app for cancer sufferers

mHealth: building a mobile companion app for cancer sufferers | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Cancer treatment is a very complex and painful process demanding the highest level of accuracy from both physician and patient. And it is also an area where mobile technology can assist with treatment.

Relatris's insight:

migrate2mobile is a company supporting their clients to go mobile with their existing products and information. They published a summary of benefits mobile applications can have for cancer patients. While some of these are really supportive (e.g. symptom tracking), others seem to be rather constructed- or which patient really needs to do blood count tracking or units conversion? Still, they list some classical examples where mhealth is useful for both, patients and doctors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

V-Learning: Targeting MET with an emphasis on NSCLC

V-Learning: Targeting MET with an emphasis on NSCLC | oncoTools | Scoop.it

ESMO’s strategic goal is to continually develop on-line educational tools for professionals in the field of Medical Oncology and foster new challenging CME opportunities for ESMO Members

 

What is ESMO V-Learning? 

Recent scientific discoveries in cancer and signalling pathways for which an update of knowledge is needed and for its complete understanding additional video material is beneficialScience in cancer is moving rapidly and to keep in pace with rapid progresses, more complete understanding of molecular biology/pathology, or technological advances is needed. The V-Learning platform is ideal to present such novelties end enhance understanding of clinicians by additional visual components beyond classical slide presentationIt present in more realistic way what’s going on at the cancer cell level and provide in more details the mechanistic aspects involved in different cancer processes  

Relatris's insight:

The European Society for Medical Oncologists has many great resources for (continued) education. The newest family member are V-Learning lectures: slides and video sections combined (with questionnaires). Video lectures with slides are the format of the widely popular MOOCs, providing a more personal way of teaching than just hearing a voice from the off while seeing some slides. This integration of new trends in education into their continued education lectures is an innovative way of ESMO to further improve their programms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Smartphone game 'GeneGame' to crowdsource cancer research (Wired UK)

Smartphone game 'GeneGame' to crowdsource cancer research (Wired UK) | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Gamers playing a Cancer Research UK smartphone app set for launch this autumn will be helping to find new treatments for cancer.

Currently titled "GeneGame", users of the app will be analysing genetic data and helping to pinpoint the genetic causes of cancer as they play.

"2013 is the year that we're changing the face of cancer research"
Amy Carton, Cancer Research UK

"We have terabytes, upon petabytes of genetic data," Cancer Research UK's citizen science lead Amy Carton told Wired.co.uk. "The nature of that data is such that humans are far better at analysing it than an algorithm."

Hidden in that data, some of which originates from studies carried out in the 1970s, could be information that points researchers towards new treatments for cancer. The vast amount of data means that, unfortunately, "our scientists are not getting through it fast enough," says Carton.

That's where the power of the crowd comes in. There are millions of smartphone users spending million of minutes a day playing smartphone games like Kingdom Rush. Carton wants to tap into huge amount of human effort and direct it towards medical research.

Relatris's insight:

News from the UK cance gamification app. What initially started as an initiative involving Facebook, Google and Amazon will now be carried out by a company named Guerilla Tea. Looking forward being a citizen scientist having fun doing research :-)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

e-ESO ePatCare

e-ESO ePatCare | oncoTools | Scoop.it

ESO has just launched ePatCare:

 

ePatCare for ESO is an innovative and interactive platform for viewing, creating, sharing and presenting patient cases.To download ePatCare desktop version (for PC) or iPad version (Coming Soon!) and use same eEso credential, please login first.Click the gear in the top right corner of the screen and select the ESO version.Visit the ESO ePatCare store to view the ePatCare for ESO patient case library.Simply select the cases that interest you and save them to your own personal ePatCare Cloud - you can now view your cases whenever you wish!Navigate cases either chronologically or one department at a time by taking a virtual tour. Just choose your preferred view.Creating cases is intuitive and sharing with your colleagues is simple.You can also edit your cases, adding more information as your patient's treatment progresses.
Relatris's insight:

e-ESO, the electronic European School of Oncology, now offers an ePatCare plattform for its participants. This tool was developed by Boehringer Ingelheim and launched in 2012. It offers an easy and intuitive way to present patient cases for education (like at e-ESO) and discussion. Unfortunately there is no description of any implemented social tool (not even a comment function?) to fasciliate discussion of cases, which would enable some kind of virtual tumor board meetings.

 

http://www.inoncology.com/oncology-case-studies/epatcare-patient-cases-program.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Power to the patients: Doc appointment and review website Vitals raises $22M

Power to the patients: Doc appointment and review website Vitals raises $22M | oncoTools | Scoop.it
Vitals raises $22 million to add staff, health insurance decision-support tools to doctor appointment and ratings website to satisfy consumer demand for healthcare price transparency
Relatris's insight:

Vitals currently serves as a doctors review website and soon will help patients in the US to get through their health insurance journal.

 

I took the opportunity to check some of the doctors I visited myself in the US for their reviews in Vitalis. To make it short: If you get good reviews, you'r off great, with many stars blinking into the potential patients eyes. But if there is only one or two patients who weren't happy with you, it looks bad, as the dominating star rating immediately downgrades you.

 

So how to handle such rating systems that they stay objective? What about just showing star rating after a doctor got e.g. 10 written reviews? What about fine tuning, e.g. separating organizational issues (waiting times) from medical issues?

 

Doctors rating will come more and more in Europe too, so maybe it's time to think about a system more elaborate than Amazon-like stars.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

OncoAssist becomes latest app to be classified as a medical device

OncoAssist becomes latest app to be classified as a medical device | oncoTools | Scoop.it

An iPhone and iPad app that offers oncologists a full range of clinical decision support tools has become the latest mobile application to be classified as a medical device.


OncoAssist is designed to save oncologists time by providing quick and easy access to prognostic tools that can help with decisions on risk stratification and clinical trial.

Relatris's insight:

OncoAssist seems to be a very interesting app for oncologists, aggregating a bunch of useful tools from certified sources and seeking approval from authorities. Right now only available (and certified) in the UK and Irland, we are looking forward seeing this app in the Swiss app store.

 

For more information: http://oncoassist.com

For a walkthrough: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LG8zisyJaAA

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Survey: 45 percent of smartphone users want online physician appointment booking

Survey: 45 percent of smartphone users want online physician appointment booking | oncoTools | Scoop.it

The survey asked how interested the respondents were in communicating with healthcare providers or obtaining diagnostic tests through a smartphone or tablet [...]

Some 43 percent of respondents were interested in asking doctors questions, another 45 percent were interested in booking appointments, while 42 percent were interested in checking the effects and side effects of a medicine. While the percentage differences between the age groups didn’t vary much, people over the age of 65 were less interested than other age groups. Of the healthcare services listed, the patients were least interested in getting reminders to participate in programs for exercise, diet, weight loss and other wellness programs.

Relatris's insight:

About 30% of respondents of the questionnaire like to interact with their physician online and would approve of tools allowing to do so easily. Unfortunately, the article does not state which percentage of total American adults online those respondents represented. Still, an app supporting patient/physician interactions can definitively improve communication, which is especially important with diseases as complex as cancer, enhancing patients trust in doctors and medications.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

New Mobile App Assists Oncologists In Navigating Ever-Evolving Sea Of Cancer Information

New Mobile App Assists Oncologists In Navigating Ever-Evolving Sea Of Cancer Information | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced an exclusive sponsorship of MDLinx, a web property of M3 USA, for a searchable mobile application that provides reviews of the latest oncology-specific journal articles.

 

The journal aggregator app, called MDLinx Oncology Articles, is available for Google Android® and Apple iPhone® platforms and allows users to access the oncology information that is most important to them wherever they may be. Physician editors at MDLinx rank, sort and summarize oncology articles from more than 150 oncology journals, allowing oncologists to not only choose what journals they want to follow and filter by sub-specialty, but also search articles by key term or tumor type. The content is selected and controlled exclusively by the MDLinx Editorial Team at M3.

Relatris's insight:

I downloaded this app about two weeks before its official launch and did a small analysis of the publications chosen by the MDLinx team.

 

The app has a straight-forward, lean, and appealing design with a sponsor screen quickly showing up while the app is starting and a clear and easy to handle journal search/add.

 

First, I chose 6 journals (BJC, CCR, EJC, IJC, JCO and Lancet Oncology) in the app and compared the articles in the app stream with the TOCs on the journal website. With the exception of Lancet, all articles were "online first" and showed up in the app randomly distributed from the date of online publication up to one week after.

 

I then analyzed the percentage of main articles published by 4 of those journals (BJC, CCR, JCO and Lancet) that appear in the app stream within this week for the last couple of issues. The number was 70% to nearly 90%, which still leaves you with a high number of articles in your feed.

 

Last, I compared the articles in the app with those in MDLinx email newsletter for 5 consecutive days for the journals chosen. On 4 of the 5 days, the app suggested more publications than the newsletter (25-45% more), while only few publications showed up in the newsletter but not in the app. The newsletter therefore provides you with a stringer selection of the published articles.

 

Taken together, the app is an appealing and handy way to get publications-on-the-go, but to enhance the value of the app (especially compared to other journal aggregator apps), I think even more curation is needed- even when now and then, some important information may get lost.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Beyond16,000 #ASCO13 tweets: leveraging the use of social media for ASCO and the oncology community

Beyond16,000 #ASCO13 tweets: leveraging the use of social media for ASCO and the oncology community | oncoTools | Scoop.it

the 2013 gathering of ASCO on Twitter has been just as impressive as the physical one taking place in Chicago–the congress’ official Twitter hashtag #ASCO13 has already generated more than 16,000 tweets. [...]  There is not doubt that more tweets will be generated at #ASCO14 and we will see an even more diverse group of online participants at #ASCO15.


The question here is “then what?”


As I mentioned in an earlier post, emerging communication channels like Twitter has made medical information much more available for the general public. To become a member of the ASCO 2013 online community, all you need is to include #ASCO13 in your tweets. But  including the hashtag is the easy part. Moving forward, it is more important for us to ask what we can do to make the online conversations more relevant, how Twitter can be used in a more meaningful way, how we can continue the online discussion when the meeting is over, what else can be done from a social media perspective in the future to facilitate engagement and whether channels like Twitter can ultimately create value from a healthcare perspective.



 

Relatris's insight:

Steven Shie wrote a very nice article about the increasing use of twitter at ASCO13, and he asks the relevant question: Then what? He discusses 4 areas where he sees potential to improve conversations via Twitter at big scientific meetings as ASCO. For me the most important one is- Making tweets more relevant. Use sub-hashtags (to lower the number) and feature important ones. In our days, when oncologists get completely overflown with studies and data (the daily newsletter of MDLinx offers around 100 new publications- per day! and it's curated), we need to find ways to emphazise the relevant stuff. And the relevant sources. It's not about numbers, it's about quality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Doximity: a mobile app changing the way physicians communicate

Doximity: a mobile app changing the way physicians communicate | oncoTools | Scoop.it

As the clinical complexity of cases increases and physicians further specialize and sub-specialize, there are more physicians involved in the care of any one patient. When dispersed across hospitals, it becomes difficult to work as clinical team- ie. sharing information, insight, and proposed treatments with each other. Rather than being limited to the information input in the EHR or sent via a fax machine from the 1950s, physician-information mobile apps are emerging as a new tool for physician-to-physician conversations.

Relatris's insight:

Another (HIPPA compliant) communication tool. Clearly, in large countries with different EHR systems in place, such tools have a certain necessity. But is it really helpful to publish one system after the other? For which one a doctor should decide who works with multiple colleagues having different systems? In Switzerland, many years ago, the doctors implemented their own system, http://hin.ch, for secure and uniform communication. All doctors having the same technology really fascilitates life.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Residency programs grapple with use of smart devices

Residency programs grapple with use of smart devices | oncoTools | Scoop.it

An estimated 85 percent of residents have smartphones, which they use an average 2.1 hours per day—including for clinical work. While such smart devices as phones and tablets promise advances in medical efficiency and functionality, there may be unintended consequences as well.

Relatris's insight:

Read the linked article!!! (we cannot scoop it here as it is a pdf file) It raises several core concerns about how we use mobile devices (we think it also applies for desktop computers on your consultation table) in clinical practice. It not only applies to residents but also to clinicians. Do you watch your computer screen during consultations? How does your patient feel in this situation? It happend to me several times- and it felt very wired and rude.....

 

"It is important to pause and consider the unintended consequences of the adoption of this technology. For example, there have been multiple reports of medical errors caused by information technology, such as computerized provider order entry and clinical decision support systems

[...]

Because of the increased connectivity of these devices to work colleagues as well as to residents’ personal life, interruptions may increase in both realms. This may result in ‘‘distracted doctoring’’ and increased medical errors.

[...]

From an educational perspective, we have found that providing residents with smartphones makes them, in effect, more global and less local. This combined with increased interruptions can create professionalism issues. A resident may be providing good care for a patient on a distant ward when he responds quickly to a request from a nurse via smartphone or tablet. However, this act may be viewed as rudeness by the patient right in front of the resident.

[...]

Because devices make reaching supervisors easier, residents may defer most decision making to supervisors, with resulting loss of autonomy and learning.

[...]

Tablets and smartphones also increase connections to residents’ personal lives. Recently at our institution, an attending on rounds observed his medical student accessing Facebook while the attending was discussing a recently diagnosed cancer with the patient. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Relatris from Health Care Social Media
Scoop.it!

HealthTap launches 'AppRx' so you can get app recommendations from real doctors

HealthTap launches 'AppRx' so you can get app recommendations from real doctors | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Health Q&A startup HealthTap has added a new feature to its popular mobile apps called AppRx that lets doctors recommend high-quality medical mobile apps to everyday users. 

 

There are more than 40,000 health and wellness mobile apps available in the iOS and Android app stores and there are a lot of crummy apps out there. For example, there are more than 600 diabetes apps and more than 200 children’s health apps. Having legit doctors tell you which apps you should download and use makes a lot more sense than trying all those out.


Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2013/05/30/healthtap-apprx/#VPIqX8IajB23lVHB.99


Via Alex Butler
Relatris's insight:

Some kind of health app curation and definitively a valuable guide for patients in the vast ocean of health apps. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

McKesson Specialty Health collaborates with oncologists to develop new oncology-specific iKnowMed Generation 2

McKesson Specialty Health announced today the launch of iKnowMed Generation 2SM, a powerful web-based electronic health record (EHR) developed in collaboration with oncologists. Drawing upon their daily clinical experiences, more than 200 physicians have come together to help create a system that advances the quality and efficiency of cancer care delivery.


Generation 2 is designed to meet the unique needs of community-based cancer centers and to help physicians and their staff deliver high-quality care while improving patient safety and optimizing practice workflow. [...] It is available from any web-enabled device, is optimized for mobile access via tablet or smart phone and allows the sharing of information between all oncology specialties including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists and surgeons. Additionally, iKnowMed Generation 2 includes features such as detailed cancer diagnosis and staging content; an extensive, up-to-date cancer regimen library; flexible documentation options; e-prescribing; automated charge capture functionality and auto-sharing of clinical notes.

 

Oncologists attending the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting will be able to see these functionalities firsthand at the ASCO EHR Lab, an event for oncology professionals to research EHR technology and collaborate with leaders in the field of EHR development.

 


 


Relatris's insight:

An updated electronic health record management tool for mobile access and optimized interaction can be tested at ASCO 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

US government shuts down- affecting clinical trials and research

US government shuts down- affecting clinical trials and research | oncoTools | Scoop.it

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) stopped processing grants, some government websites were made inaccessible and many important research programmes were left hanging, potentially putting lives at risk in the case of some disease studies. Use of government telephones and e-mail was also suspended. The restrictions were still in place as Nature went to press.


At the NIH, headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, 73% of the agency’s 18,646 employees were immediately placed on furlough, or enforced leave. The agency also stopped accepting patients for its clinical trials or initiating new studies. Minimal staff remain to care for lab animals and to protect NIH facilities.

Relatris's insight:

I realized how much of the services of the US government I actually use regularly when visiting the PubMed and Clinicaltrial.gov webpages that both aren't updated anymore. Luckily clinical trials on run at NIH can still be continued. But the halt in both, new trial initiation and NSF research and grant processing, will have a long-term impact.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Augmented Reality iPad App Guides Surgeons During Tumor Removal

Augmented Reality iPad App Guides Surgeons During Tumor Removal | oncoTools | Scoop.it

A new iPad app from Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Germany is using augmented reality technology to help surgeons excise liver tumors without damaging critical vessels within the organ.

 

A CT scan is performed before the surgery and the imaged vessels are identified within software, all of which is then transferred to the iPad. During the procedure the surgeon can navigate the imaged liver to see where the vessels are, and if the camera is turned on and pointed at the exposed liver the app automatically superimposes the vessel structure of the organ onto the live picture. Notably, the app is not simply a concept, but was already tested successfully during a liver tumor removal at Asklepios Klinik Barmbek in Hamburg.

Relatris's insight:

As with many of these innovations, this application first has to proof usability in daily routine- but again the creativity of the new tools developed and the pace of their development is highly fascinating.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Docwise is an app that helps physicians stay up to date on medical journals and news

Docwise is an app that helps physicians stay up to date on medical journals and news | oncoTools | Scoop.it

 Docwise is a medical app that aggregates new articles from medical journals and medical news sources.  There are similar applications, such as Read by QxMD and Docphin, but with this app, physicians also have the ability to select their favorite medical news sourcesDocwise is a medical app that aggregates new articles from medical journals and medical news sources.  There are similar applications, such as Read by QxMD and Docphin, but with this app, physicians also have the ability to select their favorite medical news sources such as Medscape.

Relatris's insight:

There are quiet some journal aggregator apps available. In this review, Docwise is tested, an aggregator in magazine style that also lets you add news sources. The addition of journals is very handy, and with the exeption of highlighting, all necessary options are available.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Google Glass in the OR and in Medical Education: Becoming a Disruptive Technology

It's not the first time I say Google Glass can be the biggest hit in medical technology this yeas, and now as the number of good examples is still rising, it's becoming more and more evident. Here are a few cases and experiments.


Rafael Grossmann, MD, FACS had a pilot project with this team about the use of Google Glass in medical education. Here is his summary:

[...]

Lucien Engelen and his team at REshape created a video that shows what a regular patient-doctor interaction would look like with the Google Glass and what additional features it could add to the process:

 


Relatris's insight:

Some people are scared of Google Glasses, others disguise technologies like these, and still others are fascinated by the possibilities those glasses could bring, and play around to explore the chances and limitations.  It is impressing what is going on, whether the glasses will ever find really useful applications or not. Here are some examples of what people try to do. Find more by googling.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Social Media for Oncologists

Social Media for Oncologists | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Today we discuss the dissemination of research results, clinical trials, and other oncology news using social media, as well as what type of media oncologists use, how useful and relevant this type of information is for most oncologists, and where oncologists can plug into information and communication sources.

We speak with Michael A. Thompson, MD, PhD, who was the medical director of cancer research at ProHealth Care Regional Cancer Center, in Wisconsin, and clinical trials lead investigator of the NCI Community Cancer Centers Program. Dr. Thompson has a blog over on ASCO Connection, a professional networking site for communication within the worldwide oncology community, and he is active on Twitter. You can find his tweets at the Twitter handle, which is the same as a username, @mtmdphd.


Relatris's insight:

A very insightful interview with one of the leading onoclogists on Twitter and other social networks. Read it to understand what's evolving on social media for oncologists and how to get into it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Skin Doctors Question Accuracy Of Apps For Cancer Risk

Skin Doctors Question Accuracy Of Apps For Cancer Risk | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Smartphone apps that assess moles for skin cancer risk missed threatening moles one-third of the time, say dermatologists who tested some of the apps. The apps could give people a false sense of security about their skin.

 

Ferris and her colleagues used photos of 188 moles, 60 of which were confirmed as melanoma, to test four find-the-skin-cancer apps: three that do instant in-phone diagnosis, and one that ships the mole mug shots to a real live dermatologist for review.

 

The dermatologists correctly identified the suspicious moles 98 percent of the time. But the apps that relied on algorithms were much less reliable, missing the melanoma 30 percent of the time.

 

"One app would pick up a certain melanoma, and it would be missed by another," Ferris tells Shots. And it wasn't like they were going out of their way to stump the app. "These are melanomas that I could show to an untrained person and they'd go, 'That looks bad'“.

Relatris's insight:

With pattern recognition known as one of the things humans overrule computers by far, the outcome of this study actually does not suprise too much. But again an example how important it is that apps get reviewed and tested.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Tracking cancer conversations online: The Social Oncology Project 2013

Tracking cancer conversations online: The Social Oncology Project 2013 | oncoTools | Scoop.it

The amount of clinical data available in oncology has increased exponentially over the last several years –the number of cancer-related journal articles posted to PubMed has increased 349% since 1999.  It should be no surprise that the number of cancer-related conversations has exploded in similar fashion. As those cancer-specific conversations continue to grow, it’s important to take a closer look at the physicians who are driving them. That desire to understand physicians’ online activity led to the publication of the MDigitalLife Social Oncology Project 2013.

[...]

Another important learning was that, increasingly, there isn’t just one cancer conversation – there are distinct and recognizable conversations happening now about dozens of different cancer varieties – each with its own participants, preferred channels, media coverage, and physician influencers.  As we looked at physicians who were engaging in cancer conversations, we were pleased to see that not only is their number increasing, but also that their conversations are becoming increasingly more robust and sophisticated.

[...]

But what’s more interesting (and, we believe, valuable) is to know which physicians are discussed most actively by their physician peers.

[...]

And while it would be a mistake to accept the number of peer-mentions as a 1×1 proxy for influence, when physicians cite and engage with each other online, it is a strong indicator that the mentioned physician is either a) consistently engaged in creating and sharing strong, credible content online, and/or b) exceptionally well networked with a peer group that has formed around a specific topic area.

[...]

Separate infographics will be posted this week covering breast cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer and lung cancer at w.cg/tsop13.


Relatris's insight:

Being a KOL in the time of social media, discussing with 140 characters.

 

So what is discussed? In an older article of KevinMD (http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/10/physician-twitter-examining-data.html), we found that paragraph:

 

What’s more interesting, of course, is the substance of their tweets.  We examined a sample of tweets related to 3 therapeutic areas: diabetes, breast cancer and prostate cancer.  

[...]

It was also interesting to note that prostate cancer was as widely discussed as it was … 70% of specialties mentioned it in their tweets.  Much of the volume there was driven by this summer’s controversy about the validity of the PSA test as a means of lowering morbidity;  In fact, 43% of the tweets about prostate cancer between May and September were related to this specific issue.


Relatris will definitively starting to follow what's going on on Twitter and examine, if it's a US phenomenon or if there are any European oncologists out there (in this project, only US physicians were included).


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

'Game changing' cancer database pushes fight against disease forward

'Game changing' cancer database pushes fight against disease forward | oncoTools | Scoop.it

The world's largest cancer database will be launched in the UK today, in what experts are calling a “game-changing” stride forward in the fight against the disease.

Millions of patient records containing detailed information on individual cancers and how they have been treated will be available to specialists around the country, paving the way for highly personalised treatment of individual patients.

“This is game-changing,” Jem Rashbass, who led the project at Public Health England, told The Times. “This puts us at the forefront of cancer care for the next two decades.”

“In effect every cancer patient has a rare disease that is different in some way from another cancer. This allows us to carry out refined searches to see how other tumours have responded to identify the optimum treatment as early as possible.”

Relatris's insight:

Great to have such a database. The big challenge will be to use it meaningfully, so not only have good search algorithms, but to Dran the right conclusions out of the results. Then, this will be a powerful tool!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Apple gets tough on medication dosage apps | mobihealthnews

This week physician-led medical app review site iMedicalApps pointed out that a number of medical app developers have received rejection notices from Apple because they included medication dosage information in their app, and Apple says it only accepts medical dosage information submitted by the medicine’s manufacturer. [...] By stretching this rule to drug dosage information, Apple appears to be taking a more active role in determining whether a medical app is providing trustworthy information. That is a slippery slope and one that will likely require Apple to hire a considerable amount of medical expertise to execute.
Relatris's insight:
Yes, it is a slippery slope, but don't you want a dosage tool that is absolutely sound and save? We need tools we can rely on.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Relatris
Scoop.it!

Study shows only 50 percent of cancer apps actually contain clinical evidence

Study shows only 50 percent of cancer apps actually contain clinical evidence | oncoTools | Scoop.it

In a recent study by Pandey et al in the Journal of Cancer Education, the authors sought to identify mobile applications related to oncology as of July 29, 2011. Results of the study included 77 apps in the final analysis.


Unfortunately, as mentioned earlier, only a quarter of the apps were uploaded by health care agencies. Clinical evidence was noted in slightly over half the apps, and even those created by health care related agencies demonstrated that only 79% had scientific evidence provided.

Relatris's insight:

"Clinical evidence was noted in slightly over half the apps".... This is really an unacceptable status, for clinicians as for patients. There clearly is a high need of quality control in the field of medical apps!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Relatris from Pharma
Scoop.it!

Social listening in pharma: the top 15 hashtags to follow on Twitter

Social listening in pharma: the top 15 hashtags to follow on Twitter | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Here at Neovoca we continually keep up-to-date with what’s happening within the pharmaceutical industry. A tool which we think is particularly effective to achieve this is Twitter. If you want to start becoming more social in Pharma try starting with social listening.

 

We now share the top 15 hashtags in pharma with a brief explanation for each:

 

 1. #Pharma   

General,  worldwide industry. Often news on companies, academic studies, drug releases, corporate communications  and regulatory articles

 2. #DigitalHealth         

Covers innovative  spectrum of technologies that achieve specific health outcomes, articles include medical devices, sensors & health data

 3. #mHealth

‘Mobile health’, the practice of medicine and health initiatives supported by mobile devices inc. smartphones, tablets & computers

 4. #PatientEngagement                 

Patients invested in their own care. The valuable relationship patients have with health stakeholders, most commonly healthcare providers

 5. #hcsm 

‘Healthcare social media’ throughout the world, interactions that create & share valuable medical information that support patient care

 6. #hcsmeu

‘Healthcare social media Europe’, the same as #hcsm but focused within Europe, this often reflected in the difference in regulation

 7. #hcmktg

‘Healthcare marketing’, best practice including digital, multichannel and email marketing  as well as ethical and regulatory considerations

 

....


Via Andrew Spong
Relatris's insight:

If you like to start getting into the vast world of twitter and trying to understand how conversations about pharma topics work, this list is definitively a good starting point. Also check out Pharma Open Access Meducation (http://stwem.com/2013/05/08/phoam-is-the-concept-phoamed-is-the-hashtag-introducing-pharma-open-access-meducation/)

 

more...
Tim Mustill's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:45 AM

Nice one Matt (and Andrew) - defo worth a reScoop

eMedToday's curator insight, May 30, 2013 9:33 PM

Great reference list

Rescooped by Relatris from i-Pharma Digital
Scoop.it!

Mobile Health Apps and Government Regulation: What You Need to Know

Mobile Health Apps and Government Regulation: What You Need to Know | oncoTools | Scoop.it

Mobile devices represent an exciting new frontier in patient care. Smartphone apps, such as Parrish Medical Center’s exciting HealthBridge app, help promote healthy behaviors and provide more ready access to medical information. Unlike many aspects of care, however, the mobile health industry is relatively untamed and unregulated. But that’s about to change.

According to ModernHealthcare.com and FierceMobileHealthcare, the FDA will formally issue guidelines on how it intends to regulate mobile health applications.

 


Via Nikos Papaioannou
Relatris's insight:

Looking at the alarming numbers of apps that do NOT provide correct results (e.g. opiod converting apps as showed earlier on this site or around 50% OF ONCOLOGY APPS  (see our next entry)) it is highly important that there is some control. We can see multiple attemps starting right now, including one of the FDA. Unfortunately, in all the information we could found, the main issue seems to be privacy and which which apps will NOT be regulated.

 

Fortunately, there are some other initiatives like the Happtique Health App Certification Program: 

 

Apps that meet all of the Technical Standards will then be evaluated for the Content Standards, which will be conducted under the auspices of internationally recognized third party organizations, such as the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and CGFNS International, and performed by clinical specialists selected based on the mobile app’s specific subject matter. Happtique will continue to expand its HACP Content Review Partners and is currently in discussions with a number of organizations with various areas of clinical expertise. http://www.happtique.com/app-certification/


We will introduce more of these control processes and other criticism of the use of medical apps here on this site in the next days. 

more...
eMedToday's curator insight, May 31, 2013 8:26 PM

Key points:

 

"While final guidelines and determinations remain to be seen, the FDA has offered the following:

Lifestyle apps, such as pedometers, will not be regulated.Similarly, apps that serve as personal or electronic health record systems will also avoid regulation.Mobile app developers will not need to seek federal re-evaluation for minor changes.There are no plans at this time to tax apps under the Affordable Care Act."