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Rescooped by Lars-Göran Hedström from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Stretch student collaboration skills with Breakout EDU

Stretch student collaboration skills with Breakout EDU | On education | Scoop.it
There is a new platform for immersive learning games that’s taking classrooms across the world by storm. Based on the same principles as interactive Escape The Room digital games — which challenge players to use their surroundings to escape a prison-like scenario — Breakout EDU is a collaborative learning experience that enhances critical thinking and creativity while fostering a growth mindset in students.

There are two types of games available for teachers to run in their classrooms: the physical games (which are the main games) use the Breakout EDU box (or any box with a hasp that can be locked) with a set of locks, and the digital games which only need internet-connected devices.

Gameplay revolves around a Breakout EDU box that has been locked with multiple and different locks including directional locks, word locks, and number locks. After listening to a game scenario read by the teacher, students must work together to find and use clues to solve puzzles that reveal the various lock combinations before time expires (usually 45 minutes). Teachers can either purchase the Breakout EDU kit, which includes a plastic or wooden box and a set of locks, or the individual pieces of the kit can be ordered from Amazon directly. Either way, it takes about $100 to get started with the physical games; the digital games are free.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Gamification

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 10, 2016 8:10 AM
There is a new platform for immersive learning games that’s taking classrooms across the world by storm. Based on the same principles as interactive Escape The Room digital games — which challenge players to use their surroundings to escape a prison-like scenario — Breakout EDU is a collaborative learning experience that enhances critical thinking and creativity while fostering a growth mindset in students.

There are two types of games available for teachers to run in their classrooms: the physical games (which are the main games) use the Breakout EDU box (or any box with a hasp that can be locked) with a set of locks, and the digital games which only need internet-connected devices.

Gameplay revolves around a Breakout EDU box that has been locked with multiple and different locks including directional locks, word locks, and number locks. After listening to a game scenario read by the teacher, students must work together to find and use clues to solve puzzles that reveal the various lock combinations before time expires (usually 45 minutes). Teachers can either purchase the Breakout EDU kit, which includes a plastic or wooden box and a set of locks, or the individual pieces of the kit can be ordered from Amazon directly. Either way, it takes about $100 to get started with the physical games; the digital games are free.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Gamification

 

 

Alex's curator insight, August 17, 2016 7:15 PM
good news for teens! Some gaming skills are useful :)
Claudia Estrada's curator insight, August 26, 2016 10:18 AM
Another way to motivate and engage students and make learning interesting.  
Rescooped by Lars-Göran Hedström from Into the Driver's Seat
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An Infinite Collaborative Image Canvas: CanvasDropr

An Infinite Collaborative Image Canvas: CanvasDropr | On education | Scoop.it

CanvasDropr provides a virtually infinite online canvas on which you and your friends / contacts can easily add, position, resize and rotate photos and video clips at will.

CanvasDropr can be used to brainstorm around visual collections, to select and organize images, and to prepare visual portfolios or tours to share with others or to be published online. 

 

From the official site: "The center of the CanvasDropr idea is to work and collaborate on a so-called "Canvas".

 

The canvas can be shared by an unlimited amount of people, and changes made in the canvas are updated real-time in every user’s canvas.

 

Users can easily drag and drop new images directly from their desktop onto the canvas."

 

CanvasDrops allows you to text chat in real-time with other "collaborators" you have invited as well as to set permissions for what "public" users can edit or modify on a "public canvas.

 

It is possible to place photos and video clips coming from Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and Picasa or to import one simply by providing its URL. 

 

The final canvas can be shared on FB or Twitter, downloaded as an "image" or a .zip file containing all of its images and can also be "embedded" on any site or blog.

 

The service is free to use.

 

Check this video: http://vimeo.com/31591478 ;

Find out more: http://www.canvasdropr.com/ ;

 

or you can try it immediately with no need for signup if you alrady have a Twitter or facebook account: http://www.canvasdropr.com/Signup.aspx ;


Via Robin Good, Jim Lerman
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, January 10, 2013 6:44 PM

A nice collaborative tool for images.

Rescooped by Lars-Göran Hedström from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How The Activity Learning Theory Works

How The Activity Learning Theory Works | On education | Scoop.it
How The Activity Learning Theory Works 

Vygotsky’s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artifacts, was the basis for Engeström’s version of Activity Theory (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). Engeström’s approach was to explain human thought processes not simply on the basis of the individual, but in the wider context of the individual’s interactions within the social world through artifacts, and specifically in situations where activities were being produced.

In Activity Theory people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. In the social world there are many artifacts, which are seen not only as objects, but also as things that are embedded within culture, with the result that every object has cultural and/or social significance.

Tools (which can limit or enable) can also be brought to bear on the mediation of social interaction, and they influence both the behavior of the actors (those who use the tools) and also the social structure within which the actors exist (the environment, tools, artifacts). For further reading, here is Engeström’s own overview of 3 Generations of Activity Theory development. The first figure shows Second Generation AT as it is usually presented in the literature.

Via Gust MEES
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manukadroopy's comment, August 30, 2016 5:36 AM
Thats interesting
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:46 PM
This is a fascinating take on Vygotsky's work applied to modern technology. What do you think?
Jaydin Nies's curator insight, September 19, 2016 2:47 PM

Many times when we learn we use many tools. They may be our minds or they may be outside objects. This is how we put them together and use it for the better. 

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Three Free Tools to Create Free Study Groups Online

Three Free Tools to Create Free Study Groups Online | On education | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Dr. Richard NeSmith
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