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Understanding metering, part one: introduction

Understanding metering, part one: introduction | On education | Scoop.it

One of the more important – yet almost always overlooked – aspects of camera operation is metering. Simply put, the meter determines what your final exposure is, and how bright or dark your image looks relative to the scene. Unless you are shooting manual – and even then – the camera’s exposure is determined by the meter. Add the fact that the eyes of a viewer tend to go to the brightest and/ or highest contrast portions of an image first (i.e. this should be your subject) – and it’s clear to see why it’s absolutely critical to understand both how metering works as a fundamental concept and any camera-specific peccadilloes that might exist. The last thing you want is to find that your camera drastically underexposed a once-in-a-lifetime shot of some critically important event because you didn’t know (or forgot) that the meter was extremely affected by point light sources*.

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Civic Media Project: Civic Media Project

Civic Media Project: Civic Media Project | On education | Scoop.it

via The Scout Report

 

"Civic media is the practice of using media and technology to promote a collective good. The Civic Media Project (CMP) "is a collection of short case studies from scholars and practitioners from all over the world that range from the descriptive to the analytical, from the single tool to the national program, from the enthusiastic to the critical." These case studies are written by scholars across a number of fields, including journalism, digital media, political science, and education. Case studies highlight civic media projects in four Sections: Play + Creativity; Systems + Designs; Learning + Engagement; and Community + Action. Highlighted projects include Presenting our Perspectives on Philly Youth News (POPPYN), a youth- produced TV News show and Aliens on Campus, an Alternative Reality Game at the University of Western Cape designed to address gaps in digital literacy education. Many of these projects focus on youth empowerment and education, so CMP may especially be of interest to youth workers and educators in alternative or out-of-school settings."


Via Jim Lerman
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Reading Portraits: Analyzing Art as a Primary Source  

Reading Portraits: Analyzing Art as a Primary Source   | On education | Scoop.it

Tom Bober and Brianna Zavadil White write: "You may have seen a portrait of a famous individual used alongside a title slide of a presentation or accompanying a list of facts about that person. In classrooms, portraits are often used as window dressing to history, a face to put with a name, event, or date, but portraits can tell students much more.

 

The strategy of reading portraiture encourages the visual analysis of a piece of art, similar to closely reading a document. The visual clues found in portraiture may be decoded to learn about the individual featured in the artwork. To get started, select visually complex images that include objects and a compelling setting."


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Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, September 14, 11:27 AM

Starting students off with primary source documents can be a challenge, as they struggle with archaic language, print quality, etc. Using images, in this case portraits, and having students examine them in a variety of ways, can make primary sources more appealing! I love the suggestion in the comments to compare two portraits to really get students thinking.

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How to Create Your Social Media Strategy

How to Create Your Social Media Strategy | On education | Scoop.it
Create your social media strategy! 7 tips to equip you with the tools and information you need to take advantage of all social media has to offer.
Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 18, 6:15 PM

Some handy tips here! 

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14 Smart Ways to Use Smartphone Cameras in the Classroom

14 Smart Ways to Use Smartphone Cameras in the Classroom | On education | Scoop.it
Check out these 14 great ways students can use their amazingly powerful smartphone cameras for all kinds of classroom applications.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 22, 1:56 AM

Some useful ideas.

a-virtual - Claudia M Pagano's curator insight, September 22, 7:35 AM

Some useful ideas.

Ely Córdoba's curator insight, Today, 10:33 AM
Over the years, smartphones takes an important part in the people, and more in younger people. In the classroom is very common the use of them, students use them to chatting, to read, to listen to music, and to use the camera in order to make photos or videos, and the last one has been very popular. However, stadistics show that the use of camera changes during the years; for example, today is less used in contrast with 2010, but this is not the point, the real point in this article is the motivation to implement this kind of tool in the different classes. All students have a smartphone, and as a teacher we can implement the use of the camera to change the teaching and give them dynamic activities. Some activities involve make videos, or stories with pictures, portfolios, collages, tutorial, presentations or different documents. These activities are atractive to students in order to change the way to learn and the applied activities in the process.
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Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning

Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning | On education | Scoop.it

Technology is an immense tool that can transform the way students learn. One of my favourite quotes which demonstrates this comes from Steve Jobs:
 “What a computer is to me is it’s the most remarkable tool that we’ve ever come up with, and it’s the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.“



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Ann Middlemiss's curator insight, August 14, 2015 4:55 AM

Interesting and intuitive way of looking at how technology can enhance learning.

Maria Bañeres's curator insight, September 19, 2015 12:17 PM

Just technology!

Sebastián Vásquez's curator insight, September 21, 7:13 PM
In my opinion, substitution, argumentation, modification and redefinition (SAMR) model is a very useful tool to have into account as a starting point, or as a reference one, to start thinking about the way teachers can design lessons and the role they want technology to play into the classroom. It could also be used as a way to make students reflect upon the way they normally use technology and to make them aware of other possibilities and different ways in which they could do it. Furthermore, we can use this method as a pretext to discover others and to explore other ways in which technology could help us all to enhance teaching-learning processes.
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Out of Pocket: What Teachers Across the Country Spend on Supplies

Out of Pocket: What Teachers Across the Country Spend on Supplies | On education | Scoop.it
Individual educators pick up where school districts leave off, but the results are messy — and unequal

Via Dr. Richard NeSmith
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POPFile - Automatic Email Classification - Trac

POPFile - Automatic Email Classification - Trac | On education | Scoop.it

"Description by The Scout Report

 

Email spam is a scourge that few can escape, slowing productivity and making it more difficult to focus on important emails. POPFile is an online tool that allows email users to sort incoming messages into categories that they create themselves. This allows users to manually classify emails in their inbox as spam. The system then "learns" to classify these emails based on your input. Users can create other categories that may also aid in organization, e.g. "work" or "personal." Interested readers will find both Windows and Mac OS X versions of POPFile for download."


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Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols

Tips For Acquiring Inexpensive STEAM Materials - Wee Warhols | On education | Scoop.it
I am a bit of a collector — some may say hoarder — of craft supplies or anything that I think my kids, myself, or my students can create or build with.  I love to hunt for cool items and I LOVE to get a good deal.  Before recycling or throwing anything away, I think, “What could we make with that?”  I realize that not everyone is like this and some people don’t want to sort through trash to find that cool treasure.  If you think that STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) education is costly, I’m here to let you know it doesn’t have to be. Please let me share some money-saving resources with you to help make incorporating STEAM into your home or classroom easy and affordable.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 11, 9:25 PM

Perfect timing! Thanks to John Evans.

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Designing for virtual reality and the impact on education | Alex Faaborg | TEDxCincinnati

Alex Faaborg shares how Virtual Reality introduces unique challenges for interface design, and opens up incredible opportunities for the future of art, journalism, and education. Virtual Reality design techniques and Google Cardboard is introduced to over 1000 TEDxCincinnati Main Stage participants.

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10 Interesting Ways to Integrate QR Codes in Your Teaching (Infographic) ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Interesting Ways to Integrate QR Codes in Your Teaching (Infographic) ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | On education | Scoop.it

Via Yuly Asencion
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Jean Marrapodi's curator insight, September 3, 8:45 AM
Great ideas for school. How could this enhance training?
Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, September 3, 9:24 AM
Great ideas for a beginning-coding needs to become more of a main dish in our curricula!
Maggie McGuirk Veres's curator insight, September 8, 3:35 PM
Good ideas.
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Personal Learning Backpack: Empower Learners using UDL Lens

Personal Learning Backpack: Empower Learners using UDL Lens | On education | Scoop.it

The Personal Learning Backpack (PLB) uses the UDL lens to define the tools, resources, strategies, and skills learners will need to support learning.


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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, September 6, 11:45 AM

This is part 2 of a 3 part series on how to use the UDL Lens  of Access, Engage and Express to develop agency with each learner. Discover how you can create a PLB with your learners so that they develop the skills to support their own learning.

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Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) :: United Nations

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) :: United Nations | On education | Scoop.it
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or Global Goals, guide development policy and funding through 2030, beginning with a pledge to end poverty. Everywhere. Permanently.

Via Jim Lerman
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“The fun they had” or about the quality of MOOC | Ghislandi | Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society

“The fun they had” or about the quality of MOOC

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The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix

The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix | On education | Scoop.it


Earlier this week, Oxford's Bodleian Library announced that it had digitized a 550 year old copy of the Gutenberg Bible along with a number of other ancient bibles, some of them quite beautiful. Not to be outdone, the British Library came out with its own announcement on Thursday:

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The Landing: Connectivism: a learning theory or a theory of how to learn?

The Landing: Connectivism: a learning theory or a theory of how to learn? | On education | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Adriana Guerrero López's curator insight, April 28, 2014 4:07 PM

Artículo interesante: ¿realmente el futuro del aprendizaje está en el conectivismo?. Las clases invertidas son el futuro?

Julie Cumming-Debrot's curator insight, April 29, 2014 5:10 AM

Very interesting research.  Thanks Susan for sharing this.

Lindy McKeown Orwin's comment, April 30, 2014 12:51 AM
Downes' response http://halfanhour.blogspot.ca/2014/04/response-to-dron.html
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Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning

Guide: Using the SAMR Model to Guide Learning | On education | Scoop.it

Technology is an immense tool that can transform the way students learn. One of my favourite quotes which demonstrates this comes from Steve Jobs:
 “What a computer is to me is it’s the most remarkable tool that we’ve ever come up with, and it’s the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.“



Via Nik Peachey
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Ann Middlemiss's curator insight, August 14, 2015 4:55 AM

Interesting and intuitive way of looking at how technology can enhance learning.

Maria Bañeres's curator insight, September 19, 2015 12:17 PM

Just technology!

Sebastián Vásquez's curator insight, September 21, 7:13 PM
In my opinion, substitution, argumentation, modification and redefinition (SAMR) model is a very useful tool to have into account as a starting point, or as a reference one, to start thinking about the way teachers can design lessons and the role they want technology to play into the classroom. It could also be used as a way to make students reflect upon the way they normally use technology and to make them aware of other possibilities and different ways in which they could do it. Furthermore, we can use this method as a pretext to discover others and to explore other ways in which technology could help us all to enhance teaching-learning processes.
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Longer Tweets Are Here: All You Need to Know About Twitter's 140 Character Update

Longer Tweets Are Here: All You Need to Know About Twitter's 140 Character Update | On education | Scoop.it

This update has been much anticipated by many Twitter users and on their blog, Twitter shared the full details of what’s changed:

 

"-Replies: When replying to a Tweet, @names will no longer count toward the 140-character count. This will make having conversations on Twitter easier and more straightforward, no more penny-pinching your words to ensure they reach the whole group.

 

"-Media attachments: When you add attachments like photos, GIFs, videos, polls, or Quote Tweets, that media will no longer count as characters within your Tweet. More room for words!

 

"-Retweet and Quote Tweet yourself: We’ll be enabling the Retweet button on your own Tweets, so you can easily Retweet or Quote Tweet yourself when you want to share a new reflection or feel like a really good one went unnoticed.

 

"-Goodbye, .@: These changes will help simplify the rules around Tweets that start with a username. New Tweets that begin with a username will reach all your followers. (That means you’ll no longer have to use the ”.@” convention, which people currently use to broadcast Tweets broadly.) If you want a reply to be seen by all your followers, you will be able to Retweet it to signal that you intend for it to be viewed more broadly."


Via Jim Lerman
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 19, 6:01 PM

There's considerably more...check the whole article.

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36 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 2)

36 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class (Part 2) | On education | Scoop.it
In continuation of last week’s article, Part 1: 44 Smart Ways to Use Smartphones in Class, here is a new list of thirty-six additional ideas to help leverage the power of these tech gadgets in the learning environment. In this blog post, I have attempted to avoid any redundancies, and I sincerely hope my endeavors were successful. Please join me in helping educators everywhere creatively use smartphones by contributing any overlooked uses and supportive responses via this survey. The shared comments can easily be assessed by clicking this link.

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floursnotty's comment, September 8, 11:23 PM

Breathtaking...!!
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8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started

8 Basic Steps Of Project-Based Learning To Get You Started | On education | Scoop.it

"The process of designing and implementing project-based learning can be fairly complex. A big part of that complexity is the shift toward inquiry that uncovers learning as you use PBL to flip Bloom’s Taxonomy. With that said, it’s often helpful to break this process down into basic steps to help teachers and schools get started with the caveat that PBL planning and implementation is not a simple, linear process. Readers should keep in mind that some of these “steps” can occur simultaneously as the reality of the messiness of learning and planning for deeper learning kicks in."


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Helen Teague's curator insight, September 24, 8:55 AM
Resources from TeachThought are always reliable.
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Student-Centered Learning Can Modernize Schools - Education Week :: Nicholas C. Donohue

Student-Centered Learning Can Modernize Schools - Education Week :: Nicholas C. Donohue | On education | Scoop.it
The notion that we can "fix" our schools to create more-equitable outcomes for these students only moves us backward. It implies that our education system is broken. In reality, the system is working exactly as it was intended when public education was designed over 100 years ago. It is culling and sorting the more elite students and leaving the rest to work the factories or the farms.


"We can no longer afford winners and losers in our schools. Instead, we need to redesign education in high schools to move it forward and away from that 19th-century model.

 

"Today, schools and communities across the country are advancing a framework known as student-centered learning, which questions traditional concepts of where, when, and how learning happens. This innovative approach is not restricted to the traditional classroom. Rather than simply sitting through lectures, students use class time for interactive projects and thoughtful discourse. Learners complete internships for credit and run their own parent-teacher conferences. They advance by demonstrating understanding of material at their own pace, rather than by accruing credits based on the "seat time" they've endured at a desk."


Via Jim Lerman
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 13, 3:40 PM

I believe Donohue may have a key to unlocking the "mystery" of why making high schools truly high functioning seems so difficult.

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When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | #LEARNing2LEARN #LEARNingByDoing

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | #LEARNing2LEARN #LEARNingByDoing | On education | Scoop.it
“When we have a rich meta-strategic base for our thinking, that helps us to be more independent learners,” said Project Zero senior research associate Ron Ritchhart at a Learning and the Brain conference. “If we don’t have those strategies, if we aren’t aware of them, then we’re waiting for someone else to direct our thinking.”

Helping students to “learn how to learn” or in Ritchhart’s terminology, become “meta-strategic thinkers” is crucial for understanding and becoming a life-long learner. To discover how aware students are of their thinking at different ages, Ritchhart has been working with schools to build “cultures of thinking.” His theory is that if educators can make thinking more visible, and help students develop routines around thinking, then their thinking about everything will deepen.

His research shows that when fourth graders are asked to develop a concept map about thinking, most of their brainstorming centers around what they think and where they think it. “When students don’t have strategies about thinking, that’s how they respond – what they think and where they think,” Richhart said. Many fifth graders start to include broad categories of thinking on their concept maps like “problem solving” or “understanding.” Those things are associated with thinking, but fifth graders often haven’t quite hit on the process of thinking.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Lina Kherfan's curator insight, April 3, 8:19 PM
this article talks about the importance of how children think and learn. the author stresses on the fact that for better learning, students need to have a better structure for learning, hence the title. the author states students often do not have a good structure for thinking. students tend just to memorize things and don't know how to do deep learning. the author states that teachers only teach one part of this structure. which is thinking about thinking. the structre for better thinking is not only thinking about thinking though, there is more to it. the only part of it is to monitoring and directing thinking. " When a student is reading and stops to realize he’s not really understanding the meaning behind the words, that’s monitoring. And most powerfully, directing thinking happens when students can call upon specific thinking strategies to redirect or challenge their own thinking."  monitoring is being able to check up on yourself and regulate your own learning and directing is when students can take charge of their learning and direct it to what works for them in their self learning. this article talks about the importance of deeper thinking and learning and then switches to how educators can help with the process. i chose this article because i think that it is an important thing for students in K-12 grades. in my highschool, my graduating year, they had put in place a program called common core, which emphasizes this specific topic in student learning. sadly i was not able to partake in it however i do think that it is important for incoming students learn how to think and learn deeper.
Melissa Vee Rentchler 's curator insight, April 4, 4:17 PM
When we have a rich meta-strategic base for our thinking, that helps us to be more independent learners,” said Project Zero senior research associate Ron Ritchhart at a Learning and the Brain conference. “If we don’t have those strategies, if we aren’t aware of them, then we’re waiting for someone else to direct our thinking.”

Helping students to “learn how to learn” or in Ritchhart’s terminology, become “meta-strategic thinkers” is crucial for understanding and becoming a life-long learner. To discover how aware students are of their thinking at different ages, Ritchhart has been working with schools to build “cultures of thinking.” His theory is that if educators can make thinking more visible, and help students develop routines around thinking, then their thinking about everything will deepen.

His research shows that when fourth graders are asked to develop a concept map about thinking, most of their brainstorming centers around what they think and where they think it. “When students don’t have strategies about thinking, that’s how they respond – what they think and where they think,” Richhart said. Many fifth graders start to include broad categories of thinking on their concept maps like “problem solving” or “understanding.” Those things are associated with thinking, but fifth graders often haven’t quite hit on the process of thinking.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

 

reflectin gsunny's comment, August 23, 6:44 AM
Breathtaking...!!
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Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice :: National Academies Press

Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice :: National Academies Press | On education | Scoop.it
Bullying has long been tolerated as a rite of passage among children and adolescents. There is an implication that individuals who are bullied must have "asked for" this type of treatment, or deserved it. Sometimes, even the child who is bullied begins to internalize this idea. For many years, there has been a general acceptance and collective shrug when it comes to a child or adolescent with greater social capital or power pushing around a child perceived as subordinate. But bullying is not developmentally appropriate; it should not be considered a normal part of the typical social grouping that occurs throughout a child's life.

Although bullying behavior endures through generations, the milieu is changing. Historically, bulling has occurred at school, the physical setting in which most of childhood is centered and the primary source for peer group formation. In recent years, however, the physical setting is not the only place bullying is occurring. Technology allows for an entirely new type of digital electronic aggression, cyberbullying, which takes place through chat rooms, instant messaging, social media, and other forms of digital electronic communication.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, September 6, 5:26 PM

FREE DOWNLOAD

The book is still in pre-publication (9/4/16), but you can download it for free here.

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Learner Empowerment

Learner Empowerment | On education | Scoop.it
A major theme during the Educon 2.8 conference in Philadelphia during the last week of January, 2016, was learner empowerment. Here is a Storify of tweets about empowerment from the conference: https://storify.com/jackiegerstein/what-conditions-are-necessary-for-empowerment-in-s. ; Highlighted Tweets include . . . The conference and Twitter discussions motivated me to write this post on learner empowerment. Thomas and Velthouse…


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Empowering



Via Gust MEES
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Tony Guzman's curator insight, February 16, 1:12 PM

This article recaps one of major themes shared at EduCon 2016 in January 2016: Learner Empowerment.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 16, 4:07 PM

Learner Empowerment | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...

Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, September 6, 12:20 AM
Participate in discussion with other registered students at Educity Forum, which is segregated topic wise. discuss AT  http://ow.ly/h3Bs303VqDX
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Never Too Young To Code

Never Too Young To Code | On education | Scoop.it
Coding brings young children rich opportunities for language development and the “notion of learning from mistakes,” says Chip Donohue, the dean of distance learning and continuing education at the Erikson Institute in Chicago, a graduate school in child development. “We actually don’t do enough of that with young kids.” The sequencing and patterns involved in programming reinforce skills that have always been taught in the early years, but now also create “habits of mind that are essential for the 21st century,” adds Donohue, also senior fellow at the Fred Rogers Center, which provides resources and information on media use with young children. When children code together, they are also learning from each other.


“In the process of learning to code, people learn many other things. They are not just learning to code, they are coding to learn,” Mitchel Resnick, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, wrote in an EdSurge article. “In addition to learning mathematical and computational ideas (such as variables and conditionals), they are also learning strategies for solving problems, designing projects, and communicating ideas.” Resnick adds that these skills are useful to everyone “regardless of age, background, interests, or occupation.”


Via Jim Lerman
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