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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Blue Sky Change
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4 Steps for Starting Change Management.

4 Steps for Starting Change Management. | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
Effective Change Management starts with leaders who practice positive thinking. More powerful results occur with optimistic focus and awareness.

Via Blue Sky Change
Renee Gibbins's insight:

Some of this sounds a bit airy fairy but it has a lot of good points. I believe in the circle of behaviour whereby changing our own behaviour influences the behaviour of those around us. Our Department is going through a huge change and my goal is to end up being in charge of a corporate unit in the Mining Department and change is something we will always need to have a grasp on. I need to better learn to change myself and influence change in others as well as being able to drive and lead change throughout the organisation.

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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Blue Sky Change
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4 Steps for Starting Change Management.

4 Steps for Starting Change Management. | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
Effective Change Management starts with leaders who practice positive thinking. More powerful results occur with optimistic focus and awareness.

Via Blue Sky Change
Renee Gibbins's insight:

Some of this sounds a bit airy fairy but it has a lot of good points. I believe in the circle of behaviour whereby changing our own behaviour influences the behaviour of those around us. Our Department is going through a huge change and my goal is to end up being in charge of a corporate unit in the Mining Department and change is something we will always need to have a grasp on. I need to better learn to change myself and influence change in others as well as being able to drive and lead change throughout the organisation.

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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Sustain Our Earth
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Surge in coal industry accidents spurs online safety initiative | MINING.com

Surge in coal industry accidents spurs online safety initiative | MINING.com | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
The Queensland coal sector saw a surge in mining-related accidents and injuries in 2012.

Via SustainOurEarth
Renee Gibbins's insight:

A "disturbing rise in dangerous behaviour in underground coal mines" - the reason that the safety industry should be regulated with experience AND an actual qualification in mining in Queensland. Currently most safety staff on mine sites in Queensland have jobs based on experience, not qualifications. Whilst experience is extremely important, sometimes the correct training joined with experience is what could actually help combat the issues that are on the rise within this industry, particularly in Queensland where mining is such a large industry.

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Israel Uriondo's curator insight, March 15, 2016 10:46 PM

Working to minimize risk in the workplace is one my main objectives and it is what I see myself doing in the nearest future specially in the mining industry. This is why I am currently studying Health & Safety, so I can gain knowledge and help prevent accidents because everyone deserves to feel safe at work. Mining is where I strive to be because in the future because there are so many hazards such as toxicity, big machinery, objects falling, etc. 

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More pressure on The Reef: $16 billion coal mine for Qld to be built in the Galilee Basin

billion coal mine for Queensland The Carmichael coal mine could become the largest in Australia after it received conditional approval to be built in the...
Renee Gibbins's insight:

This news article goes to show that Queenslanders find this is news! Coal Mines are looked as environmental disasters waiting to happen, our department is looked down upon from an environmental perspective even though they don't realise a completely different department administers the Environmental Protection Act to protect the land people want to defend. They forget that the Queensland coal industry raises the money to allow schools, hospitals and roads to be built, this industry keeps Queensland alive, in jobs, towns kept going due to the coal industry. It is my wish to drive the change in Queensland to show that mining isn't the negative industry so many people think it is and to ensure the safety of all those working in the mines and those affected by the mining industry.

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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Healthy office
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Sit–stand desks in call centres: Associations of use and ergonomics awareness with sedentary behavior


Via SIT
Renee Gibbins's insight:

Sit-stand is a fairly new concept in our organisation and whilst we do not operate a call centre a lot of our work is computer based and we spend a lot of time sitting in front of computers not moving. We have started offering staff the opportunity to have a standing desk, as well as installing tall tables in our outdoor areas where informal conferences and meetings can be held to change it up a little bit. This article touches on the statistics but still says that sedentary behaviour cannot be fixed with awareness, but supportiveness from management with provision of the right equipment is definitely a step in the right direction.

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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Corporate Culture and OD
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Changing How You Lead Change

Changing How You Lead Change | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
Guest post by Jodie Nevid

Leading change is one of the most common problems leaders face.
There is a common misconception that people fear change, however it is rarely “change” itself that people fear. Fears are often related to people’s identify, comfort zones and beliefs. Learning to work with those three things can change everything.
Dilts’ Neurological Levels Pyramid is a great tool for leaders to explore because it can be a fantastic guide to leading change.
Let’s look at the 7 levels from bottom up:
Level 1 – Environment
When people are unhappy, the environment is often our first port of call. It could be the job, the organisation, the team, or even the location of a desk. There is an assumption that a change in environment will create an increase in happiness. Not so, because we take our unhappy selves with us! New workstations rarely solve the real issues.
Level 2 – Behaviour

When environmental change fails to lift morale, the logical place to improve seems to be behaviour. I see this done through team charters, agreed behaviours or a code of conduct. This can work, however it rarely sticks because people slip back to old ways. Frustration increases and we knock on the door of level three.
Level 3 – Skills
Frustration with a team’s failed attempt to live the charter often has leaders pulling out their hair, asking what it takes to get commitment. “Argh…It must be a skills gap!” An investment in training goes ahead, and if done well, improvements from some but not all take place. However, it is often only on the surface, because as we know, new skills don’t always stick!
Level 4 – Beliefs
All the skills in the world are no match for deep seeded limiting beliefs. Thoughts like ‘I could never do or say that’, or ‘that would never work here’ always come back to bite. This is where hope takes a hit and confusion sets in because when leaders have put their team through these steps all they can ask is, “Why doesn’t anything stick?”
It’s simple; if people don’t truly believe change is possible, their subconscious mind will continue to sabotage their own progress. Warning: trying to change someone’s beliefs can be incredibly difficult. Their beliefs are their truths. Don’t try to dissolve them – understand how they got there, because there’s usually a very logical reason!
Level 5 – Values
When you can find congruence between one’s values and the desired change, everything is easier. One of the best questions you can learn to ask your staff is “What really matters to you?” People become annoyed when they don’t feel understood or respected.
When you explore people’s values you can also look at their character strengths. The things people do well are most likely related to the things they hold valuable; it probably has some value in relation to the change as well.
Level 6 – Identity
When someone is in a resistant state I will focus the conversation back on them. “What do you believe to be true about yourself?” Is a great question and the answer can be challenging and enlightening as it shifts thought patterns.
A leader’s time is best spent coaching people to look within. Don’t make the mistake of waiting until after the fire when everyone is burnt. Teach people to find courage in ownership of their identity and give them the tools to change it for the better if they want to. Change can come quickly when people change the way they see themselves.
Level 7 – Purpose
In his book Drive, Daniel Pink identifies the three main motivators for people as: autonomy, mastery and purpose. The peak of Dilt’s pyramid is about that which is greater than self.
When people feel connected to a sense of purpose they will move heaven and earth. In fact, it is a connection to purpose that often gets in the way of change. When I ask people why they are resisting change, they often tell me they perceive the change as a threat to their purpose.
Experience has taught me that change is easier and faster when you start with conversations at the top of the pyramid. It has also taught me that most teams and organisations get bogged down at levels 1, 2 and 3. As you lead your people through the next change, why not take the short cut? It just might change the way you lead people through change!

Jodie Nevid is an international speaker, coach, consultant, facilitator and business owner who has worked with thousands of leaders across Australia and New Zealand. Jodie regularly speaks at conferences focused on self-development, personal growth, leadership and high performance. You can read more great articles by Jodie on her blog at The 7 Effect.
You may also be interested in joining AIM in Adelaide for the Women in Management High Tea on Thursday 14 August, where Jodie will be discussing the road less travelled.








Via Anne Leong, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Alexis Assimacopoulos
Renee Gibbins's insight:

I currently work for a Queensland Government Department who are undergoing massive change. I have recently put together a presentation on how to work better as an effective team. After reading this article I have realised I'm stuck at level 2. I eventually want to end up managing a corporate unit where I have control of all elements of our business including Health and Safety, Human Resources and Finance.

 

To be able to take control of such a unit I need to move past level two and I believe these steps and levels detailed here are a great snapshot to begin that journey.

 

I have clear knowledge of what our units purpose is but need to find a way to link that back to each staff member to assist us through a huge culture shift and drive the change in our workforce from within.

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Queensland mines and quarries safety performance and health report 2012-2013 | Mining and safety | Queensland Government

Renee Gibbins's insight:

You can see from this report that whilst fatalities were up in Queensland mining all other areas were down in 2012-2013. I'd like to see less "control measure" put in place and more ways to completely eradicate these issues. So much of the mining industry is based around what has been done historically but there is so much technology that can be used to remove some of the risks and issues that cause injuries and deaths.

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Most FIFO families cope well

Most FIFO families cope well | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
Communities where many fly-in, fly-out workers live are not getting the full benefits of the resources boom when they return home, a new report says.

Via Peter Mellow
Renee Gibbins's insight:

Another issue with the mining industry - that everyone is Fly-In-Fly-Out (FIFO) this article supports that FIFO doesn't cause problems with families however can aggravate them, however that can be similar to many other types of industries. Whilst I don't support FIFO because I think that small communities need to be nurtured from the money that can be raised by a large scale mining operation I think that we can put in place more control measures to help those that live in a FIFO family and help support them more to ensure that this doesn't continue in a downward spiral.

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Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from OH&S in mining: Making people happier, safer and healthier.
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Improving safety and productivity in coal mines | CSIRO

Improving safety and productivity in coal mines | CSIRO | OHS_Quest 1_Renee_Gibbins | Scoop.it
CSIRO’s innovative underground longwall automation technology is increasing efficiency and protecting lives.

Via Jackie Kelly, Zoe Taylor
Renee Gibbins's insight:

The mining industry makes up a lot of Queensland's revenue for building schools, roads and hospitals. Our Department oversees the granting of mining leases from exploration through to production. The CSIRO's steps in making underground mining more safe have helped a lot but there is so much more headway we can make with automated services and other control measures along the way. It is great to know that Australia is leading the way with safety in the mining industry and we can only go from strength to strength.

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Zoe Taylor's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:59 AM

Yet another link between safety and productivity. It's nice to know that australia is leading the way when it comes to safety in big mining.

Jackie Kelly's curator insight, March 13, 2014 7:07 AM

Another excellent example of how business and OHS science is coming together to develop solutions that will make work sites safer for people and at the same time, increase productivity and profits.

 

I would love to see some of these technologies migrate to the civil construction industries where the risk of contact between people and moving plant is an extremely high risk.  It is one that we closely manage in our day to day operations.  I hope I never loose my natural fear of the big pieces of equipment!

Rescooped by Renee Gibbins from Workplace health and wellbeing
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Mental Health First Aid in the Workplace

Mental Health is an often forgotten aspect of overall wellness.  With increasing personal and workplace pressures, it is being recognized as a very serious concern.

 

Employee assistance programs in many organizations are there to assist.


Via Tammy Gedak
Renee Gibbins's insight:

Mental Health in the workplace is definitely an overlooked aspect of overall wellness in the workplace. Many organisations do offer an Employee Assistance Program, mine included, however whilst there is assured confidentiality there is an element of feeling that using the program is a weakness that could be used against you. I continually encourage people, from a HR perspective to utilise the program and I know that some do use it but if everyone in the office could be more open and accepting that some people deal with pressures of work/life balance differently we might be able to lose the negativity that is associated with utilising such a program within the workplace.

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