OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026
52 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Emma Abbott from OHS
Scoop.it!

Store Person- Risk Management & Prevention Guidance- Model Code of Practice - Managing the Work Environment and Facilities - Safe Work Australia

Store Person- Risk Management & Prevention Guidance- Model Code of Practice - Managing the Work Environment and Facilities - Safe Work Australia | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it
This site contains materials supporting the WHS laws including; the model WHS Act, model WHS Regulations and model Codes of Practice. Analysis of data and research relating to work health and safety and workers’ compensation is available from this site.

Via Nick Maidment's OHS Quest
Emma Abbott's insight:

Loved this one from Nick Maidment!

more...
Nick Maidment's OHS Quest's curator insight, May 3, 2014 12:10 AM

The workplace environment of which any person works can have severe consequence that leads to incidents and injuries. Consultation with the general Store Person census, determined the risks associated with housekeeping as highest priority:

 

In a warehouse environment, high activity areas are consistently changing and the requirement to restore the workplace to a safe condition requires the need of continuous housekeeping. Poor housekeeping can increase the risk of slip, trips and falls which are some of the most common risks associated to a workplace environment. The aim of ‘good housekeeping’ in a warehouse environment is to maintain an exceptional state of order and regularity. Stock piling of material for later use or removal is undertaken as good housekeeping practice, generally waste management strategies are utilised to help reduce associated risk. In the warehouse, issues of poor housekeeping generally arise when ‘stock’, is stored in a fashion that either creates a new hazard or contributes to another.  Locations of materials play a key role, and should be considered, items are required to be stored free from access and egress areas. If hazardous materials or goods are stored, suitable locations, as determined by manufacturer’s specifications and Safety Data Sheets, should be adhered to. Stockpiling of goods must be done with a holistic approach of a risk assessment attitude 'what new risks have been introduced? & what can be done prevent or control the new risks?’. Further information and guidance is provided by Safework Australia, found within the material above.

Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

setting-up-workstation.pdf

Emma Abbott's insight:

This is a very well written practical guide to setting up your workstation correctly. I think the diagrams will really help my Damsel in Distress to visualise the way she can improve the ergonomics of her office.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

Officewise_OHS1_Apr_10.pdf

Emma Abbott's insight:

This a great little offering from Comcare! Focussing on a hazard management approach, it gives workers some useful tools and provides pointers on where to look for further information. One part I thought would be very useful for my damsel in distress is the section on psychosocial workplace safety.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

5 Minutes with...Mechanic, Panelbeater, Tow Truck Driver, Owner Builder, Member of the Light Horse Assosciation, Machinery Operator, Uni Student and my husband (his most dangerous occupation of all...

5 Minutes with...Mechanic, Panelbeater, Tow Truck Driver, Owner Builder, Member of the Light Horse Assosciation, Machinery Operator, Uni Student and my husband (his most dangerous occupation of all... | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it

Time in Job:

15 years as a mechanic (and as owner of own business for 6)

4 years as a panelbeater

16 years operating large machinery

30 years riding horses recreationally

16 years in a relationship with my wife (married for 9)

 

Main job duties:

Repairs to trucks, mainly smash jobs.

Owning and driving my own tow truck, as well as driving the truck owned by my employer

Own and operate bobcat, excavator, dozer.

Horse riding as a recreational sport including membership of the Australian Light Horse

Recreational motorbike riding

Keeping my wife in one piece:)

 

Describe some of the OHS issues in your workplace:

Heavy lifting is a major issue - I have already suffered from a prolapsed disc in my lower spine.

Working with oil and chemicals (spray paint and fibreglass are the main issues)

Working in confined spaces inside cabin and tippers

 

Operating heavy machinery has its own risks - chances of rolling over on uneven ground; loading and unloading machinery on trucks is particularly risky

 

Fatigue - it takes a surprising amount of physical and mental strength to operate a machine for lengthy periods in hot and confined cabs.

 

One danger of owner building your own house and shed is working at heights, with falls a distinct issue.

 

Horse riding is a dangerous sport, horses have a mind of their own and sometimes they are not thinking on the same lines you! Falling off is not a matter of if but a matter of when - I had a nasty fall several years ago where I was pinned under my horse in the surf at the beach.

 

One of my toughest jobs is keeping my wife in one piece - she likes to do all the same things I do and often gets into trouble doing them:)

 

What have you done to reduce the risks of these hazards:

I think I work and play as safely as I can, I will wear a height harness when working on the roof of my shed or house when I am building.

 

I wear a back brace at work to help my back.

 

Take regular rest and drink breaks whilst operating machinery and building.

 

Always operate to log book hours when driving to minimise the issue of fatigue.

Emma Abbott's insight:

Will leads a hectic life and has a wide variety of occupations and recreational pursuits, all with their own particular OHS issues and risks/hazards. Will is reasonably safety conscious but tends to focus on getting the task done to the detriment of his health at times.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

5 Minutes With...Bridge Construction Officer (Crane Operator)

5 Minutes With...Bridge Construction Officer (Crane Operator) | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it

Job Title:

Bridge Construction Officer(Crane Operator) in Councils Bridge Maintenance and Construction Crew

 

Time in Job:

15 years in Council (35 years total experience operating cranes).

 

Main Job Duties:

Operating Councils Franna Crane

Driving and operating the Hiab Crane on Councils Bridge Truck

Construction and Repair of Councils Timber and Concrete Bridges

Assembling concrete bridge structures

Shifting formwork

Testing and inspection of bridges in the network

Scaffolding as required

 

Describe some of the OHS issues in your workplace:

*The tools of our trade; we are required to use chainsaws, pnuematic and electric drills. oxy-acetylene equipment, generators etc in challenging and difficult circumstances on a daily basis. Our drills do not have clutches and can grab in timber quickly and literally throw you off the timber, scaffolding or ladder you are standing on. In addition our crane is undersized for the work required of it, which means in order to keep within it's SWL we often have to drive into more precarious positions than I feel entirely comfortable with in order to complete the tasks given.

 

*Working at heights; this is a daily occurrence (some of the bridges we work on can be 20m above ground height). Its not just the height but all the safety equipment you are required to wear to go with it that causes fatigue (like harness and fall arrest systems). Our council has recently introduced compulsory long pants which adds to the bulk and heat when working in this gear.

*Scaffolding - always a dangerous occupation, erecting scaffolding safely in rough conditions can be a challenge.

*Colleagues - you don't really have a say in who is working with you as employees are hired by management, and having workmates you can't trust to keep you safe hanging on to your safety tag line or swinging loads of timber around your worksite certainly adds to your job stress.

 

What have you done to reduce the risks of these hazards?:

 

Council has just purchased a new larger crane which will be able to handle the loads more effectively;

 

Other than that, the rest is just unavoidable issues with my job that I don't see how I can change them.

Emma Abbott's insight:

This works crew within Council is one of the most hazardous jobs in the organisation. These boys are working in remote,wet and slippery conditions often at heights. One of the issues which could be rectified is looking in to better quality drills and tools which will allow them to carry out their duties safely. Regular toolbox meetings and risk assessments are an important tool in keeping this crew safe. I think this crew definitely has a case to put forward for being allowed to continue to wear shorts as they are often working in water and spending long days in harnesses. Fatigue is another big issue that I feel needs addressing by either scheduling in more regular rest breaks or ensuring rotation of jobs between crew mates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

5 Minutes with... Depot Support Officer in Local Government

5 Minutes with... Depot Support Officer in Local Government | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it

Job Title:

Depot Support Officer in Council's Admin and Community Department

 

Time in Job:

3 Years

 

Main Job Duties:

Purchase Ordering; Administrative Support to Plant and Depot Co-ordinator; Assist Storeman with general duties; assist unloading freight from trucks utilising a forklift;first point of contact for the works depot.

 

Describe some of the OHS issues in your workplace:

*Long periods of time sitting

*Long periods of continual computer usage(eye strain is a big problem)

*Operation of a forklift in a depot environment

*Manual handling tasks

*Potential for conflict due to high rates of interaction with staff members from other departments.

 

What have you done to reduce the risks of these hazards?:

 

Take regular breaks (from sitting and computer use)

Stretch every hour of desk time

Volunteer to operate forklift even when not required to ensure I am capable to operate it

Completed a Council run short course on manual handling

 

Are there any issues you feel need further follow-up:

 

Yes, I would like to have some training in negotiation and conflict resolution.

Emma Abbott's insight:

Whilst an office job seems to be a fairly 'safe' occupation, there is potential for harm in many of the duties carried out in this position. According to Safe Work Australia Statistics (Safe Work Australia 2014) Office and Clerical occupations accounted for 11.7 serious injuries per 1000, which considering the nature of the work is a high number. Manual handling tasks are a particular danger, which is reflected in the fact that 21% of injuries in the clerical sector are back injuries from manual handling tasks (Deir Qld Gov 2009).

 

One hazardous component of this job is a requirement to operate a forklift truck, when the rest of the role is mostly clerical; machinery operation is something that you need to be doing regularly to keep up your skill set and infrequent operators will be more likely to have incidents.

 

In this instance, the worker has done an informal risk assessment and addressed some of the OHS issues personally, such as taking breaks and driving the forklift more regularly. Council has been proactive with organising appropriate training and this has been taken on board by the employee.

 

 

References:

 

Department of Employment and Industrial Relations Qld (2009)

Accessed 1 April 2014.

http://www.deir.qld.gov.au/workplace/documents/showDoc.html?WHS%20Publications/hospitality%20-%20clerical%20and%20administrative%20worker#.UzoGHHAwrpw

 

Safe Work Australia (2014) Acessed 1 April 2014. http://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/sites/SWA/about/Publications/Documents/841/Key-WHS-Statistics-2014.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

The most hilarious, gruesome forklift training safety video ever [video]

The most hilarious, gruesome forklift training safety video ever [video] | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it
Australian Mining brings you a fantastic, hilariously gory forklift training video from the 1980s.
Emma Abbott's insight:

This is a cracking video (despite the fact that it is in German - I think the subtitles just add to the experience!). Using humour, it gets the main safety messages across to forklift drivers about the importance of prestart checks and safe operation of forklifts (not to mention the consequences if you fail to observe them!!). I think my Damsel in distress would think this was nine minutes well spent!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

Solutions

Emma Abbott's insight:

Good practical advice on solutions for managing risks from manual handling in the workplace from Worksafe Victoria. Lots of excellent practical tips which my damsel in distress could take on board to help her get through her work day in one piece!  I like the fact that it highlights the often needed necessity of using more than one control to manage a risk.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

health_and_safety_in_the_office_guide_1319.pdf

Emma Abbott's insight:

This is a great publication from Workcover for my Damsel in Distress - Depot Support Officer. It is packed full of excellent advice on office design and managing issues such as managing air quality, lighting, ergonomics, risk management and manual handling. Albeit slightly outdated in terms of legislation referencing being written in 2004, much of the information is still relevant.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

5 Minutes with...Environmental Compliance Officer in Local Government

5 Minutes with...Environmental Compliance Officer in Local Government | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it

Job Title:

Environmental Compliance Officer in Council's Planning and Environment Department

 

Time in Job:

3 Years

 

Main Job Duties:

Compliance and Inspections - Inspect Plumbing for new Development Applications, Plumbing Permit Approvals, Inspect Onsite Sewerage Management Systems in accordance with legislative requirements, trade waste inspections.

 

Describe some of the OHS issues in your workplace:

*Dogs - these are a large issue with the onsite inspections, particularly with existing sewerage systems.

*Conflict with owners - most people aren't happy that the Council is 'invading' their space.

* Slips, trips and falls - I traverse varied terrain including hills sides, slippery grass, hidden rocks and logs in grass etc whilst doing onsite inspections.

*Working around effluent when checking scum levels in tanks

*Working around drainage trenches, which have sometimes failed bringing effluent to the surface, or have subsided creating a trip hazard.

*Fatigue - our shire is large and sparsely populated, and I regularly travel long distances solo.

*Heat and sun exposure

*Risk of snake bites - in long grass around tanks and trenches

*Working in isolation

* Vehicle not suitable for task (2wd small car)

 

What have you done to reduce the risks of these hazards:

 

*I spoke to my manager and our plant co-ordinator about the inadequacy of the office car pool vehicle for the tasks at hand, and they reworked the budgets to purchase a 4WD vehicle which would be more suitable and safer for my tasks.

*I carry a GPS Spot tracker for safety and regularly update my location to the depot through remote monitoring when I am on the road.

*I complete our work location board religiously so that everyone in the main office knows where I have gone for the day and what time to expect me back.

*I have implemented a system of notifying upcoming property owners about inspections by sending a notification letter two weeks prior and making a courtesy phone call one to two days before hand so that they are able to prepare the site and ensure any pets are locked up

*I carry a piece of poly pipe with me to all inspections where an owner will not be present as I have been threatened by dogs on several occasions.

Emma Abbott's insight:

The Compliance Officers position in local government is a diverse job. He works in a large range of workplaces and varying job sites all of which present unique OHS challenges. Interviewing our CO gave me good insight into his daily tasks. I think that the early notification system he has implemented is the biggest improvement to his safety, even though it is not required by law, it gives owners a chance to ensure the safety of the site and mitigate some of the risks our CO faces i.e. locking up dogs eliminates that risk entirely. Through this interview I was able to identify several issues that I could help address such as providing a snake bite kit in conjunction with the standard first aid kit that I supply and stock.

more...
Andrew Cross's curator insight, March 27, 2015 6:05 AM

OHS officers have that stereotype of coming into work environments and telling workers how to do their jobs when they may not have worked a day in that job their entire life. This article outlines OHS risks that the worker regularly encounters, which I think as OHS officers we can benefit from listening to staff and grading and adapting workplaces to build a team environment where the OHS officers are part of the companies culture too, and remove that stereotype from the job description. 

Scooped by Emma Abbott
Scoop.it!

5 Minutes with...Regulatory Officer in Local Government

5 Minutes with...Regulatory Officer in Local Government | OHS Quest 2 & 3 OCHS11026 | Scoop.it

Job Title:

Regulatory Officer in Council's Planning and Environment Department

 

Time in Job:

31 Years in several Councils across two states

 

Main Job Duties:

Regulatory enforcement of local laws, acts and regulations

Animal Control duties (including impounding stock, straying domestic animals and registration compliance)

Parking fines and enforcement

Abandoned vehicle recovery

Enforcing Alcohol-free zones

Managing illegal dumping

Maintenance of animal impound facility

 

Not to mention the old chestnut in every Council employees job description - "any other reasonable duties as directed"...which can mean you doing many different jobs throughout the day!

 

Describe some of the OHS issues in your workplace:

 

*Working with animals - dog bites, loose cattle, working in and around traffic when doing stray stock call-outs (especially at night), safe handling of large stock

*Conflict with members of the public when carrying out compliance activities -  I have been verbally and physically threatened, been forced to take out Apprehended Violence Orders against particularly irate people, as well as having to have a silent home number and mobile. My job has had a large impact on my private life, particularly as I live and work in a fairly small town.

*Working around traffic - this is not only an issue with animal control, but also abandoned vehicles which are usually dumped on the side of the ride and illegal dumping inspections

*Working in long grass and overgrown areas - this is a hazard in many facets of my job, including straying stock, inspecting illegal  dump sites, inspecting overgrown allotments. There is always a risk of snake bite and trip/fall hazards.

*Manual handling - lifting dogs in and out of cages, whipper-snipping

*Working in isolation regularly - our shire is large and sparsely populated.

 

What have you done to reduce the risks of these hazards?:

 

-I carry a Spot Tracker GPS locator which is remotely monitored from the Depot, and ensure that I activate it regularly when working outside the office. We also maintain a locator board and are required to check out of the office and write an approximate time of return. In addition I will text message my supervisor my next location and time of arrival when attending to several calls.

-Council has developed appropriate Traffic Control Plans for use when stock are on the roadways.

-Council has developed Safe Work Method Statements and Safe Work Procedures to ensure my day-to-day duties are carried out safely.

-All regulatory officers have completed a DPI Stocksafe course to learn how to handle large animals safely

- I will take a second officer with me if I feel that an encounter is not going to be civil

- I requested and had installed in my vehicle a monitoring camerato record exchanges with members of the public

 

Are there any issues you feel need further follow-up:

 

No not really - I think I work as safely as possible.

Emma Abbott's insight:

After 31 years in the same occupation, our regulatory officer has an in-depth knowledge of the daily risks and hazards in his position. He has done his best to mitigate the hazards he faces, especially in regards to working in isolation. The remote monitoring camera has been a worthwhile investment and gives the regulatory officer a degree of security and safety, as well as evidence in cases.

 

Good training has assisted in the employee having an excellent track record in safety, in particular completing the DPI Stocksafe course.

 

One aspect of OHS which is not given enough attention I feel is the social impact of a position such as this on an employees private life. The employee in question has had several serious threats made to his and his families personal safety, which is not acceptable in any workplace setting. I do not know what the solution is, but it is a problem faced by regulatory officers everywhere. In NSW there is currently a task force operating to increase the safety of regulatory officers and more information can be found at this website:

 

http://www.localgovernmentsafetytaskforce.com/contacts/64-nsw-local-government-rangers-a-parking-patrol-officers-taskforce-on-safety-website-launch

more...
No comment yet.