OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment
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Heat Stress | WorkSafe ACT

Heat Stress | WorkSafe ACT | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it
From 1 January 2012 the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act) has effect in the ACT, replacing the Work Safety Act 2008. The…
Tom Lewis's insight:

Valmae, the damsel in distress finds working 6-8 hour shifts in a commercial kitchen during the summer months a very hot job. With temperatures soaring outside, the kitchen can often be extremely hot thanks to all the heat producing appliances such as deep fryers and pizza ovens. It is because of this that Val is at risk of suffering from heat stress.

The symptoms of heat stress according to Work Safe Act include;

 

-          Nausea

-          Vomiting

-          Headaches

-          Weakness

 

Suffering heat stress can be prevented by following guidelines set out by Work Safe Act. These include;

 

-          Installing efficient ventilation systems

-          Ensuring air conditioning and ventilation systems are well maintained

-          Ensuring the intake or regular fluids

-          Taking rest breaks in cool areas

-          Ensuring workers are trained on how to identify the symptoms of Heat stress.

 

By implementing guidelines listed by the Work safe act, Valmae can lower the risk of her suffering from heat stroke whilst at work.   

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Commercial Kitchen Fire Safety Training - YouTube

Presented by the Colorado Springs Fire and Life Safety Consortium. Colorado Springs, CO Fire Inspector Tim Spears explains commercial kitchen prevention, saf...
Tom Lewis's insight:

For Valmae, the damsel in this situation; the possibility of a fire occurring in the kitchen during her shift is very real. The equipment in her kitchen contains quite a lot of heat. Deep fryers, pizza ovens, stove tops and hot plates all pose a fire risk.

 

The video outlines various ways to not only extinguish a fire, but also how to prevent a fire from occurring in the first place. Ways in which Val could work to limit fires from occurring in the workplace include;

 

-          Making sure fire extinguishers are up to date and close to the heat source.

-          Only using the necessary temperature required to complete the task.

-          Ensuring all cooking devices have been switched off properly.

-          Making sure fire suppression systems are maintained and working properly.

 

By taking these precautions as listed in the video, Valmae could work to limit the risk of fires in her kitchen.    

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National Standard for Manuel Handling - Safe work Australia

This report released by Safe Work Australia reflects the National Standard for Manual Handling Tasks in Australia. The report outlines a risk management process for manual tasks in order to prevent workers from suffering an injury.

Tom Lewis's insight:

My damsel, Valmae the commercial cook!

Throughout Valmaes 6-8 hour shift working as a commercial cook in a café, she is required to undertake many manual handling tasks in order to maintain food stocks in the kitchen. This often sees her lifting boxes in and out of the cold rooms, as well as carrying mop buckets filled with warm water and detergent.

 

Guidelines set out by Safe Work Australia regarding the National Standard for Manual Handling Tasks offer recommendations on how to minimalize the risk of suffering a manual handling injury. With this, if Valmae follows a few simple guidelines on how to lift correctly, she could lower her risk of injury. These recommendations include;

 

-Taking responsibility of her own health and safety.

-Comply with risk control measures as instructed and trained.

-Notifying her supervisor about any matter that might affect her ability to comply with guidelines set out in the risk management process.

 

Along with the measures set out by Safe Work Australia, if Val works to follow correct lifting procedures and works within her limits, then she will lower her risk of suffering a manual handling injury.   

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Commercial Cook

Commercial Cook | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it

Valmae Merry has spent the last thirty years of her life working as a commercial cook. Working full time in a small Café in the heart of Central Queensland, Val works 6-9 hour shifts that are consistently busy. Valmae’s job see her cooking numerous dishes, washing and packing away dishes, sweeping and mopping floors as well as packing and unpacking produce into the cold-room.

Tom Lewis's insight:

As a commercial cook, hazards that pose the greatest risk to Val include:     

 

Contact with harsh Chemicals: As part of keeping the kitchen floors spick and span, Valmae must sweep and mop the floors twice during every shift. This is to minimalize rodents from seeking out food scraps and maintain hygiene standards. In during this, Val comes into contact with harsh chemicals such as bleach and truck wash. In order to safeguard herself, PPE such as gloves and long sleeve shirts can help minimalize contact.

 

Fatigue: Besides working as a commercial cook, Val also works as a florist in her spare time. This means that majority Valmaes time is spent working which can sometimes result in Val feeling fatigued. Being in her mid-sixties and run off her feet for most of the shift, Val finds that her energy is zapped a lot quicker than that of someone perhaps in their twenties. Fatigue is a real hazard for Val. To manage this hazard Val could make sure she is having adequate sleep of a night and taking short breaks during her shift to replenish her energy.

 

Strain and Overexertion: Lifting heavy boxes in and out of the cold room to replenish food stocks within the kitchen can take quite the toll on Valmae’s body. This places Val at risk of injuring her back or overexerting herself during these lifts. In order to manage this hazard Val could seek assistance from another person to help lift stock as well as educate herself on the correct lifting procedures in order to minimalize risk.

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Horse trainer and Competitive rider

Horse trainer and Competitive rider | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it

Ashleigh Chapman lives on a small hobby farm in the central highlands region. Her property allows for her to own and train horses in which she finds no greater joy. It is this love for horses that has seen her work as a horse trainer and competitive rider. Ashleigh spends a great deal of her time tending to the horses needs and driving to produce stores to buy their feed. With over 9 years’ experience, Ashleigh’s job also entails her feeding and grooming horses, lunging horses, trimming and clipping their hoofs and participating in trail rides and barrel racing.   

Tom Lewis's insight:

With horses being such an unpredictable animal, Ashleigh faces many hazards working as a horse trainer and competitive rider. These include:  

 

Exposure to UV light: Spending majority of her day out doors, Ashleigh spends a lot of time exposed to UV light. Sun burn and skin cancer are possible hazards to Ashleigh if she doesn’t manage her exposure to UV light correctly. Wearing PPE such as sun screen, a hat, glasses and long sleeved shirts and pants are ways that Ashleigh can minimalize her exposure to UV light.

 

Falls: Horses can be startled quite easily in certain situations, it is because of this that falling off a horse poses a great risk to Ashleigh. If Ashleigh were to fall off a horse, especially at speed; than she could possibly break bones, injure her neck or cause brain damage. By wearing a helmet and being concentrated on how her horse is cooperating with her, Ashleigh could help to minimalize her risk of falling off.

 

Trample and kicks: Ashleigh trims and smooth’s her horse’s hoofs by herself. If she cutsthe hoof to short then this can cause the horse to jolt and often kick. It is with this that tramples and kicks pose a great risk to Ashleigh in her line of work. By having another person around react should the horse startle, this would work to minimalize Ashleigh’s risk of suffering serious injury.     

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Slips and Trips at the Workplace

This report released by Safe Work Australia demonstrates how to manage the risks associated with Slips and Trips in the workplace. The report focuses on the Hierarchy of controls that can be used to minimalize the risk of workers injuring themselves.  

Tom Lewis's insight:

Valmae, the Damsel in distress works 6-8 hour shifts in a café where slips and trips pose a real threat. During Vals shift she cooks a wide variety of food and it is with this that the kitchen floor can often become quite greasy and slippery. Boxes of food from the cold room often have to be brought into the kitchen in order to refill stock which also poses a trip hazard.

Guidelines set out in report

 by safe work Australia state many ways in which risks associated with slips and trips can be lowered in the workplace. By following the hierarchy of controls, Val could seek out various controls to minimalize risk. These include;

 

-          Mop the floor more regularly in order to stop the floor from becoming too greasy.

-          Improve lighting to increase visibility.

-          Wear PPE such as shoes with nonslip tread.      

-          Provide adequate drainage.

-          Use signage to warn of slippery areas.

 

Once in place, these controls could see Valmaes work areas with a lowered risk of Slipping and tripping.

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Managing Risks of Hazardous Chemicals - Safe Work Australia

This report released by Safe work Australia outlines a code of practice for managing the risks of Hazardous Chemicals. The report lists control methods such as elimination and substitution in order to minimalize the risk to workers that come into contact with hazardous chemicals.  

Tom Lewis's insight:

My damsel, Valmae comes into contact with many hazardous chemicals throughout her 6-8 hour shift. A large component of her job is cleaning and as a result of this Val often has to use heavy duty oven cleaner, truck was, bleach and detergents to keep the kitchen looking spick and span.

 

The codes of practice report on the Managing and Handling of Hazardous Chemicals lists many ways to lower the risks upon coming into contact with hazardous chemicals. As mentioned in this report, some of the controls Valmae could put in place include;

-encouraging her employer to buy premixed or diluted chemicals in order to limit manually mixing or diluting chemicals at the workplace

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- The use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, googles and face masks.

- Opting to use biodegradable, less volatile chemicals.

- Perhaps sharing the cleaning with another person on shit so one person isn’t exposed to the chemicals majority of the time.

 

By implementing some of these health and safety guidelines set out by work safety Australia, Valmae could work to manage hazardous chemicals in her workplace.  

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Barista and Check out chick

Barista and Check out chick | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it

Simone Carroll has recently migrated to Australia from Ireland. She has five years’ experience working as a barista back home and has now put her skills to use in a small café in central Queensland, working 6-9 hour shifts. Her job entails making coffee, taking customer orders, cooking fast food, serving hot food, packing fridges and mopping floors.   

Tom Lewis's insight:

As part of working in such a diverse environment, this means that Simone comes into contact with many hazards throughout her shift. Possible Hazards that pose the greatest risk to Simone include:

 

Burns: As part of making coffees, Simone spends a lot of her time working around hot liquids and steam which means that the risk of Simone being burnt is very real. Cooking fast food is also a major component of Simone’s job which means that hot oil that can often spit and burn needs to be treated with real caution on Simone’s part. From spilling hot coffee, to getting hot oil on her arm, the risk of Simone being burnt is a real hazard that causes her to remain vigilant and stay on task.

 

Manuel handling: As the café Simone works in is consistently busy, drink fridges constantly need to be refilled. Drink cartons can often be heavy and require the appropriate lifting techniques to ensure that Simone doesn’t hurt her back. Buy unpacking drinks from the carton in the cold room, Simone carries drinks individually or uses a trolley to minimize the risk of hurting her back.   

 

Slips and Trips: As with any work place, slips and trips are a very likely hazard. Working in a café there are many instances in which Simone could slip or trip. Excess water whist mopping or pools of oil on the ground from the deep fryer all pose a slipping hazard for Simone as she works throughout her shift. Cleaning up any spills, ringing the mop out properly and wearing the proper PPE are all ways in which Simone can manage this hazard.    

  

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Rigger and Dogger

Rigger and Dogger | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it

Ben Lewis works as a rigger and dogger catering for crane companies working in the mining industry. Spending most of his time working at Gregory Crinum mine, Ben with his five year working experience is quite confidant in what he does. Ben’s tasks as a rigger and dogger in the mining industry entails guiding heavy loads into position, communicating with a crane driver via hang signals, tying and untying loads, working twelve hour shifts and spending majority of the day on his feet.

Tom Lewis's insight:

Working in such a busy environment, Ben comes into contact with many hazards that pose great risk. Some of these include:

 

Heat Stroke/Dehydration: Working twelve hour shifts as a rigger and dogger in a Queensland means that you are exposed to the sun for an extended part of the day. As a result of this heatstroke and dehydration are a real hazard for people in Ben’s line of work. In order to manage this hazard, Ben should have constant access to water and maintain a regular intake of fluid.

 

Uncontrolled Movement: Being the rigger and dogger for a fifty tonne crane means that majority of the loads Ben comes into contact with can weigh several tonne. As a result of this, even the slightest of movement from a load that Ben has on the line could result in a limb being crushed or serious damage to equipment. In order to keep control of a load to minimalize movement, Ben must communicate with the crane driver clearly and place exclusion zones around areas where people could crush limbs.

 

Noise: With the mine site a very busy work place, noise is a constant hazard that can lead to industrial deafness if not managed correctly. As a result, Ben must work to maintain proper PPE standards such as ear plugs and ear muffs to prevent long term hearing loss from exposure to excessive noise.  

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Slew and Non-slew Crane Driver

Slew and Non-slew Crane Driver | OHS Quest 2&3: The Workplace Environment | Scoop.it

David Lewis owns a small Crane hire business that operates in the Central Highlands and caters to the mining industry. Operating out of Crinum mine, David has a hands on approach to his business and has spent the last ten years working as a slew and non-slew crane driver. Davids role as a slew and non-slew crane driver in the mining industry entails him operating heavy equipment in built up areas, maneuvering multiple tonne objects into place, communicating via hang signals with a rigger and dogger and driving oversized cranes on main roads.        

Tom Lewis's insight:

Some of the hazards David would come into contact with in his workplace include:

 

Driving oversized vehicles: David spends most of his time working out of a fifty tonne crane. With the bleak condition of rural roads in the central highlands, driving the oversized crane can be quite hazardous at times. By making sure that enough space is given when passing oncoming traffic, Dave can lower the risk of him showering cars in rocks as well as causing a collision.  

 

Exposure to exhaust fumes: The operating cabin of the crane that David works out of majority of the time is close to the diesel engine exhaust that powers the crane. These exhaust fumes are quite overwhelming and after long exposure can cause headaches and dizziness. With heavy loads on the hook, if David’s physical state isn’t well then he poses a threat to the workers in his area. By keeping the cabin door closed and using the air conditioner, David can help limit his exposure to diesel fumes.   

 

Contact with overhead power lines: David often finds himself doing crane jobs in built up areas. As a result of this, he is exposed to overhead power lines. If the crane jib comes into contact the power lines, this can cause serious damage to the tires and electric computer systems on the crane. By familiarizing himself as to wear overhead power lines sit and remaining vigilant, Dave can minimalize his exposure the risk of him coming into contact with high voltages of electricity.

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