OHS in the workplace
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Hazardous Manual Tasks - Department of Mines and Petroleum

Hazardous Manual Tasks - Department of Mines and Petroleum | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it
Home Page of the Department of Mines and Petroleum - http://www.dmp.wa.gov.au - The Department of Mines and Petroleum is Western Australia's lead economic development agency, advancing responsible and sustainable development of the State's resources.
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Queensland Mine Safety Framework | Mining and safety | Queensland Government

The Queensland Mine Safety Framework consultation regulatory impact statement (RIS) outlines options to amend legislation.
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Injury Prevention and Management Program helps reduce claims :: Mining and resources industry - Successfully balancing benefits for injured workers and premiums for employers

Injury Prevention and Management Program helps reduce claims :: Mining and resources industry - Successfully balancing benefits for injured workers and premiums for employers | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it
An improvement program for companies with above average levels of statutory claims has delivered a 22% reduction in statutory claim numbers. That was just one of the key successes shared at a recent Mining Industry Forum hosted by WorkCover Queensland.

The Injury Prevention and Management (IPaM) Program, a joint program between Workplace Health and Safety Queensland (WHSQ) and WorkCover Queensland, aims to equip businesses with the skills to develop and implement a safety management system.
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James Freeman's curator insight, March 17, 2:28 AM

My dream job is to become a Workplace Health and Safety Officer in the mines. To me, becoming a Workplace Health and Safety officer in the mines would be a dream come true. The job of a WHS Officer in the mines has alot of tasks and challengers one of the main challengers is ensuring all workers arrive home safely to their family and friends back home while also maintating a safe and hazardous free workplace. 

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Information Communication Technology

Information Communication Technology | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it

This is my boyfriend Daniel. He works as the ICT manager for St John Ambulance Queensland.

 

Amanda Walsh's insight:

Whilst many people would say there are little or no risks to ICT workers this is incorrect.

 

Servers: Servers are large computers that are constantly running in order to store data. As a result they can overheat very easily. This creates a risk of fire. The extra air conditioning used to keep the servers cool also poses a risk to the worker of becoming too cool.

 

Posture: ICT workers spend a lot of time sitting at a desk working on computers. If their posture or their chair is not appropriate they are at risk of developing chronic injuries.

 

Cabling: Setting up new computers involves a lot of crawling under desks. If not done carefully this can result in injury.

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ED Nurses and Doctors

ED Nurses and Doctors | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it

Hospital emergency department resuscitation bay. This resuscitation bay is found in Townsville Hospital where my friend Dr. Stephen Luke is an emergency department consultant.

Amanda Walsh's insight:

Doctors and nurses face dangers everyday, such as those posed by manual handling, working with needles and other sharp objects and aggression from patients. These dangers are compounded in the high stress environment of an emergency department resuscitation bay. Any patient who is placed in one of these bays is critically ill. Whilst the room in this picture looks to have plenty of room, it becomes very cramped once all the doctors, nurses and paramedic are crowded around the patient. The smaller space and high stress compound the risk of doctors and nurses to come to harm.

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Powerline Workers

Powerline Workers | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it

See that man at the top of the power pole? The one amongst all the high voltage powerlines? That is a very good friend of mine. Don't fall mate!

Amanda Walsh's insight:

This is a work environment with many obvious OHS issues. Below are the three biggest issues. Please note the first aid sign on the side of the truck. This lets us know the truck is carrying the first aid equipment required by OHS workplace rules and regulations.

 

Height: The height that these workers must climb in order to conduct their job is a danger. Falls from that height can be life altering or even fatal. Specialised training needs to be undertaken and safety harnesses warn.

 

Electricity: Power lines carry hundreds of thousands of volts of electricity. Touching these lines in the wrong way, without the appropriate equipment or the power turned off could lead to electric shock and in some cases death.

 

Equipment: All machinery poses an OHS risk. In this picture alone two pieces of heavy machinery and a ladder are visible. Each of these comes with its own risks and needs to be used in a safe manner by someone with the appropriate training.

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Quarry Worker

Quarry Worker | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it

My Dad is a crusher plant operator and truck driver at a stone quarry on the Gold Coast. Whilst this photo is not of the crusher plant at his work, the one pictured is almost identical to the one he operates.

 

Amanda Walsh's insight:

A quarry is an extremely dangerous place and as a result has many OHS rules and regulations in place. By adhering to these rules and regulations and having the appropriate training, quarry workers can better prevent workplace accidents and injuries.

 

Crusher: This is a whole system of conveyer belts, crushing jaws, and storage bins. The crusher is designed to move and crush thousands of tons of rock everyday. As a result the crusher is very dangerous to workers. Possibly the most dangerous action the workers are required to complete is getting inside the crushing jaw to release large rocks when they become stuck and create a blockage.

 

Machinery: Large trucks and loaders are used to transport both raw and crushed rock. This are large mine vehicles and come with the normal risks of machinery with the added dangers associated with their large size.

 

Dynamite: In order to use the rock it first needs to be broken away from the cliff and made into smaller pieces. To achieve this the cliff is blasted with dynamite. The dynamite itself poses a danger as well as the resulting projectiles created.

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Paramedics

Paramedics | OHS in the workplace | Scoop.it

 

My first paramedic clinical placement was completed at Southport Ambulance Station on the Gold Coast. Meet Jane and James, my mentors. During this placement I experienced first hand the OHS risks faced by paramedics everyday.

Amanda Walsh's insight:

Paramedics have a workplace like no other. Every job they do is completed in a new and unknown environment. As such every job comes with its own unique set of OHS issues. There are some issues however that are present in most environments.

 

Code one driving: This type of driving involves attempting to get to a very sick patient as quickly as possible. This may involve exceeding speed limits, running red lights and breaking other road laws. This is a dangerous procedure and appropriate training is required.

 

Manual handling: Paramedics are often required to lift and move patients. There are some pieces of equipment that help with these procedures and each one comes with its own risk to paramedics. Lifting and moving patients, no matter the equipment used, puts the paramedic at risk of injury, especially back injuries.

 

Fatigue: The work of paramedics is often emotionally and physically draining. Add to this that paramedics often work long hours without a break and it is easy to see that fatigue is a major issue for paramedics everywhere.

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