OHS in Paramedic Practice
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Paramedic graduates hit the road ready to save lives

Paramedic graduates hit the road ready to save lives | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
THREE fresh-faced and enthusiastic graduates of paramedic science have started work at Gladstone Ambulance Station this week.
Justine Campagna's insight:

I can't wait to start working as a qualified paramedic.

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Workplace violence against ACT paramedics, firefighters

Workplace violence against ACT paramedics, firefighters | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
New data reveals 74 incidents of workplace violence or serious injuries involving ACT emergency service workers over the past two years.
Justine Campagna's insight:

This is the harsh reality paramedics can face when dealing with their patients. One of the most important things that I've learnt throughout my degree is to firstly assess the scene for dangers before you approach the patient. There is no point putting yourself in danger and risking becoming a patient.

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Ambulance staff ‘near breaking point’ over stress and long hours

Ambulance staff ‘near breaking point’ over stress and long hours | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
The ambulance service is on the verge of “breaking down” because staff are suffering high levels of stress amid long working hours and tight targets, a new report claims today.
Justine Campagna's insight:

Stress within the ambulance service is an occupational health and safety issue. Although the profession is a very stressful and demanding job, I find it terrible to read that these paramedics are experiencing such high levels of stress that it is causing them to consider leaving their profession.

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Automated safety checklists prevent hospital-acquired infections, Stanford team finds

Automated safety checklists prevent hospital-acquired infections, Stanford team finds | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it

Pilots, astronauts and workers in other high-risk industries follow rigorous safety checklists to help them avoid hazards. Checklists have shown potential to reduce risk in health care, too, but the challenge is figuring out how to incorporate them into physicians’ and nurses’ work flow.


A Stanford team has built a solution: an automated checklist that pulls data directly from patients’ electronic medical records and pushes alerts to caregivers. The checklist, and a dashboard-style interface they used to interact with it, caused a three-fold drop in the rates of a serious type of hospital-acquired infection, the team found. The work has just been published in Pediatrics.


From our press release about the study:

“Electronic medical records are data-rich and information-poor,” said Natalie Pageler, MD, the study’s lead author. Often, the data in electronic medical records is cumbersome for caregivers to use in real time, but the study showed a way to change that, said Pageler, who is a critical care medicine specialist at the hospital and a clinical associate professor of pediatrics. “Our new tool lets physicians focus on taking care of the patient while automating some of the background safety checks.”


Working in the pediatric intensive care unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, the researchers focused on bloodstream infections that occur via central lines, which are catheters inserted in major veins. The automated alerts were designed to help physicians and nurses follow an established set of best practices for caring for central lines. For example, alerts were generated when the dressing on a patient’s central line was due to be changed.


The drop in the rate of central line infections – from 2.6 to 0.7 infections per 1,000 days of central line use – not only protected patients from harm; it also saved money. The team estimated that the savings in the pediatric intensive care unit were about $260,000 per year.


Next, the researchers hope to adapt the automated checklists to other uses, such as helping to guide the recovery of patients who have received organ transplants.

- See more at: http://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2014/02/24/automated-safety-checklists-prevent-hospital-acquired-infections-stanford-team-finds/#sthash.g2pYygq4.dpuf



Via nrip
Justine Campagna's insight:

What a great way to improve health and safety within hospitals!

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Union airs Gympie Hospital ambulance ramping fears - ABC Online

Union airs Gympie Hospital ambulance ramping fears - ABC Online | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
Union airs Gympie Hospital ambulance ramping fears ABC Online The Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service denies the union's claim and says it has a close working relationship with the Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) to prioritise admission...
Justine Campagna's insight:

There is definitely a lot of pressure on the Queensland Health system to meet the health demands of our ever growing population.

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Benefits of A Healthy Lifestyle: Importance of Diet and Exercise

Benefits of A Healthy Lifestyle: Importance of Diet and Exercise | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
A healthy lifestyle should be a way of living, and not just a temporary fix for a cold or to negate a gluttonous weekend. Once you get into the habit of maintaining a healthy routine, you will be able to see, feel, and experience ...
Justine Campagna's insight:

Living a healthy lifestyle is so important!

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Workplace Health and Safety

Informative video on examples of hazards from a variety of work place settings and tips for identifying potential problems as part of your workplace OH&S. Pu...
Justine Campagna's insight:

This video points out a number of hazards within different workplaces. Occupational health and safety needs to be recognised by employers and employees to avoid injury or death.

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Lack of Sleep: What It Does to Your Brain

Lack of Sleep: What It Does to Your Brain | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
Behind the controls of the Metro-North train that derailed in New York earlier this week was a tired driver, according to new reports that engineer William Rockefeller fell asleep at the wheel.
Could lack of sleep cause such a fatal mistake?

Via Thomas Faltin
Justine Campagna's insight:

It is so important that paramedics get enough sleep between shifts. This article shows the effects fatigue can have on your brain. Paramedics make life or death decisions every day so their brain needs to be functioning at its best. Fatigue is a major safety issue that can impact the lives of everyone within the workplace.

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Four hurt in six-vehicle highway smash - Ninemsn

Four hurt in six-vehicle highway smash - Ninemsn | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
Four hurt in six-vehicle highway smash
Ninemsn
Bruce Highway at Murrumba Downs will be blocked on the southbound lanes for hours as emergency services work to remove the heavy vehicle.
Justine Campagna's insight:

Unfortunately too many people lose their lives or are seriously injured on our roads each year.        

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Paramedics the most trustworthy - The North West Star

Paramedics the most trustworthy - The North West Star | OHS in Paramedic Practice | Scoop.it
Paramedics the most trustworthy
The North West Star
THEY work on the front line and see us at our worst, so it's no surprise paramedics are considered the most trustworthy professionals in Australia.
Justine Campagna's insight:

This article highlights how much trust the Australian community has for paramedics. It pushes me to be the best paramedic I can be so that I can deliver the most appropriate care to my patients. I want to be a paramedic that my patients can trust to help them when they need it the most.

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