"Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations)
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Saab 340 MSA - Australia

Saab 340 MSA - Australia | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Saab 340 MSA – a medium range multi role aircraft for Maritime Security, Search And Rescue (SAR) and transport.
Matt Day's insight:

Originally the SAAB340 aircraft was designed and built to perform as a regional turboprop and has done so successfully in Australia with various operators since approx 1986. 

 

SAAB Aerospace has modified the original Concept of the aircraft and has released various models for both Government (AWACS) and Civilian Use (Short to Medium Haul Freighter).

 

The MSA Platform is a new offering for the aircraft which might see Australian shores. As many pilots are already endorsed on the Aircraft Type in Australia, a hurdle for any new operator would be finding and training crew who are experienced and prepared to operate the aircraft safely at low level and also to overcome the challenges that Long Mission Search and Rescue may present.

 

As I am interested in this type of operation I am hopeful this aircraft will make it to Australian Skies.

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Determining cause of Asiana crash could take years

Determining cause of Asiana crash could take years | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
As officials try to piece together what led to the Asiana Flight 214 crash, investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board will analyze air-traffic control records, weather, aircraft maintenance and the crew's actions from data recorders aboard the plane.
Matt Day's insight:

Aviation related personnel would have most certainly heard of this accident. This well written article enforces that fact that many variables existed and many events were triggered in order for the accident to eventuate. 

 

Does this accident fall simply into the Swiss Cheese Model for Accident Causation or does the overall blame lay with the flight crew?

 

As Chesley Sullenberger mentions (Captain of United Airlines Flight 1549 and owner of Safety Reliability Methods) the damage may have been mitigated if the runway had been moved (Threshold Displaced) from the sea wall.

 

Many Air Transport Operators have strict Stable Approach Criteria that have to be met by a committal altitude or the approach must be discontinued and a missed approach commenced immediately as this would be the safest option. Watching the below YouTube footage issued by the NTSB indicates that the approach falls short of meeting stable approach criteria and a missed approach should have been commenced earlier.

 

I will wait for the official report as there may have been other factors at play.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MFPSfGoT1U

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Rex backs RAAA calls for fair go for regionals | Australian Aviation

Rex backs RAAA calls for fair go for regionals | Australian Aviation | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Rex has backed calls from the RAAA for a more balanced fuel levy system. (Seth Jaworski) Regional Express says it fully supports calls by the Regional
Matt Day's insight:

I may be biased by Scooping this article and providing my insight. However I do believe in what Rex and the RAAA are calling for and that Australian Airlines are treated unfairly under the current fuel levy scheme.

 

Even though the Carbon Tax is now scrapped and the fuel levy scheme is reduced by two thirds, Australian Airlines will still pay a hefty amount in fuel levy to the Australian Government for the ongoing funding of CASA (Civil Aviation Safety Authority), however all International Foreign Airlines are exempt from paying this levy even though they may operate in Australia.

 

CASA's motto is "Safe Skies for All", and they do provide assistance and safety guidance to foreign airlines when operating in Australia.

 

I think It would be much fairer to somehow work out a system that all airlines (Foreign or Australian) that operate in Australia support CASA financially through the fuel levy scheme and not just place the $120 million burden on just Australian Airlines.

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PICTURES: Air New Zealand takes delivery of first Boeing 787-9 - 7/9/2014 - Flight Global

PICTURES: Air New Zealand takes delivery of first Boeing 787-9 - 7/9/2014 - Flight Global | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Article
Matt Day's insight:

Costing a staggering $32 Billion dollars to develop, the Boeing 787 family was not a cheap aircraft to design and build.

 

The aircraft is cutting edge in every way, from its lower cruise cabin altitude and increased cabin humidity thus making the ride less tiresome and much more comfortable to its entire carbon fiber body.

Before Boeing could develop its own the 787 project used so much carbon fiber on testing and its prototype there was a worldwide shortage on carbon fiber.

 

A lot of people in the Aviation Industry had the 787 doomed to fail, especially after the fleet was grounded shortly after launch with the potential safety risks and problems with its new lithium-ion batteries. 

 

However with only 162 air-frames delivered (161 787-8 Variants and the only 787-9 Variant which is pictured above for Air New Zealand) the 787 project has already made a $2 Billion profit, they have still 1,031 orders in backlog.

 

In my opinion Air New Zealand has hit it out of the park using this aircraft to replace its ageing 767 Fleet - The Aircraft also looks so good.

 

This aircraft still gives me goosebumps and it is certainly one I wish to fly at some point in my career.

 

Attached is a video released by Boeing, it shows the new aircraft preparing for the Farnborough airshow.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZRKm6PG918

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Citation X+ certified | Australian Aviation

Citation X+ certified | Australian Aviation | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
The world's fastest civil aircraft. Cessna has received US FAA certification for the Citation X+, allowing the first customer delivery of what it promotes
Matt Day's insight:

I'm sure flying in a corporate aviation environment would be very challenging with potentially fatiguing work hours covering day and night also working at short notice away from home but flying to some fantastic destinations for the rich and famous would make the job very alluring to some pilots.

 

The aircraft being produced for this niche market are awesome and I would be very happy If I could fly some of these jets.

 

I'm sure this jet is expensive, when the little brother will set you back $30 million Australian but being able to fly at 972km/h (nearly the speed of sound) and a service ceiling of 51,000ft, this jet can get you from Brisbane to Sydney in around 45 minutes.

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Planes in 'near miss' at Vietnam airport

Planes in 'near miss' at Vietnam airport | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Hanoi (AFP) - Two planes nearly collided at an airport in central Vietnam after a young intern was left in charge of directing a busy runway, aviation authorities said.
Matt Day's insight:

350m is certainly not much separation between commercial jet airliners, especially when one aircraft is either shortly about to apply take off power or has already done so.

 

Some runways/aprons can be obstructed from view by air traffic control towers even in good weather conditions, the news article does not mention the prevailing weather and visibility at time and if it was poor, either aircraft or the controller had little chance on seeing each other.

 

It was good Situational Awareness from the Vietnam Airlines crew to pick up that the Jetstar aircraft should not be issued a clearance to take off as the runway was still occupied by them and prevent the accident from occuring.

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GBAS launched at Sydney Airport | Australian Aviation

GBAS launched at Sydney Airport | Australian Aviation | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
A GBAS reference receiver at Sydney Airport. (Airservices) Sydney Airport's Ground Based Augmentation System – GBAS – has been commissioned into ser
Matt Day's insight:

I am a firm believer in new certified technology available to pilots in order to enhance their technical and non technical skills, whilst also making the skies a safer place.

 

The Ground Based Augmentation System is intelligent, modern, cheaper; and once it is adapted throughout Australia I believe it has the potential to be much safer compared to traditional approach systems notably the ILS (Instrument Landing System).

 

Having heard aircraft fly the approach in Sydney (Whilst under testing it was only in good flying conditions), it seemed that pilot and air traffic control workload was reduced with fewer radio calls required thus in turn also improving frequency congestion.

 

It is in my opinion that Australian Air Navigation Facilities and Ground Based Navigation aids are antiquated and no longer sufficient to cope with increasing air traffic. Many Regional Airports are served by an NDB (1940's Technology which is susceptible to many errors) or not served by a navigation facility at all. In the case of Sydney Airport, the ILS systems in place can at times not cope with the heavy traffic  present during periods of inclement weather.

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World's first remote air traffic control tower to open in Sweden

World's first remote air traffic control tower to open in Sweden | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Air traffic controllers armed with a suite of high-tech equipment have been authorized to direct flights over 100 km (61 mi) away from a Swedish airport. Th...
Matt Day's insight:

This is cool, I am a big fan of the concept rolling this out for smaller airfields with low daily movements. It would open up many airfields to air traffic services that were otherwise un-controlled thus making some aerodromes much safer places.

 

The technology is already in place at Alice Springs under trial with the remote air traffic control tower in Adelaide.

 

I was thinking about how they could adapt this technology to high movement aerodromes such as Sydney or Melbourne.

 

It would be way cooler if each of the air traffic control tower windows lets say at Sydney were like a heads up display (Similar to a military fighter jet) with 360 degree vision. That way the controller would look at an aircraft through the window and see its flight strip information attached to it digitally along with distance to the aerodrome, ground speed, etc. 

 

This would reduce the controllers head down time looking at a computer and cross referencing the date on it to the aircraft in the window thus making the operation much safer.

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Investigation: AO-2014-072 - Flight instrument issue involving a Piper PA-27, VH-DTL, near Flinders Island Airport, Tasmania, 18 April 2014

Investigation: AO-2014-072 - Flight instrument issue involving a Piper PA-27, VH-DTL, near Flinders Island Airport, Tasmania, 18 April 2014 | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Aviation, Rail and Marine accident and incident investigations. ATSB investigations seek to identify safety issues and encourage safety action to reduce the risk of future accidents and incidents.
Matt Day's insight:

Many people may recall the Channel 7 television show "Sunday Night" and the two week special it ran on VH-MDX a Cessna which disappeared from western Sydney Radar in 1981, the wreckage or the occupants have never been found.

 

The official report to the incident makes reference to a potential instrument fault that aircraft had previously that day with the aircraft Gyro driven instrument's (Artificial Horizon and Directional Gyro) these are Vital Primary Flight instruments if navigating at night or in IMC (In Cloud). Without these it would make flying much more difficult under certain conditions.

 

it interests me that a similar fault with primary flight instruments in poor weather conditions occurred only months ago. This aircraft had Two Engines and was operating from Moorabbin (Melbourne) to Finders Island. 

 

As the report states the pilot identified a fault with the primary AH soon after takeoff, the secondary AH was operating normally. The pilot elected to continue the flight in Thunderstorm Conditions (Hail, Heavy rain, Moderate and Severe Turbulence) across the bass strait to Finders island, at a time during the arrival both instruments were unreliable and the pilot relied on air traffic control for vectoring and diversion to an alternate aerodrome where the pilot and passengers landed safely

 

Given the initial instrument failure on departure from Moorabbin, it is open to interpretation and opinion if returning to Moorabbin or continuing was the safest option.

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Cold Climate Aviation (Antartic Airlink) - skytraders.com.au

Cold Climate Aviation (Antartic Airlink) - skytraders.com.au | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it

Skytraders is the world’s only civilian carrier to operate a twin-engined commercial airliner for the provision of regular services into Antarctica.

The Skytraders Airbus departs from Hobart, Tasmania, and flies directly to Wilkins ice runway in a little over four hours.

When flying to Antarctica, safety is paramount. The A319 aircraft provides a fast, safe and reliable service between Australia and New Zealand to Antarctica. Skytraders flights adhere to strict procedures that ensure the safety of passengers, crew and aircraft.

Matt Day's insight:

I am always trying to think outside the box and exploring options to make the most of my aviation career.

 

I have seen the SkyTraders Airbus A319CJ  and it is a very sleek clean looking aircraft.

 

I'm sure SkyTraders had to jump through many regulatory hurdles to operate in an Antarctic environment on behalf of the government using these high performance aircraft.

 

I certainly could not live in Antartica however I would love to do a season or two flying with Skytraders, I'm sure the flying would be fantastic, scenery would be amazing, everlasting memories and the experience gained would be very rare and valuable.

 

Id imagine if you wanted to do some challenging flying, this would be one way to push the envelope.

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Colour blind pilots can fly on in Australia: CASA

Colour blind pilots can fly on in Australia: CASA | "Push Back to Park Brake" (OHS and it's impact on Aircraft Operations) | Scoop.it
Australia's flight regulator rejects suggestions it is planning to ground pilots with colour vision deficiency.
Matt Day's insight:

Not many developed countries allow colour blind pilots to fly in a commercial operation, Australia is one of them and allows colour blind pilots hold a Commercial Pilot Licence which allows them currently to fly as Pilot in Command under certain circumstances and as a copilot on High Capacity Jet Aircraft. This ruling has been in place for approximately 26 years.

 

To the best of my knowledge I have not heard of an accident or incident that has been attributed to the pilot having a colour vision deficiency in Australia in this time.

 

In June, CASA sent out a notice to all Pilots with a colour vision deficiency stating that their medical will be reviewed due to a new study which has been completed in regards to colour blindness and its impact flight safety.

 

CASA has since stated that changes will be years away if any were even to be made.

 

I believe that pilots with a colour vision deficiency should be allowed to fly, as long as it does not impact on flight safety in any way.

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