OH&S in Emergency Q2
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Quest 3: Safety devices and Infection control.

Quest 3: Safety devices and Infection control. | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it

Safety devices to reduce needle stick injuries

Glen Evans's insight:

The use of the safety needle and cannula which allow the sharp to be contained post use has been a great innovation to the health care industry.  For Geoff to decrease his chances of needle stick injury he must use these devices as much as possible and promote the use of them to other staff members.  It is not always possible to use such devices and if this is the case Geoff must be aware of his surrounding and have a sharps container on hand to safely dispose of the sharp.            

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Quest 3: Re-educating the educated

Quest 3: Re-educating the educated | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
Nurses set out to decrease healthcare-associated infection rates by increasing compliancy with handwashing initiatives.
Glen Evans's insight:

Due to the amount of times Geoff may wash his hands during a day, and the fact that he works in a sometimes stressful and extremely busy workplace, he must remain vigilant in the need to wash his hands when entering and exiting and when needed during consultation with each and every Patient.  This single act can have a dramatic impact on the transmission of infections throughout an Emergency Department.   

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Quest 3: Mandatory training for infection control.

Quest 3: Mandatory training for infection control. | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it

Queensland Health Guidelines for infection control.

Glen Evans's insight:

On a daily basis Geoff has the potential to come in contact with biological hazards.  The fact that Geoff is in a work environment that exposes him to these hazards, controls must be put into place to reduce the risk.  Education plays a major role in infection control, and through mandatory training it keeps infection control fresh in the minds of the Health Professional.

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OH&S and the Commercial Paramedic in a Mining Emergency Clinic

OH&S and the Commercial Paramedic in a Mining Emergency Clinic | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it

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Glen Evans's insight:

Brian has been a Paramedic for more than 20 years and has recently moved into the Mining industry as Commercial Paramedic and is one of four Paramedics that run an Emergency clinic on site.  Brian is well aware of the potential hazards that a Paramedic faces on a daily basis, ranging from violence to fatigue but since starting in the mining industry he feels that his biggest safety concern is that of driving and interacting with heavy machinery on site.  He did comment that there are other safety concerns but this is a new environment for him and this at present was his biggest concern. 

In the Mining industry there are interactions with light vehicles and heavy machinery and through positive communication, signage, safety bunds, visible safety flags on light vehicles and always giving way to the heavy machinery, can all reduce accidents between light vehicles and heavy machinery. All mines have a standard operating procedure for the operation of light vehicles on site and Brian will be orientated to this and where there is an Emergency situation where he is needed all traffic stops until the emergency is downgraded, which will alleviate many of his concerns. 

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OH&S for the Nurse Practitioner in the Emergency Department

OH&S for the Nurse Practitioner in the Emergency Department | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
Glen Evans's insight:

Geoff has been a Nurse Practitioner in an Emergency Department for over ten years and he feels that the main hazard that he faces on a daily bases is that of biological hazards.  Through exposure to bodily fluids which may come into contact with his skin, eyes or mouth and through sharps injuries. On a daily bases Geoff is exposed to all types of bodily fluids whilst suturing, wound cleaning and whilst assessing a patient.  There is also the risk of needle stick injuries and sharps injuries in general with contaminated sharps.

The Health professional such as in Geoff's case is always at risk of unintentional exposure to biological hazards at work. Preventative actions such as occupational immunisation, standard precaution with the appropriate use of PPE, awareness of infection control through mandatory training, use of sharp devices with built in safety features and having sharps containers close buy for easy disposal, will lessen the chance that Geoff will be exposed to this type of hazard.   

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Quest 3: Nursing students lack effective role models for infection prevention

Quest 3: Nursing students lack effective role models for infection prevention | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it

Students learning bad habits from senior Nurses. 

Glen Evans's insight:

Adherence to the infection control standards should always take place, but due to busy workloads not all precautions are carried out as they should. It is important when Geoff is teaching new practitioners that he makes sure that he adheres to the infection control standards due to the fact that as part of their learning, is observing the practices of their more senior Professionals.

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Quest 3: Nurses should play a more proactive role with the flu season

Quest 3: Nurses should play a more proactive role with the flu season | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
2013 Jan Infection Control Nurses Help Fight Transmission in Severe Flu Season
Glen Evans's insight:

An important aspect in infection control is an active immunisation program within a health facility.  There are certain immunisations that are mandatory such as hepatitis B, but staff like Geoff should be more available for immunisation such as the influenza vaccine which can reduce transmission rates in a facility.

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OH&S and the Support Services Officer in the Emergency Department

OH&S and the Support Services Officer in the Emergency Department | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
Glen Evans's insight:

Grahame has been a Support Services Officer formerly known as a wardsman for the Emergency Department for over ten years.  In his role Grahame has to deal with health and safety issues ranging from biological spills to hazardous cleaning chemicals to what he feels is the biggest threat to his health and safety on a daily basis, manual handling.  Graham feels that there are many reasons why there are less injuries today which could be attributed to the many great innovations brought into the Department for assisting with manual handling, but due to staffing issues and sometimes lack of available equipment it remains a big issue in his line of work.  These issues raised by Grahame are not issues that can be readily rectified due to the always tight hospital budgets.    

However, Grahame is aware that through correct manual handling, appropriate number of staff assistance and using devices to help, when be it objects or people need lifting, moving or repositioning, will limit the stresses on his body.  There also needs to be positive communication with supervisors in regards to hazards, injuries and if there may be a safer way of carrying out a task.  

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OH&S and Clerical Staff in the Emergency Department

OH&S and Clerical Staff in the Emergency Department | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
Glen Evans's insight:

Sue has been part of the Clerical staff in the Emergency Department for a number of years and during which time the biggest OH&S issue that she has had to deal with, is due to the long periods of time sitting behind a computer.  Due to her job, Sue is exposed to a situation which can lead to an incorrect posture while seated for long periods of time and can involve repetitive movements, especially with the hands and wrists.  Sue has found over the years that due to the her work she does suffer from headaches, stiffness in her neck and back, but has learned ways of elleviating the stresses on her body, such as stretching exercises and regular breaks to walk around for a minute or so.  

If an employee is exposed to a situation such as Sue’s where there needs to be long periods of work done in front of the computer, appropriate seating is warranted that will support the workers posture, along with education on good posturing, regular breaks and inform the supervisor of any back or neck pain and any changes in sensation in the hands.   

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OH&S for Emergency Department Physiotherapists

OH&S for Emergency Department Physiotherapists | OH&S in Emergency Q2 | Scoop.it
Glen Evans's insight:

Working in an Emergency Department as a Physiotherapist, can be a physically and mentally challenging job.  Campbell  has done this for a number of years and has found the main occupational hazards that he has encountered are manual handling and Biological hazards. 

Manual handling for Physiotherapists is a work hazard, as there is continual lifting and manipulating of Patients bodies as well as support while mobilising patients for assessment or therapies.  Through assistance from other parties, the use of walking equipment and correct posturing while working, can all help to reduce any undue stress placed on the Health professional. 

Biological Hazards are a potential hazard to the Physiotherapist as they are coming into direct contact with Patients continually throughout the day.  Through occupational immunisation, training in infection control, wearing of appropriate PPE whilst assessing Patients and disposing correctly of contaminated waste, can all decrease possible exposure to Biological Hazards. 

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