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Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | Offices | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.

 

A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™

 

Excerpted:

 

 

The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.

 

Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:

 

#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.

 

#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.

 

Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 

 

#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.

 

You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.


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To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case: IRIS International

To Supercharge Growth, Start By Tearing Down Silos, Case:  IRIS International | Offices | Scoop.it

"How IRIS International treated its toxic company culture to achieve dramatic growth."

Learn How IRIS International became a company that is setting the bar in innovation, collaboration, and growth.

Excerpts:

When César García came to IRIS International 10 years ago, the company was on the ropes. The manufacturer of medical diagnostic products had a stale product line, flat revenues, and mounting debt.

_______________

 

Annual revenue [lept] from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year.

_______________

   

 

García welcomed the challenge of a turnaround and in 2003, he became president and CEO of IRIS (International Remote Imaging Systems). He brought in a new management team. Secured debt refinancing. Pushed hard for new product development.

But García quickly concluded that the real problem was IRIS’s toxic company culture. It was a culture that kept its employees locked in silos and prevented the organization from seizing external opportunities.

The transformation at IRIS under García’s leadership has been extraordinary. The company has launched 15 new products in the last 10 years. Annual revenue has leaped from $28 million in 2002 to $118 million last year, with $129 million projected for 2012. 


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Change Leading: Why Gen Y Could Believe In Your Cause And Your Company

Change Leading:  Why Gen Y Could Believe In Your Cause And Your Company | Offices | Scoop.it

"Gen Y notoriously rallies for movements and startups they love.  How can you  reach out Gen Y to lead change in your company?"

This post does a remarkable job of turning conventions around, like parents teaching their children.  Who hasn't learned from their own kids about how to use social media better, as one example?  How can we listen into generations to help change happen & stick?

 

_________________

   

 

To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter. - Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

_________________

 

   

Excerpts:

 

Here's how to recruit Gen Y to your side:


1. Define your space: Build for a specific demographic and build remarkably for them.  Be proud of what you do, and it'll show.


2. Be completely authentic: Our generation knows how to find a fraudulent needle in a digital haystack, so stay true to your space and the audience you intend to serve.


3. Ask for action: Ask! If your campaign, movement, or organization doesn't have a call to action, how can you expect a response? Impressions are wasted without a call to action. Even if it's a simple "Read More" or "Go Here," you need to have a goal with every interaction.


To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter.

 

We're the arrogant "kids" who will change the world for the better, who will start fixing the world instead of just breaking it, who will streamline banalities, and who will exploit joy.

 

 

Source:  Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

 

Yael founded Fuck Cancer in 2009 after her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Determined to make a real impact within the cancer space, she created an organization that activates Generation Y to engage with their parents about early detection, and teaches supporters how to look for cancer instead of just find it.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 22, 2012 1:48 AM
Our generation has moved forward because of technology. But it is true that many aged individuals could hardly accept the fact and they are extremely confused on how the younger people act the way they do. It is actually a matter of acceptance and respect so as to avoid clash with the younger generation. We also have to accept that this is their time, and they should be allowed to enjoy their era.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 23, 2012 10:32 AM
@Victoria, so true. Thanks for the comments. Fast Company (also Scooped on one of my curations streams, covers "Generation Flux," which is ageless. In general, though, I agree with "We also have to accept that this is their time, and they should be allowed to enjoy their era." ~ Deb
Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:52 PM

This post does a remarkable job of turning conventions around, like parents teaching their children.  Who hasn't learned from their own kids about how to use social media better, as one example?  How can we listen into generations to help change happen & stick?

 

_________________

 

"To those who say we are the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter." - Yael Cohen, The 100 Most Creative People In Business

_________________

 

   

Excerpts:

 

Here's how to recruit Gen Y to your side:


1. Define your space: Build for a specific demographic and build remarkably for them.  Be proud of what you do, and it'll show.


2. Be completely authentic: Our generation knows how to find a fraudulent needle in a digital haystack, so stay true to your space and the audience you intend to serve.


3. Ask for action: Ask! If your campaign, movement, or organization doesn't have a call to action, how can you expect a response? Impressions are wasted without a call to action. Even if it's a simple "Read More" or "Go Here," you need to have a goal with every interaction.


To those who say we're the lazy generation, the entitled generation, the arrogant generation, you're right. We're “lazy” because we work smarter.

 

We're the arrogant "kids" who will change the world for the better, who will start fixing the world instead of just breaking it, who will streamline banalities, and who will exploit joy.

 

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There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership?

There is no such thing as leadership – Peter Drucker classic, Change Leadership? | Offices | Scoop.it

Wes Balda has written a compelling piece on Peter Drucker and our overwrought attention to defining leadership, which is timely, seeing the new Pew report on negative media and presidental election coverage.

 

Excerpts:


At lunch one day, [Wes] asked Peter to define leadership. He snorted in response, “There is no such thing as leadership.”

 

WB: He defended this by claiming it couldn’t be defined. He stressed that leaders were only labeled thus because they had followers.

 

PD: “At best, leadership may be a dimension of management,” he said, “and leaders could be identified because their actions were predictable, or perhaps trustworthy.”

_________________________


Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.
_________________________

 

 

WB: ...Max DePree identified an important concept – the absence of power. Leading could be how we manage, or make knowledge effective through relationships, in powerless environments.


Results are achieved around or beyond the use of power. “Leading without power” may be the only way leadership works. By definition, then, using power in leading is not leading at all.

 

DN:  Perhaps it's just coercion, or intimidation.  From another article excerpted here, from Forbes, note the diagrammed split of leadership and management tools and the placement of "power tools."


WB:  So, when Drucker says leaders are only defined by the presence of followers, I believe he means that these followers first exist – and that they are absolutely free from all constraints in choosing to follow.


A well known video on being the first follower helps illustrate this point.

 

Power is absent, and the decision to follow creates the ultimate democracy. (Drucker, incidentally, was even more focused on civil society after Sept. 11, 2001.)


Read the full article here.

 

Photo credit:  by Jeff McNeill, Flickr.com CC

 

More about resources for leaders via Deb is here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats
Presentation Videos - Change Results
Deb's mothership: The REVELN website


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 6, 2012 9:28 AM
In any organization, there will always be leaders and followers. It is true that many people hate the fact that they are just simple followers, the main reason why they often time make nasty comments about these leaders.But, despite all these negative comments, a true leader should never be onion-skinned, and should stand firm on what he believes is right and advantageous for the majority, regardless of any negative opinions.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 10, 2012 9:54 AM
@Victoria, thanks for your comment. It is true that "leaders" must have thick skins. Drucker's point, I believe, is that followers define the leaders, and that leaders may, in many, even most cases be an artifact of management, rather than the magical status we've given them over the years.

Indeed, where would Gandi, Nelson Mandela, Washington and Lincoln be without their first followers and the followings that emerged to turn the tides of public opinion to make significant changes in our histories.

It's a provocative article and I'm glad that people are rescooping it. ~ Deb
Erika Holthuizen's comment, September 25, 2012 9:58 PM
golden truth
!
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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Offices | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."

 

It's the how, the what, not so much!

 

HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see buzz about updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.

 

Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:

 

"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."

 

____________________________

 

HOW we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________

 

MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 

 

What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.

 

Our data show that great teams:


• Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


• Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


• Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


• Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 

 

...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.

 

Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.

 

 


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IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual

IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual | Offices | Scoop.it

"To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks."

 

Photo caption:  Preparing for the Google+ Hangout with the UN Secretary-General.

 

Where One Door Closes:  I'm doing a Google+ hangout today to discuss setting up a blogging circle with friends nearby and in another time zone.  I maintain several relationships using Skype, Google+ hangout, Facebook and Pinterest.  

 

The doors are opening to new methods not as bound by silos and other traditional organizational boundaries.  In business, conversational tools and collaborative tools, like PowerNoodle, a collaboration idea sharing tool, are becoming mainstream.

 

_____________________

 

There’s irony in an IBM report of how CEO’s are seeing their businesses changing, based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries...
_____________________

 

It's little wonder that CEO's are seeing the value of screen-time, even thought this well researched IBM study was conducted face-to-face.  The article from Formtek Blog has a title that is not as neutral:  ...Eroding the need for Face-to-Face in Business.   Yet it is hopeful.

 

Some excerpts:

 

There’s irony in the IBM report as the first page — contains only the words: “This study is based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries.”

 

_____________________

 

Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

_____________________

 

Several major findings:

 

CEO’s are seeing less value in face-to-face encounters and are increasingly pursuing social media and collaboration technologies for interacting with others. . Over 50% [of the CEO's interviewed] expect social channels to be a primary way of engaging customers within five years.”

.

20% of CEO’s said that social media already is one of their most important forms of interaction with others

.

57% thought that within another 3-5 years social media would become important.

.

Currently 80% see face-to-face interactions as very important today, that’s expected to slip to just 67 percent who will feel that way in 3-5 years.

 

 

 

CEO’s are seeing collaboration increasingly as a tool that can be used to bring about team building and cooperation, allowing executives within the organization to work cross-functionally.

 

Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

 

_____________________

 

CEOs will need to learn from their own networks. They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios.

_____________________

 

Bridget van Kralingen, vice president of IBM Global Business Services, commented, ”Rather than ...de-personalising human relationships, this view leans heavily in favour of deepening them, and using dynamic social networks to harness collective intelligence to unlock new models of collaboration.”

 

Pierre Morin a partner at IBM Global Business Services, said that “...they want people across the organization to feel comfortable reaching out to the CEO to share ideas or engage a discussion. Social media is a mechanism to do that.”

 

The IBM report concludes that

 

“To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks.

 

They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios—with generational, geographic, institutional diversity. Then, they’ll need to help their organizations do the same.”

 

Read the full post here.

Photo credit:  Flickr, cc, by specialoperations


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UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job

UnConventional ~ Josh James, CEO, Hiring the Underqualified & Angry, Learning on the Job | Offices | Scoop.it

Josh James, Founder and CEO of Domo; Author of Startup Rules responds to ~ The Case for Hiring “Under Qualified" by digging deeper into his hiring philosophy & success.  He's also the all-star executive who also co-founded Omniture and took it from inception to IPO to sale for $1.8B to Adobe

 

Assessments don't catch what Josh James is talking about, the renegades, the untested, as well as the angry ones who have something to prove.  In that light, Josh James proves how one of his rules shows the limits of the others. - Deb

______________________________

  

#45:  No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, currently employed candidates who won’t leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________


Excerpts:

Josh James's response to "Dave, Dave, Dave..." in Forbes focusing on his Rule 45: "No Unemployed Candidates. Always an Excuse. Too Risky. Top-Rated, Currently Employed Candidates Who Won’t Leave… PERFECT.”

______________________________

 

...a handful of my executives ...had been fired from their previous job. They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong...that I couldn’t resist.

______________________________

 

I’ve always believed that hiring people with untapped potential can serve as a tremendous accelerant to your business. This is something I learned very early on in my career and has been a staple of my hiring and promoting decisions throughout the course of running my businesses. 

______________________________

  

...hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated...

______________________________

 

[However], if you were faced with hiring 10 employees who were terminated for one reason or another, or hiring 10 employees who were top-rated, currently employed individuals who didn’t want to initially even interview, then I think the latter group would prove to contain dramatically more successful individuals 90% of the time.

That said, a handful of my executives at Omniture who had been fired from their previous job.  

They were so angry and motivated to prove the world wrong (another one of my rules: hire orphans, picked-on people, or people who have been fired for that exact reason—they are motivated), that I couldn’t resist.  


...We have an obligation to the rest of our employees and their families to ensure we have a world-class, globally competitive company.  In order to do that, I want to stack the cards in our favor as much as possible.  Capitalism isn’t always nice.

If you look at my other rules, (DN:  In his list of 55 Start-Up Rules) you’ll notice number 46:

  

There are exceptions to every rule and to the extent you make the exceptions, you accept greater risk, but you can also receive greater reward.  

   
In that vein, my startup rule number 20 (also found at http://www.joshjames.com) speaks to that, about hiring the underprivileged and undeserved, who, although they haven’t had the best chances yet, they have the gumption, desire, and enthusiasm and are just waiting for the right person to believe in them.

Half of my management team at Omniture and already half of the leaders who have received promotions at Domo are people who were or are learning on the job.  

We are chock full of people whom I have my eye on and who are killing it in their positions. 

They will deserve and receive promotions down the road despite their lack of a been-there-done-that resume. They have the intangibles.  (DN: That don't show up on assessments, necessarily.)

And by the way, we’re hiring.  - Josh James


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