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Rescooped by Cora Bijsterveld from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?)

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?) | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it
If you haven’t tried a free MOOC, I’d do it sooner than later. In recent weeks, the whole MOOC project took a hit when a University of Pennsylvania study found what was becoming empirically obvious — that MOOCs generally have very low participation and completion rates, and what’s more, most of the students taking the courses are “disproportionately educated, male, [and] wealthy,” and from the United States. This study, combined with other disappointing experiments and findings, will likely make universities think twice about sinking money into creating MOOCs (they can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 to develop). It might take another 6-12 months to see the shift. But I’d hazard a guess that this January might be the peak of the free MOOC trend. Enjoy them while they last. Whatever their shortcomings, they can be quite informative, and you can’t beat the price.

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:49 AM

Very little of this do I find this surprising.

MFaculty's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:44 PM

The insights revealed through the previous studies serves to codify what many educators, and even more marketers knew intuitively; free always begs the question of quality. Don't hear what I'm not saying. I'm not saying ALL MOOCs are low quality, I'm merely saying that without academic rigor and effective management, even the best intentions can slide off the rails.

 

I too had noted a number of previous MOOC supporters distancing themselves from the initiatives. Was there ever an identified demand for MOOCs, or were they simply a result of benevolent thinking? Regardless, it is interesting that the 'target audience' for MOOCs are apparently the ones taking least advantage of them. Perhaps the age old marketing rendition of supply and demand has merit still has merit.

Tammy Morley's curator insight, January 8, 2014 7:43 PM

Food for thought.

Rescooped by Cora Bijsterveld from Learning With Social Media Tools & Mobile
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Online universities: it's time for teachers to join the revolution

Online universities: it's time for teachers to join the revolution | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

One way Moocs have changed education is by increasing access. Moocs make education borderless, gender-blind, race-blind, class-blind and bank account-blind. Up to now, quality education – and in some cases, any higher education at all – has been the privilege of the few. Moocs have changed that. Anyone with an internet connection can have access. We hear from thousands of students, many in under-served, developing countries, about how grateful they are for this education.


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Rescooped by Cora Bijsterveld from Opening up education
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MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education | Li Yuan & Stephen Powell - JISC CETIS publications

MOOCs and Open Education: Implications for Higher Education | Li Yuan & Stephen Powell - JISC CETIS publications | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

This report sets out to help decision makers in higher education institutions gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) and trends towards greater openness in higher education and to think about the implications for their institutions. The phenomena of MOOCs are described, placing them in the wider context of open education, online learning and the changes that are currently taking place in higher education at a time of globalisation of education and constrained budgets. The report is written from a UK higher education perspective, but is largely informed by the developments in MOOCs from the USA and Canada. A literature review was undertaken focussing on the extensive reporting of MOOCs through blogs, press releases as well as openly available reports. This identified current debates about new course provision, the impact of changes in funding and the implications for greater openness in higher education. The theory of disruptive innovation is used to help form the questions of policy and strategy that higher education institutions need to address.


Via Peter B. Sloep, Robert Schuwer
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Peter B. Sloep's comment, March 25, 2013 9:57 AM
You are right, pity that cMOOCs have not been included as their inclusion would have significantly widened the range of possible outcome scenarios. Still, in defence of the authors, I don't think they set out to cover cMOOCs as well as these are not seen as threatening to HE as it is now.
suifaijohnmak's comment, March 25, 2013 10:08 AM
Yes, I agreed fully with your view :)
verstelle's curator insight, March 26, 2013 3:58 PM

Thorough report from the Brittish JISC/CETIS. 

Many of the reported is not new for those who follow MOOC developments but it is worth reading e.g. for these conclusions:

 

"...there is a significant question for higher education institutions to address: are online teaching innovations, such as MOOCs, heralding a change in the business landscape that poses a threat to their existing models of provision of degree courses? [...] If this is the case, then the theory of disruptive 

innovation suggests that there is a strong argument for establishing an autonomous business unit in order to make an appropriate response to these potentially disruptive innovations"

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The MOOC Honeymoon is Over: Three Takeaways from the Coursera Calamity

The MOOC Honeymoon is Over: Three Takeaways from the Coursera Calamity | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

The honeymoon with MOOCs is over. The reality check has finally arrived which was inevitable. 

 

The Three Takeaways
Below I’ve outlined the key takeaways from the FOE experience. Many ideas presented here are based upon the concepts and principles of Stephen Downes, George Siemens and Dave Cormier, founders of the original MOOC concept


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Rescooped by Cora Bijsterveld from Open Educational Resources (OER)
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Geoff Cain - MOOCs: Why Do We Need Instructional Design?

Geoff Cain - MOOCs: Why Do We Need Instructional Design? | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

Just as we need a new learning theory to account for new modalities in learning, we also need a new framework for instructional design, a rubric for MOOC development. New modalities of learning, content delivery, and engagement in online, hybrid courses and Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have required new learning theory: Connectivism. Given this new theory, this paper suggests that a new instructional design model is needed as well.


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Cynthia Cunningham's curator insight, October 30, 2013 11:21 PM

Good presentation of proposed work and connectivism.

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Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org

Connectivism in Practice — How to Organize a MOOC | Peeragogy.org | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:16 PM

Anyone considering creating a mooc will benefit from a little advice.

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Coursera, edX, and MOOCs Are Changing the Online Education Business | MIT Technology Review

Coursera, edX, and MOOCs Are Changing the Online Education Business | MIT Technology Review | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

Students anywhere are being offered free instruction online. What will that do to the trillion-dollar education business?
"If you were asked to name the most important innovation in transportation over the last 200 years, you might say the combustion engine, air travel, Henry Ford’s Model-T production line, or even the bicycle. The list goes on.

Now answer this one: what’s been the single biggest innovation in education?

Don’t worry if you come up blank. You’re supposed to. The question is a gambit used by Anant Agarwal, the computer scientist named this year to head edX, a $60 million MIT-Harvard effort to stream a college education over the Web, free, to anyone who wants one. His point: it’s rare to see major technological advances in how people learn."

 

 


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Rescooped by Cora Bijsterveld from 21st Century Information Fluency
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Information Literacy Mooc from Wake Forest


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, December 15, 2013 2:21 PM

About this course

Welcome! ZSRx is a free, open, online course ,,,The course is designed to be a fun, collaborative environment for exploring tools and techniques for using the web to increase your productivity, your search effectiveness, your evaluation skills, and your awareness of issues related to privacy on the web

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MOOCs are losing their original worthy goals | Inside Higher Ed

MOOCs are losing their original worthy goals | Inside Higher Ed | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

Original MOOCs (oMOOCs) were free, or at least extremely affordable, fully online, well-crafted and contained a lot of interesting pedagogy and instructional design. The target demographic was the underserved, both nationally and internationally. Per Downes, they were "not designed to serve the missions of the elite colleges and universities...." but rather "designed to undermine them, and make those missions obsolete."

Hijacked MOOCs are flagship (institution)-led, starting to cost (increasingly), often hybrid, faculty headshot to camera, tech sophistication layered on, little-to-zero impact on faculty member revisiting / learning? pedagogy (in any format) and not very massive. They're mostly taken by education technologists, already-qualified individuals and Tom Friedman.


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Being social in a MOOC

Being social in a MOOC | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it
Social media and digital learning environments are now combined. As part of the MOOC experience, students are requested to join debates and course’s topics on social networks, such as Facebook, Twi...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kumuda Gururao, Kent Wallén
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How online class about online learning failed miserably

How online class about online learning failed miserably | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it

"We want all students to have the highest quality learning experience. For this reason, we are temporarily suspending the “Fundamentals of Online Education: Planning and Application” course in order to make improvements. We apologize for any inconvenience that this may cause. We will inform you when the course will be reoffered."


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 5, 2013 10:59 AM

What can be learned from public failure? Moocs are pushing the boundaries of e-learning. Attempting to teach 41,000 people how to design their own online class in 8 weeks is hubris at best, ignorance at the worst.


Apparently the design of this course (which has become a punching bag on the blogosphere) wasn't ready for prime time.  


From my experience with small, normal sized courses, I'd never attempt to create groups in the first week of a class. Folks need the first week to get oriented. Give them a chance to look around. 


Start with tasks that can be easily accomplished.  Automate the response/assessment to some video on general principals.Use the old Mike Myers' line "Talk amongst yourselves!" and let students free lance their own discussion groups. (Suggest a twitter hashtag?)  Bottom line don't over-reach.


Kudos for pulling the plug


Still,  It's easy to diagonse this failure in retrospect. No one is entitled to outrage here. It was a free class.  How many private face to face failures happen in regular classrooms each semester? Ask any student who drops a course after the first lecture. How many universities have cancelled a failed class after the first week and offered a refund of tuition?  A free class that fails, is just that. 


So lessons learned?


  • You can't design a Mooc as if it were a standard facilitated class.
  • Keep your objectives realistic (an intro to online learning class won't enable you to design an online course).
  • Be sure your tech can handle the crowds.
  • You have to walk the talk, the folks behind this class slipped up. (They are human, give 'em a break.)
  • If indeed they redesign and comeback with a new course, be sure it's been crowd tested in advance!




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Experiences from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and how the MOOC could potentially increase diversity, social inclusion & learner engagement | Mark Morley

"There is currently much interest and excitement at the emergence of an educational approach commonly termed the ‘Massive Open Online Course’ or MOOC. ... I feel there is much we can learn from the delivery of MOOCs that can be used to enhance the on-campus experience supplemented by online course material and delivery. This format offers us the opportunity to investigate learning and improve teaching processes, perhaps more similar to the edX approach. It would seem appropriate to collect and use data to inform this process; treating learning and teaching as a field ripe for research, tying in to a research-led approach."


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Rose Heaney's curator insight, January 12, 2013 6:30 AM

comprehensive indeed - author has participated in a lot of moocs. Very readable intro for those who have never heard of moocs

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, January 13, 2013 9:17 AM

Interesting and detailed personal insight into cMOOCs and xMOOCs from a participant. I sincerely hope more learners take the time to reflect and share the experiences they have with this kind of learning context. I find as an educator that the student voice is important and assuming that the developers of MOOCs are prepared to listen to critique, both postive and negative, then this is a valuable factor which can lead to improvements which hopefully will have a positive effect on the learner experience and quality of learning.

 

 

 

Hamline CTL's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:22 PM

MOOCs are not going away!

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40 Useful Tips For Anyone Taking A MOOC

40 Useful Tips For Anyone Taking A MOOC | OER and e-learning | Scoop.it
Whether you’re looking to online education for personal reasons or to get ahead in your career, use these tips to help you get more out of open courses and use what you learn to market yourself, improve your performance, and stand out on the job.

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