Ken's Odds & Ends
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Ken's Odds & Ends
Links that I want to share and remember because they made me think more deeply on a topic. Warning: I do engage in some 'linkdumping' here. This is not a true curation page.
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Bryan Alexander on the Future of MOOCs | EDUCAUSE.edu

Bryan Alexander on the Future of MOOCs | EDUCAUSE.edu | Ken's Odds & Ends | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

I have taken some online classes (not MOOCs with Bryan Alexander over the past few years.  I always enjoy hearing his opinion.

Ken

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What You Need to Know About MOOCs

What You Need to Know About MOOCs | Ken's Odds & Ends | Scoop.it
Wondering what all the fuss is about? Here's a guide to our coverage of massive open online courses.
Ken Morrison's insight:

A running archive of articles about MOOCs in the Chronicle of Higher Education

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9 Sources of Free eBooks for MOOC Teachers and Students - moocnewsandreviews.com

9 Sources of Free eBooks for MOOC Teachers and Students - moocnewsandreviews.com | Ken's Odds & Ends | Scoop.it
Instructors need to accommodate their students’ need for high-quality content. Free ebooks will round out a MOOC student’s online learning experience.

Via MOOC News & Reviews, Professor Jill Jameson
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Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs: old narratives v new narrative - open, scalable, diverse & relevant

Donald Clark Plan B: MOOCs: old narratives v new narrative - open, scalable, diverse & relevant | Ken's Odds & Ends | Scoop.it
Ken Morrison's insight:

Here is my favorite paragraph:

If you believe that the purpose of a MOOC is to mimic the standard undergraduate course, you will be disappointed as many of the participants in MOOCs are not young undergraduates. You will also see drop-out, rather than drop-in, a category mistake that sees anything other than passing the final exam as failure (a BIG mistake). There is also a false assumption that face-to-face teaching is a necessary condition for learning. It is not. We learn most of what we learn, not from direct teaching but informally from all sorts of sources and interactions. This is not to say that teaching is unimportant. In practice, on MOOCs, human contact takes all sorts of forms, from teacher to student, student to student, content to student, peer assessment, physical meetups among students, forums, social media. This is a rich blend of human interaction and, in connectivist MOOCs, it is this very feature that, their connectivist founders claim, makes them work so well. There are demands for more rigour in summative assessment, despite the fact that many learners may not want summative assessment at all and others lighter forms of assessment. MOOCs are taken for all sorts of reasons by all sorts of people from all sorts of places. For many it’s not a paper-chase. Squeezing the debate back into the ‘do I get a credit for this course – if not it’s a waste of time’ is wrong-headed.

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