Odd Studies
Follow
Find
2 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from It's Show Prep for Radio
onto Odd Studies
Scoop.it!

Night owls may be smarter than morning people, study says

Night owls may be smarter than morning people, study says | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
Ben Franklin may have been wrong when he sang the praises of being early to bed, early to rise.

Via Stu Gray
more...
Odd Studies
Surveys and scientific studies good for on-air discussion.
Curated by Taylor Hohulin
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from It's Show Prep for Radio
Scoop.it!

Night owls may be smarter than morning people, study says

Night owls may be smarter than morning people, study says | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
Ben Franklin may have been wrong when he sang the praises of being early to bed, early to rise.

Via Stu Gray
more...
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Radio Show Contents
Scoop.it!

Looking at your own Facebook photos boosts your mood

Looking at your own Facebook photos boosts your mood | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
We all know — and science has proven — that looking at Facebook photos can make us miserable. But it turns out that may only be true about other people's photos.

Via R Murali Ramasamy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Radio Show Contents
Scoop.it!

Men lie THREE TIMES more than women, study finds... and the most common fibs? 'Yes, darling I've done it,' and 'I'm sorry, I didn't have a signal'

Men lie THREE TIMES more than women, study finds... and the most common fibs? 'Yes, darling I've done it,' and 'I'm sorry, I didn't have a signal' | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
Men are three times as likely to lie as women, lying on average three times every single day – over 1,000 times each year. The average woman lies just once each day.

Via Griffin Adkins, R Murali Ramasamy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Taylor Hohulin
Scoop.it!

The happiest and saddest states according to Twitter

The happiest and saddest states according to Twitter | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
Hawaii was found to be the United States' happiest state in a recent study of geotagged tweets. The saddest? Louisiana.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Radio Show Contents
Scoop.it!

Men change their hairstyle just THREE times as an adult but women refresh their look up to four times a year

Men change their hairstyle just THREE times as an adult but women refresh their look up to four times a year | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
New research has found that men change their hair once every six years while women go for the chop at least once a year.

Via Griffin Adkins, R Murali Ramasamy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Radio Show Content Ideas
Scoop.it!

A quarter of women lie on Facebook, unsurprising research finds | SMI

A quarter of women lie on Facebook, unsurprising research finds | SMI | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
Nearly one in 10 ladies say they lie more than once a week on social sites in a bid to make their lives seem more interesting

Via Stephanie Winans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Radio Show Contents
Scoop.it!

One in seven women admits binning their man's old clothes without telling him (even though they have 16 items in the wardrobe they never wear)

One in seven women admits binning their man's old clothes without telling him (even though they have 16 items in the wardrobe they never wear) | Odd Studies | Scoop.it
The survey by the British Heart Foundation also found that a third of Britons feel 'relieved' following a clear-out, while 11 per cent of women say it is ‘better than sex'.

Via Griffin Adkins, R Murali Ramasamy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Taylor Hohulin from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Study: Certain Television Fare Can Help Ease Aggression in Young Children, (encourages empathy)

Study:  Certain Television Fare Can Help Ease Aggression in Young Children, (encourages empathy) | Odd Studies | Scoop.it

Experts have long known that children imitate many of the deeds — good and bad — that they see on television. But it has rarely been shown that changing a young child’s viewing habits at home can lead to improved behavior.

 

In a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, researchers reported the results of a program designed to limit the exposure of preschool children to violence-laden videos and television shows and increase their time with educational programming that encourages empathy. They found that the experiment reduced the children’s aggression toward others, compared with a group of children who were allowed to watch whatever they wanted.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.