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Rescooped by Matt Kaplan from Cause and Effects of Global Warming
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Global Warming Impacts and Effects

The effects of Global Warming can already be seen.

The IPCC's Third Assessment Report finds that in the last 40 years, the global average sea level has risen, ocean heat content has increased, and snow cover and ice extent have decreased, which threatens to inundate low-lying island nations and coastal regions throughout the world.


Via Global Warming
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What Philippines Can Learn From 2004 Tsunami - Bloomberg

What Philippines Can Learn From 2004 Tsunami - Bloomberg | Oceanography | Scoop.it
Bloomberg
What Philippines Can Learn From 2004 Tsunami
Bloomberg
The Asian tsunami remains one of the biggest natural disasters in mankind's history, a calamity that claimed more than 200,000 lives in 14 countries.
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7.8 Magnitude Undersea Earthquake Hits South Atlantic, No Tsunami Warnings ... - International Business Times AU

7.8 Magnitude Undersea Earthquake Hits South Atlantic, No Tsunami Warnings ... - International Business Times AU | Oceanography | Scoop.it
Business Recorder
7.8 Magnitude Undersea Earthquake Hits South Atlantic, No Tsunami Warnings ...
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Indonesian Tsunamis

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Rescooped by Matt Kaplan from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Yes, Typhoon Haiyan Was Caused by Climate Change | The Nation

Yes, Typhoon Haiyan Was Caused by Climate Change | The Nation | Oceanography | Scoop.it

It seems these days that whenever Mother Nature wants to send an urgent message to humankind, it sends it via the Philippines. This year the messenger was Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Yolanda.


For the second year in a row, the world’s strongest typhoon barreled through the Philippines, Yolanda following on the footsteps steps of Pablo, a k a Bopha, in 2012. And for the third year in a row, a destructive storm deviated from the usual path taken by typhoons, striking communities that had not learned to live with these fearsome weather events because they were seldom hit by them in the past. Sendong in December 2011 and Bopha last year sliced Mindanao horizontally, while Yolanda drove through the Visayas, also in a horizontal direction.


That it was climate change creating the super typhoons that were taking weird directions was a message from Nature not just to Filipinos but to the whole world, whose attention was transfixed on the televised digital images of a massive, angry cyclone bearing down, then sweeping across the central Philippines on its way to the Asian mainland.


The message that Nature was sending via Yolanda–which packed winds stronger than Superstorm Sandy, which hit New Jersey and New York last October, and Hurricane Katrina, which devastated New Orleans in 2005–was especially meant for the governments of the world that are assembling in Warsaw for the annual global climate change negotiations (COP 19), beginning on November 11.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Sky Sirewest's curator insight, November 11, 2013 11:12 PM

Can man out do his own greed?  or Will his greed take him out?

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Orchestra Networks – Collaborative MDM to avoid “tsunamis” work ...

Orchestra Networks – Collaborative MDM to avoid “tsunamis” work ... | Oceanography | Scoop.it
Following our previous posts (MDMI Coverage, Trends) from the 8th annual MDM/DG Summit in New York, we focus today's post on the United Technologies case study and their comments on distributed workflow and ...
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Kuril Island Tsunamis

Kuril Island Tsunamis

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