Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional
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Farm incomes face drought

Farm incomes face drought | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
With rainfall at record low levels, farmers across Australia are facing some of the toughest drought conditions in years. So why has the government chosen now to change crucial allowances for those in need?

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Australians Told to Expect Worse Weather | Truthdig

Australians Told to Expect Worse Weather | Truthdig | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it

Australians have received a stark warning that climate change is already increasing the intensity and frequency of extreme weather, posing serious and growing risks to people across the continent.

 

The country’s independent Climate Commission, established in 2011 to provide authoritative information on climate science and solutions, spells out the reasons which underlie its warning in a report, The Critical Decade: Extreme Weather.

 

It concludes that the world’s emissions of greenhouse gases will have to fall to almost nothing by 2050 in order to stabilise the climate. At the moment they are continuing to increase, with no sign that global agreement on reducing them is anywhere close.

 

The report singles out south-east Australia, with its many large towns and cities, as a region facing increased risk of extreme weather – heatwaves, droughts, bushfires and coastal flooding.

 

The Commission says regions across the south-east and south-west which are essential to Australian agriculture are likely to face a bigger drought risk.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Late-Holocene Bird Extinction Linked to Human Colonization

Late-Holocene Bird Extinction Linked to Human Colonization | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
A new research suggests that more than 1,000 bird species became extinct on Pacific islands following human colonization.

 

Scientists had long known extinction rates in the region were high but estimates varied from 800 to 2,000 bird species. The researchers led by Prof Tim Blackburn of the University of Tennessee studied the extinction rates of nonperching land birds on Pacific islands from 700 to 3,500 years ago. They used fossil records from 41 Pacific islands such as Hawaii and Fiji to run an analytical technique called the Bayesian mark-recapture method. This allowed them to model gaps in the fossil record for more than 300 Pacific islands and estimate the number of unknown extinct species.

 

“We used information on what species are currently on the islands and what species are in the fossil record to estimate the probability of finding a species in the fossil record,” said co-author Prof Alison Boyer, also from the University of Tennessee.

 

The team found that nearly 983, or two-thirds, of land bird populations disappeared between the years of the first human arrival and European colonization. Disappearances are linked to overhunting by people, forest clearance and introduced species.

 

“We calculate that human colonization of remote Pacific islands caused the global extinction of close to a thousand species of nonperching land birds alone,” Prof Boyer said. “However, it is likely there are more species that were affected by human presence. Sea bird and perching bird extinctions will add to this total.”

 

Species lost include several species of moa-nalos, large flightless waterfowl from Hawai’i, and the New Caledonian Sylviornis, a relative of the game birds but which weighed in at around 30 kg, three times as heavy as a swan.

 

The researchers found the extinction rates differed depending on island and species characteristics. For example, larger islands had lower rates of extinction because they had larger populations of each bird species. Islands with more rainfall also had lower extinction rates because they experienced less deforestation by settlers. Bird species that were flightless and large-bodied had a higher rate of extinction because they were easier and more profitable to hunt and their lower rates of population growth inhibited recovery from overhunting or habitat loss.

 

“Flightless species were 33 times more likely to go extinct than those that could fly,” Prof Boyer explained. “Also, species that only populated a single island were 24 more times likely to go extinct than widespread species.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Deborah Verran's comment, April 13, 2013 6:39 PM
This image of the moa is one of the birds that became extinct in New Zealand after colonization. The adult birds were taller than humans.
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SPC realiza pruebas de acuaponia para la producción de alimentos en Fiji

SPC realiza pruebas de acuaponia para la producción de alimentos en Fiji | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
La Secretaria de la Comunidad del Pacífico (SPC, por sus siglas en inglés) viene investigando un nuevo sistema de producción de alimentos conocido como acuaponia para cultivar peces y vegetales. Esto es un intensivo uso de una pequeña cantidad de espacio, comparado con la agricultura tradicional o la piscicultura, y tiene un impacto ambiental mínimo debido a que el agua y los nutrientes son reciclados en vez de descargarlos” explicó Pickering.

 


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Viajar y trabajar por Nueva Zelanda

Viajar y trabajar por Nueva Zelanda | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it

Ahora tienes la oportunidad de vivir una experiencia inolvidable, viajar y trabajar por Nueva Zelanda será posible debido a que el gobierno neozelandés firmó un acuerdo con el gobierno español el cual permite a jóvenes de edades comprendidas entre los 18 y 30 años pedir una Working-Holiday Visa  para Nueva Zelanda.


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Dive for Water #Dive4Water - Islamic Relief Australia

Dive for Water #Dive4Water - Islamic Relief Australia | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
Scroll Down to see the latest information about the #Dive4Water Teams Click Here to buy your tickets Online Water? Water, life’s most basic need for survival is much more than just a drink. We use water in almost everything we do throughout the day.

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[Le Monde] THE 'MICRO' PACIFIC ISLANDS PAYING THE PRICE ...

[Le Monde] THE 'MICRO' PACIFIC ISLANDS PAYING THE PRICE ... | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
NOUMEA - The constellation of islands and atolls scattered across a vast swath of the Pacific Ocean micro-states are among those most exposed to the consequences of global warming: ocean acidification, multiplication of natural disasters, coral...

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Fe'iloakitau Kaho Tevi's curator insight, September 21, 2013 10:22 AM

Interesting perspective on the geopolitical interests in the Pacific region.

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List of endangered languages of the Pacific - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of endangered languages of the Pacific - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

introduction section may not adequately summarize its contents. lead section guidelines, please consider modifying the lead to provide an accessible overview of the article's key points in such a way that it can stand on its own as a concise version of the article. . (June 2013)

An endangered language is a language that it is at risk of falling out of use, generally because it has few surviving speakers. If it loses all of its native speakers, it becomes an extinct language.
Oceania (sometimes Oceanica[1]) is a geographical, often geopolitical, region consisting of numerous lands—mostly islands in the Pacific Ocean and vicinity. The term is often used in many languages to define one of the continents[2][3][4] and is one of eight terrestrial ecozones.
The languages spoken in Oceania, as defined geographically, form a larger set than the Oceanic languages, a linguistic subgroup of the Austronesian family also spoken in the Pacific. Among the languages cited below, only the ones spoken in Micronesia, Vanuatu and New Caledonia, as well as some languages of Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Is, are Oceanic languages.


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Los niños verdaderas víctimas del cambio climático |

Los niños verdaderas víctimas del cambio climático | | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
El cambio del clima trae consigo, sobre todo, en África subsahariana, Asía y Oceanía la subida de la temperatura con la sequía, lluvias torrenciales y

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Pescadores de Islas Salomón matan a 700 delfines por disputa con una ONG - Planeta CNN

Pescadores de Islas Salomón matan a 700 delfines por disputa con una ONG - Planeta CNN | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
Los habitantes de un pueblo pesquero de Oceanía mataron a los animales por supuesto incumplimiento de pago por parte de un grupo ecologista
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Australia to see worse drought thanks to intensifying El Niño

Australia to see worse drought thanks to intensifying El Niño | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
Compiled in collaboration with Australian Science Media Centre.New research by the Bureau of Meteorology – published shows El Niño will intensify between 2050 and 2100 thanks to climate change.El Ni…

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FIJI: Climate impact on tuna

FIJI: Climate impact on tuna | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it

The total annual catch of skipjack, yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna from the Western and Centre Pacific Ocean has recently been as high as 2.5 million tonnes.

Secretariat of the Pacific Community's principal fisheries scientist (climate change) Doctor Johann Bell said about half of this significant catch comes from the exclusive economic zones of Pacific Island countries and territories.

A large team of scientists has identified the changes that are likely to occur to the currents, water temperatures, dissolved oxygen levels and nutrient supply of the tropical Pacific Ocean that influence the distribution of tuna.

The results have been set out in a book published by SPC entitled Vulnerability of Tropical Pacific Fisheries and Aquaculture to Climate Change.

The changes to the ocean are likely to affect where tuna spawn, the survival and growth of juveniles, and where the adults feed.

"The abundant skipjack tuna are expected to move progressively east," Dr Bell said.

He said it was still too early to tell how many more skipjack tuna could be caught in Fiji's waters but some increase in catches was expected over the next few decades.

"The modelling done by the scientists must be considered as preliminary.

"It is very important that further investments in modelling the expected response of tuna to the changing ocean are made," he said.

"Only then will it be possible to advise the government of Fiji about the likely extent of changes in skipjack numbers within the nation's exclusive economic zone with confidence," he added.

The preliminary results of the tuna modelling were presented at a workshop held in Suva this week on 'Priority adaptations to climate change for fisheries and aquaculture in Fiji: reducing risks and capitalising on opportunities'.

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Pacific nation plans to relocate to Fiji

Pacific nation plans to relocate to Fiji | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it

Fearing that climate change could wipe out their entire Pacific archipelago, the leaders of Kiribati are considering an unusual backup plan: moving the populace to Fiji.


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Gerard Saliot made Fiji perfect holiday destination

Tourists get lots of gorgeous sandy beaches in the islands. It is a perfect place for the people to enjoy and relax in the breeze. 


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Mukesh Kumar's curator insight, October 16, 2013 6:50 AM

Do you want to go to a perfect destination this holiday? Fiji islands are situated in the heart of the Pacific Ocean. Islands are one of the most popular tourists’ destinations in Asia. Country is known for its beautiful sights, water activities, natural and man-made sceneries. It has exotic relaxation sites for the tourists to rejuvenate their body after adventurous activities. People usually go there to enjoy with their friends and family amid the exotic sights in the country. There are lots more than the tourists expect from a holiday destination. Gerard Saliot is the person behind in making these country tourists paradise. He works tirelessly to promote the tourism industry of the country. Due to his effort, country is witnessing large inflow of tourists from every part of the world.

 

It is a perfect place for every type of people. Country is surrounded by the water bodies thus, forming lots of beautiful water sights and activities. People visiting there can do adventures activities like yatch and jet boat riding in the sea. Ferries are used to carry the tourists from one island to another, also called island hopping to see the beautiful vegetation. Soft coral reefs are found surrounding the islands and known for their beauties. Divers swim down the sea to see the beautiful flora and fauna of the sea bed. Couples get special moment together in luxurious boat operated for newlywed couple in the blue lagoons.

 

Tourists get lots of gorgeous sandy beaches in the islands. It is a perfect place for the people to enjoy and relax in the breeze. There are resorts in every part of the islands providing excellent service to relax after adventurous day. Traditional spas using herbs and olive for the massage help tourist to relief their body stress. One can enjoy in the garden, parks, sanctuaries, hills, and tropical vegetation surrounding the islands. Cheap hotel and restaurants are abundant and ideal for the non-vegetarian. Go to this country to visit and explore the places with your own eyes.

 

More info:- http://louisgerardsaliot.weebly.com/

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El Volcán Más Increíble de Todos los Tiempos

El vídeo volcán más increíble jamás filmada! Geoff Mackley, Bradley Ambrose, Nathan Berg, después de una lucha épica con el clima para 35 días, que se convirtieron en las primeras personas a conseguir tan cerca de lago de lava del volcán Marum famoso en Ambrym Island, Vanuatu. Viniendo a 30 metros del lago de lava por un curso de agua, fue posible soportar el calor por sólo 6 segundos. Con un equipo de respiración de Bomberos y traje a prueba de calor proximidad era posible estar de pie en el borde mismo y ver el increíble espectáculo por más de 40 minutos.


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Tourism Australia's facebook page hits five million fans

Tourism Australia's facebook page hits five million fans | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it

"Tourism Australia’s ambition to create the ‘world’s biggest social media team’ has taken another big step forward with its Facebook page, www.facebook.com/seeaustralia, hitting five million fans worldwide over the weekend – confirming its status as the most popular tourism destination page on the planet."


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Liam Parsons's curator insight, September 8, 2014 8:43 PM

Tourism Australia's Facebook page hits five million likes

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Oceania^^

Aquest video diu tots els rius, llacs, costes, illas..

Tabé diu quina població hi ha i moltes coses més...

MIREU-LO


Via andreä de mas
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Anna's comment, January 18, 2012 3:55 AM
Molt chulu!
andreä de mas's comment, January 18, 2012 10:56 AM
mmerci!:)
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[VIDEO] - oceaniaeuropeamericasafricaasia

rough stats on the 5 continents...

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¿Cuál ha sido el primer país en obtener toda su electricidad a partir de energía solar?

¿Cuál ha sido el primer país en obtener toda su electricidad a partir de energía solar? | Oceania Hoy! Diario Nacional | Scoop.it
Tokelau, un archipiélago de Oceanía situado en el Pacífico, se acaba de convertir en el primer territorio del mundo que obtiene toda su electricida...
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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

 

This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.

 

"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."

 

Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?

 

Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 2015 1:40 AM

The title of this article seemed to be a little bit of a misnomer given how the geographic forces impact Papua New Guinea. Part of the population caters to the tourist desire to see the "exotic." However, this Papaua New Guinea is in the past. While the rest of the population lives in the present where the citizens live without the tourist dictating how they live.   

 

Given the impact of the forces, the split makes figuring out which Papa New Guinea is actually the most "authentic" is tricky. There are elements of Papa New Guinea in each place. The perfect way to obtain authenticity is blending them as the title suggest, but that is not that case. Under the circumstances, I think the village in which tourist are not present are the most "authentic." It is because of the tourist that the past village exits and while some members of the population like that this helps preserve their past culture, Papa New Guinea has clearly started to move on.  It reminds me of the Plymouth plantation field trips in which the tourist view america during the times of the pilgrims. Clearly, America has moved on, but continues to honor their roots. Due to this idea of moving on, I think the other village that shows the present is more authentic because it is a closer measure of what the village realistically acts like without interference from the outside world.  


While, I realize Papa New Guinea is more than the past, a fair amount of the world doesn't. As a few tourist mentioned, they were eager to hear about cannibalism despite the practice stopping years ago. Yet, from an outsiders perspective, they don't see this other Papa New Guinea and because the country plays into this idea of a village stuck in the past, it gives the world the wrong impression. As such, I wonder how how much catering to the rest of the world holds Papa New Guinea back economically. Being perceived as less developed won't generate lenders and living up to that expectation curbs other modern economic sectors. So it seems the overall affect might actually be more detrimental then helpful from an economic stance.   

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:38 PM

I believe these indigenous people found a way to survive.  They were smart!  Globalization and tourism were gonna happen with or without them.  Now they found away to keep on existing.  Authentic?  How do they live their lives now, thats authentic.  The past history is just that, the past.  Its a commodity because they've found a way to exploit their culture to benefit them.  

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:47 PM

This podcast talks about two different areas of the same area. One section living in the past and one living in the present. I believe that the section that is living in the past is more authentic. This is a group of people who have had to learn their way of life. The present would have had to learn to adapt to new ways in life and this new way would be truly authentic to their religion.