Obesity
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Stress & Support

Stress & Support | Obesity | Scoop.it
Do you eat more when you are feeling emotional or stressed? Do you eat differently when you're with certain friends or family members? Learn about how these influences impact your weight, and how you can create a healthier personal environment!
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 27, 2013 9:56 PM
How stress can conduce obesity<br>Golden Ideas:<br>If one is struggling with weight it is better to focus on positive things one is doing in terms of diet and exercise and something as a simple as taking a walk to reduce stress can go a long way. Sleep is another important factor in that it controls hormones for better health; social relationships also helps coping with obesity.<br>Thorns:<br>Social networking can lead to unhealthy relationships. Our society is continuing to put more stress upon people in school and the work force. <br>Questions:<br>Why is stress so prevalent in our society to lead to obesity?<br>What some techniques for reducing stress that don't take a lot of time?
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Why the Campaign to Stop America's Obesity Crisis Keeps Failing

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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 21, 2013 1:46 AM
The Tired Approach<br>Strengths:<br>This article posits that the regular approach of tackling obesity particularly promoted by HBO's weight of the nation, i.e. calories in=calories out so exercise+diet=healthy, does not work. It points to the first obesity clinic opening in 1930s to combat the problem despite the reccession and lack of food. It asserts that it's the type of calories rather than the amount so the starchy depression era foods could cause obesity. This is in line with the China Study to some degree.<br>Weaknesses:<br>This article implies that there has been an obesity epidemic in the U.S. for years, starting in the 30s despite strong evidence to the contrary. The article also argues that exercise doesn't lead to weight loss because the people interviewed in Weight of the nation have to exercise for their job and are still obese. I don't really agree with this on a personal level and a common sense level.<br>Improvement:<br>Could come up with stats of obesity in the past, there is lots of recent data but not old. Could come up with ways to improve the implementation of his ideas<br>Obstacles:<br>Old data could be hard to find/gather. Again implementation is hard, especially on a national level.
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The 'Healthy Obese' and Their Healthy Fat Cells

The 'Healthy Obese' and Their Healthy Fat Cells | Obesity | Scoop.it
Up to a third of obese adults show no signs of health problems like high cholesterol, hypertension or impending diabetes. New research suggests their fat cells may be one reason.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 9, 2013 7:42 PM
A bright spot in obesity:
What:
Researchers are starting to pay more attention to people who are metabolically healthy obese, that is, obese people who can make more fat cells to deal with the extra fat accumulating on their bodies. By contrast unhealthy obese people cannot make new cells and so fat gets stored in paces in shouldn't be, like the heart. It is estimated that up to 1/3 of obese adults could be metabolically healthy but it has not been show whether this state is permanent or transient.
Comments:
Lots of people found the article interesting, liking the fact that it dealt with the biology of fat. Lots of people were also skeptical of the idea of "healthy obesity" and tended to think that the "healthy obesity" was a transient stage. However, one commenter suggested that since there are unhealthy skinny people, there could be healthy obese people.
What I think:
I think research on this topic could be beneficial, and could lead to some insights on how the body stores fat. However, I do not think that "healthy obese" people will be free from health complications and certainly will not escape the social stigma of being obese. Right now good diets and regular exercise are still the best way of dealing with obesity.
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Dietary Report Card Disappoints

Dietary Report Card Disappoints | Obesity | Scoop.it
An analysis of Americans’ diets from 1970 to 2010 reveals we have a way to go in cutting down on harmful fats and starches to ward off obesity, diabetes and heart disease.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 30, 2013 4:14 PM
What the U.S. eats:
About:
We are eating more of everything than we were in 1970 and this mostly to blame for obesity in the U.S. We are eating more grains, sweets, beef and pork while we should be going for fish, vegetables and fruit. Restaurants are distorting our portion sizes and seemingly healthier alternatives aren't.
Comments:
Many commenters argue that this information is gratuitous—"of course we should we eat more good stuff, we all know what a healthy diet looks like" type comment. Other commenters argue that our inactive lifestyle is to blame or complain that dietary advice is often inconsistent between articles/reports. One commenter says that this article gives a simplistic view of the obesity problem—it is not just an equation of calories in, calories out.
What I think:
I agree that as a whole we all need to eat less and eat better foods. But I also agree that how much weight you gain or lose is different for everybody. I think we all know what a healthy diet looks like but and our choices are definitely a big factor in our weight but those choices can be hard to change.
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LIFE Magazine’s Vintage Fat Shaming

LIFE Magazine’s Vintage Fat Shaming | Obesity | Scoop.it
HowStuffWorks blogger Cristen Conger writes about fat shaming in the 1950s.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 26, 2013 10:37 PM
History of Obesity in Culture
Golden Ideas:
Points out how "fat shaming" started in the 50s with specific example of a LIFE Magazine article. The LIFE article declared that obesity was the greatest health problem while obesity rates were only 3% in adults.
The LIFE article argues that obesity comes from moral choices rooted in greed and gluttony when this is flat-out wrong.
Thorns:
The article says that Dorothy, a student in the 50s, eats because she struggles with emotional turmoil when the article itself can be a cause of emotional turmoil.
The myths presented in this story are still being perpetrated throughout culture today.
Are there any newer articles that are similar to this one from the 50s
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Michelle Obama Wants You To Drink More Water

Michelle Obama Wants You To Drink More Water | Obesity | Scoop.it
The First Lady wants you to drink more water.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 16, 2013 3:56 PM
Yucca:
Golden Ideas: The initiative is a step in the right direction but the lack of education behind it, specifically reasons why more water is healthy, leaves it a bit thin and superficial.
Is water consumption really the problem? Most people actually drink enough water, obesity is caused by drinks like soda.
Thorns: The main participants of this initiative are huge corporations, who ultimately do not back the message, but are there for the money.
One out of four kids don't drink water in a given day and they would benefit from more water consumption but won't see any improvement in health if soda isn't dropped.
Questions: How will this new initiative focused on water affect obesity rates?
Is the message of buying bottled water really the best to be sending?
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The Food System

The Food System | Obesity | Scoop.it
Everyone makes choices about what to eat. The food system influences which choices are available.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 27, 2013 9:26 PM
The American Food System<br>Golden Ideas:<br>As the food system shifted to fertilizer and the U.S. gave corn and soy subsidies, tons of inexpensive food was and is produced. In terms of shipping and serving, larger portions of unhealthy foods are much cheaper and perpetuate food deserts and swamps where it is impossible to access healthy food.<br>Thorns:<br>The price of healthy foods like fruit and vegetables are rising faster than inflation, making unhealthy foods a more viable option for most people. We also invest less time in cooking meals ourselves, forcing us to eat the larger and unhealthier meals at restaurants<br>Questions:<br>Who is affected most by these food swamps and deserts?<br>Is anything being done to try and combat the consumption of high calorie foods?
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Obesity

Hank tells us some of the surprising things that could be causing or contributing to the obesity epidemic. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/...
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 21, 2013 2:23 AM
A Multi-Faceted Problem:<br>About:<br>This video provides a very good overview of obesity in America and the world in that it is a global phenomenon and that it facts all types of people in the developed world. It also acknowledges that calories in=calories out is basically right and that diet and exercise will likely lead to weight loss but that there are other factors. There is lack of sleep which has effects on hormones that affect eating, obese genes that get passed down, and tons of new possibly adverse chemicals that we deal with everyday. <br>Comments:<br>Well it's youtube so there aren't that many great comments but it provides an insight into the mindset of America. There are an insane amount of comments saying "just don't eat so fucking much." This marginalizes people who can't afford to eat great as well as people who eat healthy but are affected by other factors. THis is no doubt an unhealthy mindset<br>What I think:<br>I think is a good video to get a broad picture of issues and problems of obesity but it is made for the general public so some of the information seems to be cut and simplified. They also don't list any sources for their data so that's a problem.
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20111116065942

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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, October 9, 2013 3:59 AM
Long term and sustainable solutions to obesity.
p.135-144
Golden Ideas:
Obesity can only be combatted with a diet of plant-based whole foods diet and regular, rather than short term weight loss gimmicks or gene-based treatment.
It doesn't matter about how much you eat, it matters what you eat. If you have a great diet, there is no benefit to restricting calorie consumption.
Thorns:
In 2002 obesity related health care costs were 100 billion dollars.
We spend 30-40 billion dollars on ineffective weight loss programs and diets
15% of children are obese where another 15% is at risk.
Questions:
What do the heath care costs of obesity look like now?
What do childhood obesity rates look like now?
What are some misconceptions people have about weight loss/obesity that this article hints at?
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Obesity in the USA: Photos From the Early Fight Against a Plague, 1954 | LIFE | TIME.com

Obesity in the USA: Photos From the Early Fight Against a Plague, 1954 | LIFE | TIME.com | Obesity | Scoop.it
The crisis of obesity in the United States is not going away. Here, LIFE.com recalls a take on the subject from six decades ago that feels prescient.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 30, 2013 3:43 PM
Continuation of fat myths:
Golden Ideas:
This new LIFE author agrees with the old LIFE article—that obesity is a dangerous "plague."
Agrees that Dorothy's struggle was aptly described and is the norm across America
Thorns:
While it is true that mny people struggle with obesity and body image, their struggle, at least in part, is not their fault.
It was certainly not an epidemic when the original article was written and it shouldn't be called that now, despite obesity's prevalence.
Questions:
Article mentioned we will have to pay more for insurance of obese people, I would like to see data, if there is any, to support this.
How prevalent are these false ideas about obesity in society?
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Childhood obesity: A problem of will and money

Childhood obesity: A problem of will and money | Obesity | Scoop.it
Given the dire consequences of severe obesity left unaddressed, pecuniary neglect is at best penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 26, 2013 10:23 PM
Obesity as a Cultural Problem
Strengths:
The article posits that "the causes of obesity are not so much within us, as all around us." The causes of obesity lie within peer pressure and fat shaming and is not a cause of something wrong within a person.
We talk about obesity as though it should be treated with drugs and surgery and counseling, obesity is a "disease," but these treatments don't get to the root of the problem. The cause is societal not biological, i.e. not a disease
Weaknesses:
There is no data for the claims they make—they do acknowledge the lack of it though.
Propose only one cultural solution to the issue
Improvement:
Get Data on both how obesity is cultural and on the effectiveness of their solution.
Obstacles:
Changing culture and society is a huge task and not going to happen with a huge shift.
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Is the US Winning the War on Childhood Obesity? | athenahealth Blog

Is the US Winning the War on Childhood Obesity? | athenahealth Blog | Obesity | Scoop.it
Iyue Sung, Director of Core Analytics, and Rick McKellar, an intern on the Core Analytics Team, also contributed to this report. When Washington Post writer Lydia DePillis recently released a blog post entitled “Looks like the ...
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Luca Tramontozzi's comment, September 19, 2013 3:15 PM
Option Kale:
Strengths:
The article uses actual height and weight figures from their database rather than what parents say their children are.
Analytics are super updated due to their cloud system, they say child obesity rates have stayed the same.
Weaknesses:
Their database is not huge, so small sample size.
Improvement: Provide some data for local change in obesity rates.
Maybe offer suggestions on how to scale effective local treatments to the national level.
Obstacles: Doing something on a national level is really hard to organize and execute.