oAnth-miscellaneous
Follow
Find tag "pedagogics"
5.5K views | +2 today
oAnth-miscellaneous
offene Ablage: nothing to hide | compilations & selected entries from my tumblelog diary at soup.io
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
Scoop.it!

Will Free Benefit the Rich? How Free and Open Education Might Widen Digital Divides | video talk (~70 min) by Justin Reich at the Berkman Center | offene Ablage: nothing to hide

Will Free Benefit the Rich? How Free and Open Education Might Widen Digital Divides | video talk (~70 min) by Justin Reich at the Berkman Center |  offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth-miscellaneous | Scoop.it

original URL at the Berkman Center - http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2012/01/reich

 

Tuesday, Janary 17, 2012

 

The explosion of open education content resources and freely available collaboration and media production platforms represents one of the most exciting emerging trends in education. These tools create unprecedented opportunities for teachers to design and personalize curriculum and to give students opportunities to collaborate, publish, and take responsibility for their own learning. Many education technology and open education advocates hope that the widespread availability of free resources and platforms will disproportionately benefit disadvantaged students, by making technology resources broadly available that were once only available to affluent students. It is possible, however, that affluent schools and students have a greater capacity to take up new innovations, even free ones, and so new tools and resources that appear in the ecology of education will widen rather than ameliorate digital divides. In this presentation, we will examine evidence for both the "tech as equalizer" and "tech as accelerator of digital divides" hypotheses, and we will examine technology innovations and interventions that specifically target learners with the most needs. A lively discussion will follow to consider how educators, technologists, and policymakers can address issues of educational digital inequalities in their work. [...]

 

--------------------

 

// oAnth: The first 30 min are mostly of interest

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"
Scoop.it!

Learn how to code - theatlantic.com | offene Ablage: nothing to hide

Learn how to code - theatlantic.com | offene Ablage: nothing to hide | oAnth-miscellaneous | Scoop.it
original article - theatlantic.com - 201106:
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/print/2011/06/how-i-failed-failed-and-finally-succeeded-at-learning-how-to-code/239855

---------------------------------

[...]

What's especially neat about it is that someone who has never programmed -- someone who doesn't even know what a program is -- can learn to write code that solves this problem in less than three hours. I've seen it happen. All it takes is a little hunger. You just have to want the answer.

That's the pedagological ballgame: get your student to want to find something out. All that's left after that is to make yourself available for hints and questions. "That student is taught the best who is told the least."

It's like sitting a kid down at the ORIC-1. Kids are naturally curious. They love blank slates: a sandbox, a bag of LEGOs. Once you show them a little of what the machine can do they'll clamor for more. They'll want to know how to make that circle a little smaller or how to make that song go a little faster. They'll imagine a game in their head and then relentlessly fight to build it.

Along the way, of course, they'll start to pick up all the concepts you wanted to teach them in the first place. And those concepts will stick because they learned them not in a vacuum, but in the service of a problem they were itching to solve.

Project Euler, named for the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler, is popular (more than 150,000 users have submitted 2,630,835 solutions) precisely because Colin Hughes -- and later, a team of eight or nine hand-picked helpers -- crafted problems that lots of people get the itch to solve. And it's an effective teacher because those problems are arranged like the programs in the ORIC-1's manual, in what Hughes calls an "inductive chain":

The problems range in difficulty and for many the experience is inductive chain learning. That is, by solving one problem it will expose you to a new concept that allows you to undertake a previously inaccessible problem. So the determined participant will slowly but surely work his/her way through every problem.

This is an idea that's long been familiar to video game designers, who know that players have the most fun when they're pushed always to the edge of their ability. The trick is to craft a ladder of increasingly difficult levels, each one building on the last. New skills are introduced with an easier version of a challenge -- a quick demonstration that's hard to screw up -- and certified with a harder version, the idea being to only let players move on when they've shown that they're ready. The result is a gradual ratcheting up the learning curve.

[...]

----------------------------------------------------

cf.

http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/06/learning-to-program-project-euler.php

on Soup.io:
http://02mydafsoup-01.soup.io/post/136835734/Learn-to-Program-By-Giving-Yourself-Open

more...
No comment yet.