O_Berard
Follow
Find
1.2K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Olivier Berard
onto O_Berard
Scoop.it!

Social Business Intelligence | BI Blog | Business Intelligence (BI) Blog

Social Business Intelligence | BI Blog | Business Intelligence (BI) Blog | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Social Media and Business Intelligence together can help businesses bring out insights never experienced before.
more...
No comment yet.
O_Berard
Autour du 2.0 orienté Entreprise
Curated by Olivier Berard
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Olivier Berard - Time2change2: Et si une (la) solution venait d’Oslo ?

Olivier Berard - Time2change2: Et si une (la) solution venait d’Oslo ? | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Transformation in an age of disruptive change

Transformation in an age of disruptive change | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Transformation in an age of disruptive change - Successful transformation requires an intimate understanding of the human side - Torben Rick
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Olivier Berard from The Social Web
Scoop.it!

The Future of Work is Already Here - Seven powerful models for work in the connected, collaborative, creative, Big Data economy

The Future of Work is Already Here - Seven powerful models for work in the connected, collaborative, creative, Big Data economy | O_Berard | Scoop.it

There is a lingering notion in the world of business and beyond that organizations are things with four walls, that employees are people who report to work inside them every day for years on end, that work is a matter of executing on defined “KPIs,” and that success is a product of climbing ladders and exerting an ever-greater span of control. But the fact is, we’re in the midst of a great reshuffling of the talent deck.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Stephen Dale
more...
Stephen Dale's curator insight, June 6, 9:06 AM

Organizations and leaders today must focus on unleashing human capacity—designing environments and systems for work that inspire individuals to contribute their full imagination, initiative, and passion every day—and on aggregating human capability—leveraging new social, mobile, and digital technologies to activate, enlist, and organize talent across boundaries.

 

The Management Innovation eXchange (MIX) launched the Unlimited Human Potential M-Prize to unearth the most progressive practices and boldest ideas around those two challenges. They recently announce the winners of the M-Prize, selected from over one hundred entries from every kind of organization and every corner of the world.

Meet the winners (in alphabetical order):

 

- Nomatik Coworking by Andrew Jones, Tony Bacigalupo and David Walker

- Horizontal Management at Vagas.com by Mario Kaphan

- Collaborative Funding: Dissolve Authority, Empower Everyone, and Crowdsource a Smarter, Transparent Budget by Alanna Krause

- How We Harnessed  Big Data and Social Technology to Empower and Engage Employees by Chelsea Lefaivre

- Enterprise Knowledge Graph – One Graph to Connect Them All by Lukas Masuch

- Incubating Intrapreneurs to Revitalize Customer Business by Shyam Sundar Nagarajan

- Developing Tomorrow’s Talent: A Girl, A Blog, and 30 Days to Business Impact by Clare Norman

 

#kmers #socbiz

Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Edito : apprendre à travailler autrement

Edito : apprendre à travailler autrement | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Deux facteurs portent le succès des projets d'entreprise 2.0. Sans le sponsoring des directions générales, ces initiatives courent à l’échec. Ensuite il faut motiver les collaborateurs pour qu'ils comprennent très vite l'intérêt qu'ils pourront en tirer s'ils participent.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Re-wiring for the Complex Workplace

Re-wiring for the Complex Workplace | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Socialogy Interview: Celine Schillinger

Socialogy Interview: Celine Schillinger | O_Berard | Scoop.it
I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting Celine, our involvement has been limited to virtual discourse online. I hope we can someday sit down face-to-face.


About Celine Schillinger






Celine describes herself this way:




An agent for change, I help global organizations thrive in the new social economy. Social re-engineering of business and organizations is a passion, to increase engagement and business performance. 




As Senior Director, Stakeholder Engagement, Dengue at Sanofi Pasteur, Celine is leading a social re-engineering of the company’s largest vaccine program.


The Interview


Stowe Boyd: I read a piece you wrote last year, Can Social Be Top Down?, and I thought we could start there. You noted that the conventional thinking about adoption of social tools and practices is that top-level executives have to act as advocates, but you question that. It’s obvious that other innovations — like bring your own device, file sync-and-share — don’t require advocacy of top executives. You made the point that today’s executives came up in earlier, competitive, and less cooperative work cultures. So, do you think we have to wait for this generation of execs to die, or can we change cultural norms despite them?

We can’t just stay passive and wait for better times, because adaptation to the social age is not a question of generation. - Celine Schillinger

Celine Schillinger: We can’t just wait for the old-minded leaders to disappear, because unfortunately they have bred and promoted younger generations of managers who think and behave exactly the same. I know many 30-40 year old “high potential” employees and executives who are totally ignorant of social tools and practices. They “don’t believe” [sigh] in Twitter, they take pride in not being on Facebook or else (LinkedIn is the limit), and they “have no time” to learn about available internal social tools and communities.


More importantly, they have full faith in the value of current operating models: pyramidal, elitist, command-and-control, segmented, analytical, process and compliance-based models. Their ambition is to make their way through the system, not to change it. To climb the corporate ladder, they reproduce what has seemingly worked well for their role models: presenteeism, obedience, and power games. Young and ambitious women as well as visible minority people realize at some point that this isn’t quite enough: in many corporate cultures, it remains much easier to climb the ladder when you’re a white man.


Anyway, we can’t just stay passive and wait for better times, because adaptation to the social age is not a question of generation.


We can always try to educate and convince the top-level executives, but I’m afraid focusing on this makes us lose time and energy that are needed for more useful endeavors. You have to pick your battles. In my opinion, it is much more valuable to 1) invest in one’s own understanding of this new world, and 2) build / contribute to the communities one needs to move forward.


We can change cultural norms by being the change.


Even in the absence of decision-making power, we can drive organizations into new directions – by embodying new ways of working (new behaviors, really). If we are astute… and connected, we can achieve great changes. Connection is our major asset. Deep connections, to learn from others, spread change, and establish purpose-based alliances (these are the strongest). Large-scale connections, that are made possible by social technologies, to show our muscles and be heard by the small corporate elite.


SB: There’s a kind of deep pessimism about internal change in your words, even if you are optimistic about being able to make changes via a movement of the adherents of a new work culture, who operate outside the business. Is that what you are getting at?


CS: Ah! A roller coaster is probably what describes best the mood of change agents. Whether we are consultants or internal practitioners, we go through successive phases of gloom and doom, when culture change seems at a standstill, and exhilaration when we achieve progresses. There is no small victory in this respect. Every opportunity we have to make people and organizations work differently shall be seized. The more concrete examples we are able to show, the more stories we can share, the easier it will be to overcome ignorance and resistance. Seeking support and external recognition outside of the organization, to push change forward internally, has worked pretty well in my case. Had I known how difficult it was, in particular in a traditional and conservative industry, I would have started much earlier. But there’s a strong appetite for change within organizations, too.


If someone wants to change something in their workplace, I recommend they search for like-minded fellow workers. People don’t speak up because they believe they’re alone and it is risky and useless; but when they realize they’re actually several, or even numerous, people feel stronger to drive change.


This is actually where I started my “transformational journey” into driving change. It all started by triggering, somewhat by chance, an internal community for gender balance on our corporate social network. The tool was available, so we seized it for a totally new type of initiative: self-organized, bottom-up, inclusive (functional and hierarchical silo agnostic), aiming at creating value. It has shaken the organization pretty much. We need more of this to disseminate social practices in the corporate reality, and ensure their sustainability.

If someone wants to change something in their workplace, I recommend they search for like-minded fellow workers. People don’t speak up because they believe they’re alone and it is risky and useless; but when they realize they’re actually several, or even numerous, people feel stronger to drive change. - Celine Schillinger

SB: Lee Bryant was the first that I know of who said ‘If you start going bottom up, everything has to be bottom up’. By extension, to adopt bottom-up self-organization, then the established top-down sanctioned organizational power structure is undermined. So, social practices and tools are inherently subversive. Your thoughts?


CS: This is very true: social practices and tools are subversive. But we shouldn’t say it too loud, so as not to make social look “dangerous”. Already, the corporate gate keepers perceive social as a challenge, and imagine a daunting world of activists and anarchy. They’re mentally framed by the industrial age management structures and practices, where order and control are far more important than flexibility and creativity. They see the consequences of social in its political variations (Arab Spring) and its use by unhappy customers or citizens. They certainly don’t want this to happen within the corporate walls.


As a result, most companies give a lot of lip service to social collaboration, but don’t invest seriously into it. Or, they focus on tools, because that’s the easy part. They leave the organizational reshuffling and culture change aside – and then wonder why adoption isn’t higher.


Inner social advocates are often mistaken for (or rather: caricatured as) idealists. Our main challenge is to explain that social is actually the new normal.


You can be for or against evolution, but evolution doesn’t care! The world is changing whatever companies do (or do not), and those that don’t adapt will just disappear. I’m doing my share to explain this, and frame it in a positive way. Lee Bryant provides precious inspiration to me, as does the Change Agents Worldwide group to which I belong.


SB: Alfred North Whitehead said ‘It is the business of the future to be dangerous’ so we can’t actually divide the two. I think the real challenge is getting people — managers and workforce, both — to grasp the fact that we are in a time when going slow and steady is perilous, and the counterintuitive acceptance of increased risk tolerance is the surest path forward. That’s not idealism, it’s pragmatism.


I agree that many companies are mired in the past, which is why I think the first step has to be getting people to realize that we are in a new era — the postnormal — where most of the premises that defined the previous postmodern era have dramatically shifted. Have you tried that approach?

Inner social advocates are often mistaken for (or rather: caricatured as) idealists. Our main challenge is to explain that social is actually the new normal. - Celine Schillinger

CS: It is utterly important to explain how the world has changed and why the old ways of working are recipes for disaster. We can’t just tell people they have to work differently, full stop. It is our responsibility as change agents to educate our colleagues, our managers, our organizations. We can do this by organizing educational workshops, by inviting external speakers, by coaching people individually, by sharing stories arising from our own, connected experience. I do this as much as I can.


Another powerful way is to connect those who “get it”. Creating a network of advocates facilitates the dissemination of the vision. It takes a network to spread a network culture. I wrote about this in my last blog post [link], which is about making organizations social. I believe this is about listening to people’s voices, letting them speak, encouraging them to speak (I hardly use the word “empower” now, since I’ve read this great piece by John Wenger) and leveraging the power of free speech. It starts with explaining what the new world is about, as far as we know it.


The new era is full of uncertainties, which can be fantastic opportunities. Companies are still trying to split complexity into bits of simple activities that can be standardized through procedures and administered by a specialist functions (= the usual way). Instead, they should quickly understand their survival depends on shifting mindsets to embrace complexity. There is no other way than developing flexible, adaptive, diverse, network-based structures, cultures and practices.


SB: The abiding question of Socialogy is to ask the question ‘what domain of science should we be looking into for better ideas about how business might be better conducted?’ Recent answers include social network theory, biology, and complexity. What’s your take?


CS: Those fields are indeed very interesting and obviously useful. But I’m a bit puzzled by science worshipping. Science is not the answer to everything. We will not “decode” all about emotions, irrational behaviors, coincidences, life. Science enables human progress, but people are not driven by science. Sometimes, things happen through stuff we don’t understand, and it’s fine.


I’m more interested in impact – changing behaviors – than decoding. So, beside searching for answers in science, I believe we should invest into developing people’s humanity, empathy, capacity to connect with one another. It’s time to bring back the humanities in the center of the picture. We can develop human connectedness through arts, literature, philosophy. Sharing questioning and emotions is at the core of what makes us more human; culture is a great way to foster this.


Globalization is a chance in this respect, as we can create bonds across borders more easily now, but surging inequalities (as shown by Thomas Piketty’s research) are a serious threat to connectedness. We have to do something about this. When we are more able to connect, when we understand each other better, then we’ll conduct better business.


SB: I’m happy to imagine the soft sciences — like anthropology, ethnography, and behavioral research — playing a large role in future business. The evidence suggests that business culture is afraid of creativity — witness the research on the astonishing traditionalism of most CEOs, and why creatives are sidelined — so I’m afraid that I hold little hope of the humanities and arts getting a foothold in business in the next five or even ten years.


Thanks for your time and thoughts.


CS: Thank you Stowe for giving me the chance to speak. Your work inspires many change agents. I hope together we can make the “future of work” concept become soon the “new normal” of work.


This post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. I’ve been compensated to contribute to this program, but the opinions expressed in this post are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

T’as vu mon mail ? … Non, pourquoi ? - Revolution-RH

T’as vu mon mail ? … Non, pourquoi ? - Revolution-RH | O_Berard | Scoop.it
La culture du mail en entreprise le meilleur ennemi de notre millénaire et cela toute génération confondue. Sommes-nous sujets à une crise du clavier ?
more...
talkSpirit's curator insight, April 16, 4:00 AM

Et si on signait la fin du mail ? Il y a de nouvelles manières de rentre la communication plus efficace, et surtout plus collaborative. Le mail a été un tremplin : mission accomplie, passons à la suite. 

Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

A l’ère des réseaux, le management doit évoluer !

A l’ère des réseaux, le management doit évoluer ! | O_Berard | Scoop.it

Ce billet est le premier d'une série d'articles écrits par Jon Husband (localisés en français par mes soins) que j'ai beaucoup de plaisir à partager avec vous sur ce blog ! Merci de votre intérêt, ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Learning, leading and Spartacus moments

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Go With The Flow (CIO Magazine interview)

Go With The Flow (CIO Magazine interview) | O_Berard | Scoop.it
I hope the title is not too misleading.

The interview is from 2007, but I think that the issues discussed are still front-and-center pertinent (please feel free to offer different perspectives in t
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

50 ideas to change L & D

50 ideas to change L & D | O_Berard | Scoop.it
The smell of change is in the air!  Yesterday  I read a post on TeachThought  called 50 crazy ideas to change education and I tweeted it. Andrew Jacobs was on Twitter and he responded and the follo...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Let the dinosaurs die and the lurkers lurk. Insights on seeding adoption of enterprise social networks.

Let the dinosaurs die and the lurkers lurk. Insights on seeding adoption of enterprise social networks. | O_Berard | Scoop.it
On Thursday, Feb. 27, my class of graduate students from the Master of Science in Learning & Organizational Change program at Northwestern University organized a Twitter chat to explore the fol...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

A simple approach to KM | Harold Jarche

A simple approach to KM | Harold Jarche | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

L’entreprise démunie face à la nouvelle exigence d’apprendre

L’entreprise démunie face à la nouvelle exigence d’apprendre | O_Berard | Scoop.it
" Petite Poucette s’ennuie au travail" , voilà comment Michel Serres décrit les perceptions de la jeune génération dans son...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

A world without email? Still a fantasy for many workers | simply communicate

A world without email? Still a fantasy for many workers | simply communicate | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

ATOS : Le programme Zero EmailTM d'Atos remporte un Prix d'Excellence

ATOS : Le programme Zero EmailTM d'Atos remporte un Prix d'Excellence | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Paris, 21 mai 2014 - Atos, acteur international des services informatiques, a annoncé aujourd'hui avoir remporté avec blueKiwi Software le prix Forrester Groundswell de l'excellence dans les médias sociaux pour son programme Zero emailTM. Ted Sch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Olivier Berard from Collaborationweb
Scoop.it!

7 Tools to Help Improve the Modern Collaborative Workplace

7 Tools to Help Improve the Modern Collaborative Workplace | O_Berard | Scoop.it
The modern workplace demands flexible communication systems that allow people to work anytime and anywhere - all while maintaining a sense of teamwork.

Via David Hain
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Distributed Collaboration is Rapidly Evolving

Distributed Collaboration is Rapidly Evolving | O_Berard | Scoop.it
One of the biggest disruptors of the last few years has been the distributed nature of work. People can now work pretty much anywhere, anytime, with anyone, on any content. And though content still plays a critical part, I am starting to see context as more critical for any type of collaboration. Without a common context it is hard for two or more people to work together. Tools like email can work for one to many interactions (if you cc the whole organization), but not many to many. Web confere Topic: Social Business.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Olivier Berard from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World | O_Berard | Scoop.it

The basic strength of hierarchies is that if they are designed well -- the departments/silos make sense in light of your business strategy and your competition, there aren't too many levels, the rules that accompany the hierarchy are smart and sensible -- hierarchies can be an incredibly efficient and reliable way to get work done. In fact nobody has found a more efficient and reliable way.

 

The problem is that hierarchies change slowly to changing conditions, to new rapid-fire strategic challenges, to technological discontinuities. They're not agile, they can't jump to the left or to the right quickly. In today's world you have to be fast and agile, but you also have to be efficient and reliable.

 

So the problem is that a well-designed hierarchy is still needed but it's insufficient. You need two systems, one that can handle speed with agility, and one that gets the work done today with quality and efficiency. And the two have to work together hand in glove.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
JeffMiller79's curator insight, April 23, 5:33 AM

Danger of Hierarchy in a Fast-Moving World  #fb

Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 5, 4:58 AM

Good interview Huff Post with John Kotter on management, structure and innovation. About the difference between networks and a hierarchical structure Kotter says: "With information liberated from silos and levels, there's a whole different sort of conversation that can take place both in creating ideas and then implementing ideas."

Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work)

8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work) | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Preliminary results from a two-year experiment in self-management.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Tracks to the Future for PR and Communications | Binhammer Social Business

Tracks to the Future for PR and Communications | Binhammer Social Business | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Enterprise Social Networks May One Day Replace Email | Innovation Insights | Wired.com

Enterprise Social Networks May One Day Replace Email | Innovation Insights | Wired.com | O_Berard | Scoop.it
Salesforce Chatter. Image courtesy of Salesforce. Corporate communication is ripe for disruption. Thanks in part to social networking and the abundance of
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Entreprise collaborative on en est où ? | Blog d'Anthony Poncier

Entreprise collaborative on en est où ? | Blog d'Anthony Poncier | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

A job is just a role that cannot change | Harold Jarche

A job is just a role that cannot change | Harold Jarche | O_Berard | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Olivier Berard
Scoop.it!

Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure?

Is Collaboration Limited by Organizational Structure? | O_Berard | Scoop.it
We've been seeking enterprise 2.0 and social business for several years now with some notable success, but still quite a lot of “vague” and some level of fatigue. Topic: Social Business.
more...
No comment yet.