Nutrition in Schools
12 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Abby Moran from Nutrition News
Scoop.it!

National School Lunch Week aims to get kids excited about healthy choices

Laura Parker is responsible for making sure about 9,000 children in Etowah County Schools have healthy, tasty meals with plenty of choices each day.

Via Healthy Food Choices in Schools
Abby Moran's insight:

Etowah County Schools focus on healthy, tasty meals and the opportunity for students to pick from many choices each day. The cafeteria workers are trying to break free from the common stereotype that lunch room food isn't good. I thought back to my previous experiences involving school lunches and realized that this is a stereotype that I still hold. I tried a cafeteria meal in elementary school that I didn't particulalrly like and it has impacted me ever since. However, I'm glad that schools are ultimately working to change these stereotypes. Schools in the county focused on National School Lunch Week from Monday-Friday. Schools held events and activities all week in order to promote the importance of healthy breakfast and lunches. In addition, they promoted the various tastes and flavors from different cultures from various regions throughout the United States. I think it's important to introduce children to a wide variety of food in order for them to be well-rounded individuals. What I really liked about lunch foods in this county is that the student has choices. They are able to pick from a salad, sandwich or hot entree. All three choices include the side of vegetables and fruit. I think it's great to give students different choices. I know that from elementary school through high school, we were only offered one meal per day. If you didn't like the option that was provided, there were no other options. In addition, due to the way students pay for their lunches, parents are able to see what their children eat everyday. This provides parents with the opportunity to check up on their children in order to make sure they are maintaining healthy diets. I think it's great that schools are working hard to provide children with a variety of options, foods that they will enjoy and nutritious meals. Students are truly able to learn about the benefits of healthy eating through the process of attending and participating in school lunch. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

Study: Poor children are now the majority in American public schools in South, West

Study: Poor children are now the majority in American public schools in South, West | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
In 2011, almost half of the nation’s 50 million students qualified for free or reduced-price meals.
Abby Moran's insight:

When thinking about nutrition in schools, I think we sometimes ignore the idea of free or reduced meal prices. However, they are extremely important and impact a significant number of children. Prior to this summer, I was not aware of this concept. However, this summer,  I worked at a camp for underprivileged children and they received free breakast and free lunch everyday of camp for a month. I was new to this concept but realized the importance and effectiveness of it. This article opened my eyes to the extreme amount of students in the world that qualify for free or reduced meals. When I entered the school this summer, I was so confused as to why so many students were receiving free meals because I had never been introduced to it in the schools that I attended. Students whose parents can't afford enough food to feed them everyday of school really benefit from these meals. Without these meals, how would they eat? Would they be left hungry? What I think we need to focus on is the healthiness of these meals. Instead of giving students greasy and fatty foods, they should be introduced to healthier foods and should be provided with fruits and vegetables at most meals. I know from experience that continually being fed specific foods allows you to get used to these foods and eventually enjoy them. When I came to college, I didn't eat fruits or vegetables. However, since I had healthy roommates, I was introduced to a variety of fruits and vegetables that I had never eaten before. Now, I continue to eat and enjoy these foods. Since students are receving these meals for free, they will be grateful no matter what they are given. However, I do believe that nutrition should be discussed in schools and students should be able to witness the importance of healthy eating styles. If students are just taught about healthy eating styles but aren't actually introduced to them within their own cafeteria, the lesson won't be nearly as effective. Students should be introduced to these healthy foods at a young age so they can continue to maintain healthy eating habits throughout their lifetime. 

more...
Julie Newman's comment, December 10, 2013 7:25 PM
Similar to Abby, I was not aware of free or reduced priced meal plans within school until my placement this semester. While I understood what these meal plans meant, I never connected free or reduced meal plans with nutrition. As abby stated, this article really opened my eyes to the connection to these meal places and nutrition. This angers me because just because a student qualifies for a free or reduced price meal plan, does not mean they are any less deserving of a nutritious meal.
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

Empower Network - How important is nutrition in schools?

Empower Network - How important is nutrition in schools? | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
RT @MeetCasey: How important is nutrition in schools? http://t.co/yB9tyUOc1J #nutrition #schools #kidshealth #obesity #healthykids
Abby Moran's insight:

This short but to the point article talks about the exploration of school lunch programs and nutrition in schools. They focus on what schools are serving and where the food is actually coming from. I think this is extremely important because people usually ignore the idea of where food comes from, despite its significance. One of the cool parts of the study is that it focuses on "community garden projects" that are going on at some schools. This project requires students to actually grow their own plants and then they eventually eat what they grow. This concept was new to me and I would like to learn more about it! They also provide us with staggering statistics relating to obesity rates in America. It's evident that nutrition in schools needs to change. I know that when I was in school, the cafeteria provided students with pizza, nachos, chicken nuggets, burgers etc. While working at a camp this summer where students received free and reduced meals, the meals were promoted to be healthy but I didn't necessarily think that they could be considered healthy. Schools are attempting to change the diets of students but they need to think of different and influential ways to do so. For example, students would be served salad with crispy chicken tenders. Even though the salad is healthy, students took out the chicken tenders and only ate those. Similarly, when they were given carrots along with a burger, they ignored the carrots and ate the burger. This article made me realize that we really need to focus on the food that is served in school cafeterias. I think the idea of the community gardern projects is really significant and important. However, it's not prevalent in our society. If we want the nutrition in schools to improve, we need to think of new ways and solutions to do so. 

more...
Julie Newman's comment, December 10, 2013 7:29 PM
The one thing that stuck out to me about this article was its mention of community garden projects. Similar to Abby, this is a new concept to me and I would like not not only learn more about it, but I wonder how many schools across the country are partaking in this project. I think that being able to grow your own food is not only rewarding, but it also teaches students independence and responsibility for their own health. I think teaching children to grow their own food at such a young age is a great ideal to instill at an early age. I wish my elementary school incorporated a community garden!
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

Mary Berry: Children should be taught to cook a minimum of TEN meals at school

Mary Berry: Children should be taught to cook a minimum of TEN meals at school | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
Teachers should show young people how to make a selection of healthy, good value meals, the Great British Bake Off host, pictured, has said.
Abby Moran's insight:

I thought that this article was very interesting because I have never really thought about the importance of learning to cook in schools so students are able to take this knowledge home with them. Growing up, I was never really offered the option of taking a cooking class (besides 1 in high school that didn't fit into my schedule) so this article was very interesting to me. Mary Berry emphasizes the importance of bringing cooking back into the school system. Teachers should go back to showing young people what's good for them, how to buy food, and how to make certain dishes. She suggests the idea that children should leave school with the knowledge of how to cook 10 meals. Eventually, children will live on their own and have to cook for themselves so they need to learn how to do so in a healthy and cheap manner. I had never really thought about this but I now understand the benefits and think it is a logical idea. In high school, there was one cooking class that students could take but most students took it because it was considered an easy A. The students in the class fooled around and definitely didn't leave the class knowing how to cook 10 different meals. In today's society, I think that most schools focus on math, english, science etc. However, I do believe that it's esential to somehow incorporate classes that involve cooking and healthy eating habits. Subjects like math and science are very important but physical health is also extremely important and should be emphasized in schools. I took one health class in high school but it mainly focused on sexual health, not physical health and healthy eating habits. Cooking classes could truly introduce students to new dishes and new healthy eating habits.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

We Are Hungry - YouTube

Good news! The USDA will allow more meats and grains in school lunches following criticisms of parents and lawmakers. To all supporters of our video, thank y...
Abby Moran's insight:

This video is very exaggerated but its messages are extremely important.The beginning of the video focuses on the fact that active students require 2000-5000 calories a day. However, the school lunch policy mandates that all teens only receive 750-850 calories per lunch. This really struck me. I wasn't aware that school lunches had become so small and that they weren't filled with nutritious foods. Even though the video seems silly, it's clear that students are really trying to express the need for more nutritious food during the school day. The video displays students falling asleep in class, not paying attention and not being able to participate in after school sporting activities. Students need fuel from food in order to complete and fulfill these activties.The end of the video even displays students burning the policy to show their extreme attitudes towards it. What really impacted me was that the video was created by students. I feel that students don't typically have such strong opinions about nutrition in schools, so it's important to focus on the idea that this video was created by them. We tend to focus on what experts say about the importance of healthy foods in schools, but we never really focus on student opinions.What also really amazed me is that so many students came together to support a common goal or common ideal. This shows the true importance of learning to defend what you believe in and what you think is important in society. It's evident that nutrition in schools is an extremely large topic in society today but I believe it should be emphasized more. In order to produce healthy students, they need to be taught about the importance of nutrition and a balanced diet. I also believe that healthy nutrition in schools should be achieved by the work of the teachers and students together. It's clear that students have strong opinions and should be involved in this learning process. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

Nutrition News: Healthier diets possible - Stoughton Journal

Nutrition News: Healthier diets possible - Stoughton Journal | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
Nutrition News: Healthier diets possible
Stoughton Journal
...
Abby Moran's insight:

I enjoyed reading this article because it proved that students' diets can change for the better when they are educated about healthy eating habits.To evaluate students' diet quality, a team of researchers developed the CHANGE program (Creating Healthy, Active and Nurturing Growing-up Environments). The study aimed to prove that diet quality would improve when children were exposed to a healthier food environment. In my opinion, this is so important. Children are more willing to eat healthier if they are educated about eating healthy. If children aren't educated, they don't realize the importance of maintaining a healthy diet. In the end, the students consumed significantly more fruits and vegetables after exposure to the study. I believe that all schools should implement a healthy eating environment in order to improve the health and well-being of children in our society. By continually researching this topic, I have become aware that the reason students don't eat healthy is because they aren't educated how to do so.Therefore, our society needs to realize that it's essential to teach students these habits. There are many different healthy eating programs throughout the country and I believe every program ultimately impacts students in a positive manner. I really found it amazing that the students actually ate healtheir (more fruits and vegetables) after the study was completed. A simple program significantly impacted the children's diets. It's essential for students to learn healthy eating habits at an early age so they are able to maintain these healthy eating habits throughout the rest of their lives. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Abby Moran
Scoop.it!

Healthy living scheme shows big gains for kids ...

Healthy living scheme shows big gains for kids ... | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
Analysis of a healthy eating and activity programme first tested in Waikato primary schools shows the project is saving taxpayer money and improving children's lives.
Abby Moran's insight:

This article details the benefits of the program titled Project Energize. The project, tested in Waikato primary schools, contains "energizers" who train teachers and children healthy eating habits and introduce them to activity programs. Its success has been proven and the program has expanded. Researchers praise the program and say that it improves the lives of children, families and teachers. Notably, it improves the nutritional and physical environment of the school! This article really intrigued me because in my opinion, people usually talk about the need to have healthier foods in schools but no one really acts on it. I think if more people are educated about nutrition programs such as this one, they will be able to relalize and appreciate its benefits. I know that before I decided to focus on the topic of nutrition in schools, I had no idea about specific programs or classes that had been implemented. If the United States always talks about the prevalence of childhood obesity, we need to make sure that we actually focus on this topic in order for students to become healthier. Although it's not possible for every single school across the country to be tested and studied by researchers with such programs, these schools can learn from the successes of other schools and implement successful programs in their own schools. Children are targeted for being unhealthy eaters and not exercising, but how are children supposed to understand exercise and healthy eating habits if they are not taught them? Since children attend school to learn, i believe school is a great environment to introduce children to healthy eating habits and the importance of daily activity. In addition, the article emphasizes that the program improved the overall environment of the school. If programs such as this experience such great results, why aren't they implemented across the country? It's evident that all individuals want to be healthy and the first step to being healthy can start within the school system. 

more...
No comment yet.