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My Plate: The New Food Guide Musical

My Plate: The New Food Guide Musical. A Catholic School in Harlem Turns the USDA-MyPlate into a School Musical.

 

USDA Blog


Via Ron Wolford
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A funny little video about myplate and healthy eating!

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Nutrition- Food Labels
This site provides resources that pertain to how to read a nutrition label, common misconceptions, how to take a nutrition label and determine how it relates directly to your personal health and more! Start from the top of this site and venture down to continue to build upon what you learn in taking hold of your nutrition and buying power! Be informed and become responsible for your personal health!
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Rescooped by Sarah Westaway from Successful Aging: Healthy, Vibrant, Engaged, Independent
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USDA's MyPlate - Home page

USDA's MyPlate - Home page | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
ChooseMyPlate.gov is the home page for the USDA's MyPlate -- the federal government's nutrition education and guidance.

Via Ken Charvoz
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Look at the myplate website and make sure that you understand about the different nutrients that you should be consuming. Navigate through this website and get introduced with the different resources available.

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Ashley Oliver's curator insight, November 9, 2013 5:19 PM

This website is a very good resource to use to track your meals. This allows you to see how much of each nutritient you are taking in while providing tips and ways to eat healthier. 

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Nutritional Needs and New Nutrition Labels: Kid' Games, Lesson Plans, and Curricular Activities

Nutritional Needs and New Nutrition Labels: Kid' Games, Lesson Plans, and Curricular Activities | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

Nutrition Facts and Fictions Revealed...What this means for parents...and AWESOME websites and games along with easy life suggestions.

 

 


Via Meryl Jaffe, PhD
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Take a look at this website and the immense amount of resources and alternative links that are available. Although this site is geared towards younger students, it does have the basics about nutrition that can help a person at any age!

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Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, July 23, 2013 2:17 PM
Thank you, Sarah, for the visit and rescoop.
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Nutrition Facts: An interactive guide to food labels - MayoClinic.com

Nutrition Facts: An interactive guide to food labels - MayoClinic.com | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
Use this interactive guide to decipher the Nutrition Facts label and break the code on healthy eating.

Via Sandi Cornez
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Look at this article and more on this great website!!!

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Sandi Cornez's curator insight, April 27, 2013 12:39 PM

I found this interactive guide useful. It gives a better understanding of what to include and what to limit. Very good tool for people who may be confused by all the differing comments about healthy food.

Rescooped by Sarah Westaway from Foods4BetterHealth
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5 Things You Need to Know About Nutrition Labels - Foods4BetterHealth

5 Things You Need to Know About Nutrition Labels - Foods4BetterHealth | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

Via Aidan Bertie
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What 5 things should you know about a food label!

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(EN) - Food Glossary | strongertogether.coop

(EN) - Food Glossary | strongertogether.coop | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
What's the difference between free-range and grass-fed? Here's some clarity on common food labels and terms. (The difference between free-range, organic, grass-fed, and more. @StrongerTogether provides a food glossary.

Via Stefano KaliFire
Sarah Westaway's insight:

A great food glossary to help ensure that you understand the ligo of food labels! For example, what does free-range actually mean?

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Rescooped by Sarah Westaway from Nutrition Today
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8 ingredients you never want to see on nutrition labels

8 ingredients you never want to see on nutrition labels | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
By David Zinczenko, with Matt GouldingMen's Health
The year was 1950, and The Magic 8-Ball had just arrived in stores. It looked like a toy, but it wasn't.

Via Demarcio Washington
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What ingredients on food labels should not be consumed!

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Rescooped by Sarah Westaway from Healthy Lifestyle PR
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Think outside the box ... Literally

Think outside the box ...  Literally | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

Even though it appears there are more “health” foods available to us than ever before, individuals across this country seem to be battling weight gain and chronic disease as much or more than in past years. Reports indicate the problem behind these “healthy” foods is that many of them are processed and in a box. Even though they are categorized as organic, enriched, or natural, they do not necessarily offer the nutrients our bodies need on a daily basis. In other words, consumers must begin to get away from “the box!” In order to maintain a healthy lifestyle, they should focus on eating whole, fresh, and unprocessed foods and try to stay away from prepackaged products while preparing the bulk of their meals at home. It is suggested that consumers start small; focus on one meal rather than the entire week. Do research by reading health food magazines and healthy recipes online. In addition, individuals should allow themselves time off in that 90 percent of the time they prepare their own foods at home, and 10 percent of the time they splurge and eat out.

 

This is a topic that certainly hit home with me as I am very careful about the foods I eat. I consciously made the decision to eat “healthy” foods several years ago and focus on eating only those items considered to be organic and natural. I found myself attracted to items that were labeled with the words such as “all natural,”  “organic,” and “enriched” in bold letters across their packages. In the beginning, I did not take the time to closely read their nutrition labels as I fell into the hype they must be what I was looking for as the package said so! I did exactly what advertisers wanted consumers to do; I acted on impulse and bought the product because of one or two words slapped across the front of the packaging, television commercials, and even flyers announcing the arrival of such products at my nearby grocery store. I even paid more for some of these items! Restaurants even advertise that they use these same “natural” products while preparing some of their new and improved healthier items on their menus. No doubt, the companies that produce these foods have listened to marketing executives and public relations teams working on ad campaigns which have suggested they use the types of food labels as listed above to get the consumer’s attention. Teamwork was needed to reach the public and probably included company executives, buyers, accountants, and CEOs headed by a great public relations team all focused on getting the consumer to buy the product. As noted in Adventures in Public Relations by Guth and Marsh, a 2004 survey of business- to-business communicators noted that their “top goal was driving sales followed by customer acquisition” (p. 192). This is definitely the final goal of the many companies offering these organic and natural products. They want to increase their sales and hopefully acquire new customers who will remain loyal for years to come. While it appears to be quite successful for the companies involved, the general public might want to take a closer look at nutrition labels rather than just the “large print.”


Via Matthew Dye
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Interesting article about what one thinks and what is actually the reality. Read this article and critically think about what you consume or would like to in the near future. Make changes to your diet if necessary to become a healthier person!

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Consumers don't pay as much attention to nutrition fact labels as they think, eye-tracking study finds

Consumers don't pay as much attention to nutrition fact labels as they think, eye-tracking study finds | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
Are Nutrition Facts labels read in detail by consumers when making purchases? Do people read only certain portions of the labels?

Via k3hamilton
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Reading labels impacts health! 

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Reading Food Labels Helps to Lose Weight

A study in Agricultural Economics found that people who read food labels, especially women, tend to weigh less than those who don't....


Via David Holloway
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Being able to read and understand nutrition labels enables you to realize what you are putting into your body. Be empowered and this can have a positive result.

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How Do You Know What Food Labels Mean and Whether They're ...

How Do You Know What Food Labels Mean and Whether They're ... | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
It may come as a surprise to some, but buying foods labeled cage-free or grass-fed does not necessarily mean that those items are what they say they are, or what we assume they mean. This can be really frustrating if you are ...
Sarah Westaway's insight:

There is an abundance of information that is placed on food labels, as well as some information that is not placed on food labels. As a consumer it is important to be aware of the food we are consuming. Being informed and critical of what these labels are actually telling us is imperative. For example, what does organic or grass-feed actually mean and what regulations allows an individual to claim these standards. Be sure to click the three links provided at the end of the article to be able to see of different food certifications. 

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MyPlate Recipes (MyPlateRecipes)

MyPlate Recipes (MyPlateRecipes) | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
MyPlate Recipes is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you. (Did you know the USDA's MyPlate program has a Pinterest board with tons of healthy recipes?

Via Steven Redhead
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Pinterest can be used for a variety of resources. Visit this pinterest wall and discover a variety of healthy options! Try something new now that you understand how to read labels and can choose healthy options for your personal health!

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Ashley Oliver's curator insight, November 9, 2013 5:17 PM

This website provides many healthy recipies. There are recipies for each of the food groups as well as healthy recipies for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

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My Plate: The New Food Guide Musical

My Plate: The New Food Guide Musical. A Catholic School in Harlem Turns the USDA-MyPlate into a School Musical.

 

USDA Blog


Via Ron Wolford
Sarah Westaway's insight:

A funny little video about myplate and healthy eating!

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How to Read a Food Label - Video - Oprah.com

How to Read a Food Label - Video - Oprah.com | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
Dr. Oz demonstrates the right way to read the nutrition information on food labels.
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Don't feel like reading, watch this video to learn about how to read a nutrition label!

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Reading Food Nutrition Labels

Reading Food Nutrition Labels | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

Decoding food nutrition labels can be tough. Here are some tools that can help.


Via Cori Busby
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Read it right! This site has a ton of great information on a nutrition label!

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How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label

The following label-building skills are intended to make it easier for you to use nutrition labels to make quick, informed food choices that contribute to a healthy diet.

Via Sarah Betack
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When you originally navigate to the site it will say page not found, but press on the link provided- How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label- and you will be brought to the site. Make sure to look at this site! It is an exclusive look at how to read a nutrition label and has informative facts and figures to help you understand!

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HEALTHbeat: 5 tips for decoding food labels

HEALTHbeat: 5 tips for decoding food labels | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

Food labels, healthy snacks and more on eating from Harvard Med.


Via Ray and Terry's
Sarah Westaway's insight:

5 great tips for reading food labels while grocery shopping! Be sure to know what you are purchasing and putting into your body!

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How to Read a Nutrition Label - The Daily Meal

How to Read a Nutrition Label - The Daily Meal | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
How to Read a Nutrition Label
The Daily Meal
Nutrition labels contain dietary information that can affect your short-term and long-term health.

Via Angie Mc
Sarah Westaway's insight:

This site has a slide show and information to help you understand how to correctly read a nutrition label. Make sure you navigate to the various links where you can find information regarding specific categories of food (e.g. dairy). Also, check out some great ideas for quick healthy meals.

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Rescooped by Sarah Westaway from Health and Wellness Trends
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Do 'light' and 'low-fat' nutrition labels actually mean healthier foods?

Do 'light' and 'low-fat' nutrition labels actually mean healthier foods? | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
Statements that a product is ‘light’ or ‘low fat’ can give consumers the illusion of healthy eating...

 

We've all been standing in the cookie aisle trying to decide whether to buy the regular cookies or those labeled "light." A common label now seen on all types of food products, this term has actually been regulated for use on special foods by federal rule. It can be applied to foods that have 25% fewer calories than those that they're being compared to, but can also be used on foods that are "light' in color or taste.

 

Research has found that consumers who try to make a healtheir choice by buying these foods labeled "light" actually end up consuming more calories, perhaps because they're compensating for the positive effect that lower calorie foods should have in theory.

 

Another downfall of "light" products is that while "bad" stuff is being taken out, such as fat, it's being replaced with sugars, salt, or other unnatural ingredients such as artificial thickeners or flavors. 

 

The bottom line is that it may be best for consumers to steer clear of foods that have substantial health claims on the packaging. If a food is truly healthy, it wouldn't need a label!


Via Melissa Rutzen
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Very interesting article! Be sure to read and think about what you choose and why! 

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The Truth Behind Calorie Labels

An OpDoc for the New York Times. Original posting and statement here; http://nyti.ms/WHJFPY Special Thank You to Dr. Rising, Ping and Dr. Pi-Sunyer as well a...
Sarah Westaway's insight:

This is a very interesting video that truly makes you think. Are the calories on labels actually accurate? Watch it!

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People who read food labels stay thinner, study finds

An international team of scientists headed from the University of Santiago de Compostela has found that reading the labels on food products is linked to obesity prevention, especially in women. According to the study which used data from the United States, female consumers who consult food labels weigh nearly 4 kilograms less.Along with the Universities of Tennessee, Arkansas (USA) and the Norwegian Institute for Agricultural Finance Research, the University of Santiago de Compostela has participated in a study on the relationship between reading the food label and obesity.

 

The results indicated that the body mass index of those consumers who read that label is 1.49 points lower than those who never consider such information when doing their food shopping. This translates as a reduction of 3.91 kg for an American woman measuring 1.62 cm and weighing 74 kg.

The data was taken from the annual National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) performed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC -- http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm). Some 25,640 observations were collected on health and eating and shopping habits. These included various questions on whether participants read the nutritional information in supermarkets and how often.


Via Ashish Umre
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Reading labels has shown to have a link with obesity prevention!

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, July 27, 2013 1:17 PM

One can argue about the "cause and effect" relationship here - but what really counts is the result, doesn't it?

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, September 12, 2013 8:49 PM

We can and should have a debate about the "cause and effect" relationship here - but what really counts is the result, doesn't it?

Jamie Robins's curator insight, March 10, 3:32 AM

Is this true of all readers of labels or is there a marketing angle associated with these claims?

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Food packaging 'traffic lights' to signal healthy choices on salt, fat and sugar

Food packaging 'traffic lights' to signal healthy choices on salt, fat and sugar | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it
Supermarkets and some food producers agree to nutritional labels but critics call for refuseniks 'to be named and shamed'

Via britishroses
Sarah Westaway's insight:

It is always good to know what is going on around you! Learn about new food packaging! New innovative ways to aid buyers purchasing and realization of their consumption.

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» Study Supports Importance of Food Labels for a Healthy Diet - Psych Central News

» Study Supports Importance of Food Labels for a Healthy Diet - Psych Central News | Nutrition- Food Labels | Scoop.it

...A new international study finds reading the labels on food products is linked to obesity prevention, especially in women.

 

Researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela, the Norwegian Institute for Agricultural Finance Research and the Universities of Tennessee and Arkansas found that female consumers who review food labels weigh nearly 9 pounds (4 kilograms) less than women who do not read the labels.


Via Carlton Jackson
Sarah Westaway's insight:

Reading labels to be aware and stay healthy! Obesity is an epidemic that needs to be curved and studies prove that reading labels can help reduce obesity and promote health!

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