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Nutrition Dos and Don'ts
A healthy diet is a cornerstone of good health. Find out what to eat, what not to eat, and what to avoid like the plague!
Curated by askdrmaxwell
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Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Ingestion of Energy Drinks

Adverse Cardiovascular Events After Ingestion of Energy Drinks | Nutrition Dos and Don'ts | Scoop.it

Energy drink (ED) consumption has been linked to several adverse event reports, but there is limited data on related cardiovascular (CV) complications.. We searched case reports in peer-reviewed journals from 1980, to 2013, in which an acute CV event was associated temporally with ED consumption.

We identified 14 eligible articles involving 15 cases (5 atrial arrhythmias, 5 ventricular arrhythmias, 1 QT prolongation, 4 ST-segment elevations). Two additional cases of cardiac arrest from our institution are included. Of these 17 cases of ED-related acute CV events (13 male cases; 15 cases aged <30 years, age range 13 to 58 years), only 1 had minor previous cardiac disease. Cardiac investigations did not reveal any predisposing cardiac abnormality in the majority of cases. Of the 11 cases related to a serious event (i.e., cardiac arrest, ventricular arrhythmia, or ST-segment elevations), 5 reported acute heavy ED consumption, 4 reported co-ingestions with alcohol or other drugs, and 2 were found to have a channelopathy. Potential mechanisms of ED-related cardiac events are reviewed. In conclusion, several adverse CV events after consuming ED have been reported in the literature. Although causality cannot be inferred from our series, physicians should routinely inquire about ED consumption in relevant cases, and vulnerable consumers such as youth should be advised that caution is warranted with heavy consumption and/or with concomitant alcohol or drug ingestion.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
askdrmaxwell's insight:

Energy drinks are not good for your health. They contain excessive amounts of caffeine and potentially-harmful additives and preservatives. 

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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:06 PM

The ingredients in energy drinks present theoretical risk for arrhythmia's.  The risk, however is not born out by this report based on the few cases (17 cases) presented in the literature.  This may be related to poor reporting by clinicians, of events which have a possible or probable linkage to energy drink use, 

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Addicted to ... Food?

Addicted to ... Food? | Nutrition Dos and Don'ts | Scoop.it

A study of 12 men found that glycemic load—distinct from calories or sweetness—can alter brain function and promote overeating. Is there such a thing as food addiction? A study using brain imaging suggests that high-glycemic foods may trigger the same brain mechanism as substance abuse.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD, Demarcio Washington
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, July 8, 2013 12:53 PM

The benefit of the diets which reduce sugar and carbohydrates such as Glycemic Index, Atkins, South Beach, Belly Fat Cure are in part due to the reduced sugar effect on the brain.

From the article: 

This study narrows the difference to one variable only—the glycemic load—and indicates that this factor, distinct from calories or sweetness, can alter brain function and promote overeating. “These findings suggest that limiting high-glycemic index carbohydrates like white bread and potatoes could help obese individuals reduce cravings and control the urge to overeat,

RISE - The Multi-Media Magazine's curator insight, July 22, 2013 9:35 AM

Read more like this at http://on.fb.me/16FKXNW

shelbylaneMD's curator insight, August 18, 2013 11:53 AM

Addiction and dopamine.  "these foods contain chemical compounds that stimulate the brain's secretion of opiate-like, "feel-good" chemicals like dopamine, which drive our cravings for them....."

Rescooped by askdrmaxwell from Nutrition Today
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Eating healthy is cheaper than you think.

Eating healthy is cheaper than you think. | Nutrition Dos and Don'ts | Scoop.it

Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) crunched the numbers and it’s official: the healthiest diets cost just $1.50 more than unhealthy diets.

 While cost is an issue in when it comes to adding more fresh produce and leaner meats such as fish in your daily diet, few studies have actually evaluated how much more expensive a healthier diet might be. An analysis of 27 studies from 10 higher income countries that compared price points for healthy and less healthy diets. The price differences per serving and per 200 calories for a variety of specific foods, as well as prices per day and per 2,000 calories, which is the average daily recommended caloric intake for U.S. adults.

The results confirm that healthier fare, like fruits, veggies and fish are more expensive than unhealthy foods like processed meals and snacks and refined grains.  However, swapping out some of these less expensive, and less healthy foods, for fresher and more nutritious ones added up to only about $1.50 more per day.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD, Demarcio Washington
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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, December 6, 2013 6:03 PM

The cost, convenience and accessibility of fast food outlets like McDonald's & KFC challenges healthy eating. In my neighborhood, McDonald's offers the family combo (2 Big Macs, 2 McChickens, 4 small fries, 4 small sodas) for $9.99.  KFC has rolled out its $10 Weekend Bucket that offers 10 pieces of chicken for $10.
The value of this research from HSPH is that we can teach that the cost is not an impediment to healthy eating for most Americans.  Fast food accessibility and ease of use is still something that requires education: it's easier to buy a meal at a drive through window than it is to make a salad.
Like most healthy life strategies including exercise and diet - the healthy way is not the easier way.

Donovan Baldwin's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:12 PM

Why skimp when it comes to good health. You'll wind up paying more in the long run.

Veronika Bujok's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:08 AM

people have taste, not have the time and willingness, but cooking is fun and live healthy is an art