Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature
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Permanent Weight Loss for 2014: Customizing Your Diet - Yahoo Health

Permanent Weight Loss for 2014: Customizing Your Diet - Yahoo Health | Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature | Scoop.it
Permanent Weight Loss for 2014: Customizing Your Diet
Yahoo Health
Thanks to cutting-edge research, there may be some new clues as to why and how some people are successful at maintaining sustained weight loss and some are not.
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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 14, 2014 11:02 AM
Some people have an easier time at keeping off weight than others. Is there a reason for that? Research shows that the answer has to do with our metabolism, our individual genetics, and the microorganisms located in our gut. Dr. Christopher Gardener, from the Stanford Prevention Research Center located in California, has researched this subject, and has concluded that there is a reason that people who use weight-loss programs such as Zone, Ornish, and Atkins may be unsuccessful at keeping the weight off. It is because that weight-loss strategy may not match their unique "genetic and metabolic profile."
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Eating plant foods may help ward off chronic diseases - Newstrack India

Eating plant foods may help ward off chronic diseases - Newstrack India | Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature | Scoop.it
Eating plant foods may help ward off chronic diseasesNewstrack IndiaIn the October issue of Food Technology magazine, Senior Writer/Editor Toni Tarver cited recent discoveries in nutritional genomics that explain how plant-based diets are effective...

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 20, 2014 2:04 PM
Toni Carver wrote about nutrigenomics in the Food Technology Magazine that was distributed in October. In his piece, he wrote that "the antioxidants in plant foods counter free radicals that can cause chronic inflammation and damage cells." Other substances in fruits and vegetables helps regulate a gene connected to heart disease and, a gene connected to plaque accumulation in the arteries, and other genes/cellular elements that create and maintain tumors. Foods such as artichokes, cinnamon, black pepper, garlic, olives, rosemary, pumpkin, lentils, watercress, and thyme can possibly help restrain the growth of cancer in the body.
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Nutritional genomics. [Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet. 2004] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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Nutritional Genomics

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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 20, 2014 2:22 PM
Nutritional genomics will supply the foundation of giving proper nutrition for an individual's genetic needs. Nutrigenomics has already been providing assistance for diseases that are only controlled by one pair of genes, but what scientists and researchers want to do is use it to prevent "multifactorial disorders," and they want to find ways to look into one's genetics, find signs of a future disorder, and prevent it from occuring in one's body using personalized nutrition. The beginning of using personalized nutrition to cure/prevent heart diseases and cancer have given encouraging results, but overall uncertain as to whether it will be 100% successful. In order for there to be success, people will need to perform experiments/studies on large groups of people in order to figure out how their genes react to their environment. Currently, there may be some problems with the study, but data indicates that the study will one day be successful, and that the foundation of the success will be nutrition.
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A diet chart dictated by your genes - Financial Express

A diet chart dictated by your genes - Financial Express | Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature | Scoop.it
Financial Express A diet chart dictated by your genes Financial Express Nutritional genomics or nutrigenomics is the study of how different foods can interact with particular genes to alter a person's risk of developing diseases and how individual...
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Nutrigenomics

RELATING NUTRITION AND HEALTH AND GENES Nutrigenomics is the science that examines the response of individuals to food compounds using post-genomic and relat...
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The Chronic Disease Food Remedy - IFT.org

The Chronic Disease Food Remedy - IFT.org | Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature | Scoop.it
Cures for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and obesity have eluded scientists for decades, but research in nutritional genomics suggests that halting the progression of these diseases may be as simple as a dietary intervention.

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 17, 2014 12:38 PM
Hippocrates, a Greek doctor, had believed that there was a connection between our health and the foods we eat. One would think that we as a people agree, since we advocate health, and give consumers ways to a healthier lifestyle. Instead, foods that are popular today contain unhealthy ingredients, such as unsaturated fats and added sugars, and lack the better ingredients, like fiber and plant-based foods. Because we eat like this, we are more likely to possibly get chronic diseases, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Due to our diets, "noncummunicable chronic diseases are the leading causes of death in the world." These diseases, which can be prevented with a better diet, killed 63% of people around the world in 2008.
Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 17, 2014 2:02 PM
Some people groups do not eat the popular, unhealthy foods of today, and as a result, mostly avoid getting the noncommunicable chronic diseases altogether. These people groups eat foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Research has proven that plant-based foods contain more nutrients than any other food in the world. Research has also proven that there is "an inverse relationship between a high consumption of plant foods and chronic diseases." But why? Plant foods are composed of substances that positively affect your body. A few of these substances are antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, and in our bodies, they "interact with cells, enzymes, hormones, and DNA, playing a role in controlling gene expression and cell changes that lead to chronic disease." Our genes can benefit or be harmed from the foods we eat, because they can change based on what we put into our bodies.
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Nutritional Genomics - Terms you want to know

http://www.meg-enterprises.com/classes/nutrigenomics-101 For wellness professionals who are interested in the role genetics plays in health. Learn the termin...
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The genes of dieting - The Star Online

The genes of dieting - The Star Online | Customizing One's Diet to Their Genetic Signature | Scoop.it
The genes of dieting
The Star Online
As nutritional genomics (or nutrigenomics) becomes even more advanced, we may eventually be able to tailor dietetic advice to every individual based on his/her genetic profile.

Via Ana Triggs
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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 18, 2014 12:37 PM
Why do some people have an easier time losing weight and other people struggle with it? A lot of that may have to do with our individual genes. There are many ways of dieting, but a different, seemingly more helpful way of dieting is becoming more well known. Is is called genetic profiling. Not only can it help dieting, but research in nutrigenomics has also shown that it can possibly foretell what chronic diseases an individual may be more likely to get. One person may be more likely to get one disease than someone else because of possible genetic mutations that have occurred in their body. Fortunately, genetic profiling can help possibly prevent these chronic diseases by giving instruction on how to change one's eating and living habits.
Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 18, 2014 1:51 PM
nutrigenomics has changed the way people see weight loss. If nutrition and genomics are looked at together, they can answer questions about the unique responses from foods that individuals have based on the genes in their body. In the future, nutritional genomics may be able to give individuals customized advice on their diet based on their indivual genes. There have been instances that prove how this could work. A dietitian in Austrailia used genetic profiling with two of her patients, and found that one of them needed a low-carb diet to lose weight because carbohydrates didn't sit well with her body genetically. Also, research has revealed that people who are genetically struggling with obesity will struggle even more if they drink sodas with lots of sugar in it.
Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 18, 2014 2:06 PM
genes that influence obesity in people interact with the brain, causing people who struggle with obesity to think they are hungrier than they really are. These genes do not interact with that person's metabolism. Also, each brain of each person may have a unique influence on macronutrients put into the body. This shows that different people react in different ways to macronutrients. People who's genetics cause them to struggle with obesity should pay attention to these findings, because if they stay away from certain foods that their brain sends false messages about(eat more of that) and eat more of others that will satisfy them, they may not have to struggle with obesity any longer. Although the main way to lose weight is to eat less and excercise more, nutrigenomics can help you eat more suitably for what your body needs to lose weight while you excercise.
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Nutrigenomics: Screening DNA to determine genetic flaws and treating with dietary supplement

RicherLifeNow.com or DianaFrerick@aol.com. Imagine customizing your Isagenix program according your own DNA. The science behind this is called Nutrigenomics....
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Home - Nutritional Genomics

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Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 13, 2014 2:14 PM
Nutritional genomics is the relationship between the foods we eat and our genetics, and the effects that each together can have on our overall health. It explains how what we eat can impact our genes functions, and how our genetics determine what foods we need or don't need to eat. Nutrigenomics has lately become more popular due to it's possibilities of defending against chronic diseases and keeping them out of our bodies. Just by making a few positive changes to our diets, we could possibly get rid of cancers and other diseases from making a home in our bodies.
Sabbath Woodrow's comment, February 19, 2014 8:25 PM
There are five concepts that apply to nutritional genomics. One is that depending on each individuals' genetics and situation, what they eat can greatly affect their likeliness to develop certain diseases. The second is that nutritional substances can, in one way or another, change the way one's genes show themselves or are arranged. The third concept is that one's diet can positively or negatively affect one's health, but the level of the effect depends on each person's individual genetic profile. The fourth concept is that genes controlled by one's diet can influence a disease in many ways: it's occurrence in one's system, how it affects one's body, or if one's diet heals the body from the disease altogether. The final concept is that combining information about one's nutritional needs, how healthy and individual is, and nutrigenomics can help cure, lessen, or keep chronic diseases from out of people's bodies.