Nutrition
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Telehealth Can Give Patients Better Care | Support Solutions

Telehealth Can Give Patients Better Care | Support Solutions | Nutrition | Scoop.it
Telehealth is more likely to achieve better and faster health outcomes, and gives patients more responsibility over their health.

Via Telemedicine Today
Encompass HealthCare's insight:

Telehealth and telemedicine are hot topics and they are creating quite a stir.  Telehealth is the delivery of health-related services and information via telecommunications technologies. Telehealth could be as simple as two health professionals discussing a case over a video chat or as sophisticated as doing robotic surgery between facilities at different ends of the globe.


What are the implications of telemedicine? In some cases, the ability to send images quickly over the internet sidesteps the time-lag that older technological modes presented. Waiting for a fax can now seem eternal as compared to one physician emailing a report or Face-timing in order to discuss a patient's case.


Is it all beneficial, however? Time may be saved, but patient-to-patient contact may be lost, as some physician's offices are, for instance, entertaining "office visits" via Face-time, Skype, and other video chat services. And this is just the beginning.


To what lengths is telemedicine beneficial? And who gets to weigh in on this? Each patient? Or just the doctors running the offices?  And what, if any, protocol will become the standard of patient treatment?


These questions knock on the already-fragile door of compromised service across most industries, especially in healthcare. In a field where patients are sick, vulnerable, and often scared, what is needed is more patient-centered focus. More handholding. 


This issue begs the question of balance.  How much technology is the "right" amount, as to not compromise patient care? How far is too far? These questions have yet to be answered.


What do you think? Respond by clicking "reply" and feel free to share this.


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Encompass HealthCare's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:06 PM

Telehealth and telemedicine are hot topics and they are creating quite a stir.  Telehealth is the delivery of health-related services and information via telecommunications technologies. Telehealth could be as simple as two health professionals discussing a case over a video chat or as sophisticated as doing robotic surgery between facilities at different ends of the globe.


What are the implications of telemedicine? In some cases, the ability to send images quickly over the internet sidesteps the time-lag that older technological modes presented. Waiting for a fax can now seem eternal as compared to one physician emailing a report or Face-timing in order to discuss a patient's case.


Is it all beneficial, however? Time may be saved, but patient-to-patient contact may be lost, as some physician's offices are, for instance, entertaining "office visits" via Face-time, Skype, and other video chat services. And this is just the beginning.


To what lengths is telemedicine beneficial? And who gets to weigh in on this? Each patient? Or just the doctors running the offices?  And what, if any, protocol will become the standard of patient treatment?


These questions knock on the already-fragile door of compromised service across most industries, especially in healthcare. In a field where patients are sick, vulnerable, and often scared, what is needed is more patient-centered focus. More handholding. 


This issue begs the question of balance.  How much technology is the "right" amount, as to not compromise patient care? How far is too far? These questions have yet to be answered.


What do you think? Respond by clicking "reply" and feel free to share this.

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Safely Succumb to Chocolate - KORR Medical Technologies

Safely Succumb to Chocolate - KORR Medical Technologies | Nutrition | Scoop.it
It’s February, and everyone knows that this is the month of cards, flowers and… chocolate! That divine delight which can also be the dieter’s most dire enemy. But do not fear! Simple moderation can help you indulge in that chocolaty temptation while staying within your target calorie count! Here are six suggestions to help you safely succumb to your chocolate craving! [...]
Encompass HealthCare's insight:

Okay...we all have our cravings and for some of us it's chocolate. With Valentine's Day right around the corner, that could be hard to resist. But should we?

The key to a healthy diet is moderation. This means including a variety of food groups in your diet, including different foods within these groups and allowing yourself the occasional treat. By indulging once in a while in a portion-controlled way, we allow our bodies and our brains to be satisfied. 
We also allow ourselves the freedom to avoid "yo-yo" dieting. Rather than overindulging because we usually deprive ourselves and then restricting our food intake as a result, (and then repeating this awful pattern,) we are able to avoid games with food and just enjoy eating for the right reasons. 
Nourishing your body is one of the best things that you can do for yourself. It's what makes everything works. And who shouldn't enjoy a tasty treat once in a while? A few pieces of candy won't collapse the whole house of cards. It may even show you that the word "moderation" is surprisingly within your reach. You really don't have to (and probably don't want to) eat the entire box of chocolates.
So go ahead, this Valentine's Day. Enjoy your treat. And enjoy yourself!
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Rescooped by Encompass HealthCare from Plant-Based News
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New to the world of fermented foods? Learn about the benefits of these foods in...

New to the world of fermented foods? Learn about the benefits of these foods in your diet, how they effective they are at supporting digestion and immunity, and overall wellness and disease-resistance.


Via Jolly Green Jane
Encompass HealthCare's insight:

We all know that nutrition is critical for wound healing.  Beyond the foods that we eat, however, is how we process these foods. Fermentation is an amazing process that can aid in digestion and produce nutritional benefits.  


Why are fermented foods good for you?  First, let's talk about what fermented foods are:  fermented foods are starches in basic foods that are broken down and changed by microorganisms like bacteria, molds and yeasts into tinier, often times more digestible foods (courtesy of BioGirl Health.)  This results in "friendly" microorganisms that promote intestinal health.


What makes this beneficial?  Fermentation aids hard-to-digest foods in addition to a number of other nutritional benefits listed below.  


7 Reasons to Eat Fermented Foods


1. Fermented foods improve digestion. How?

Fermenting our foods before we eat them is like partially digesting them before we consume them. According to Joanne Slavin, a professor in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota, “…sometimes people who cannot tolerate milk can eat yogurt. That’s because the lactose (which is usually the part people can’t tolerate) in milk is broken down as the milk is fermented and turns into yogurt.”

2. Fermented foods restore the proper balance of bacteria in the gut.

Do you suffer from lactose intolerance? Gluten intolerance? Constipation? Irritable bowel syndrome? Yeast infections? Allergies? Asthma? All of these conditions have been linked to a lack of good bacteria in the gut.

3. Raw, fermented foods are rich in enzymes.

Your body needs enzymes to adequately digest, absorb, and utilize the nutrients in your food. As you age, your body’s supply of enzymes decreases.

4. Fermenting food actually increases the vitamin content.

Fermented dairy products show an increased level of folic acid which, for example, is critical to producing healthy babies. 


5. Eating fermented food helps us to absorb the nutrients we’re consuming.


You can ingest huge amounts of nutrients, but unless you actually absorb them, they’re useless.  When you improve digestion, you improve absorption.

6. Fermenting food helps to preserve it for longer periods of time.

Milk will sour in the refrigerator but kefir and yogurt last much longer. Sauerkraut, pickles and salsa will keep for months.


7. Fermenting food is inexpensive--you can do it yourself!


There’s nothing fancy required for this hobby. And many of the foods required to make these recipes are very inexpensive.  For instance, cabbage can be used to make sauerkraut and tomatoes can be used to make salsa.  See recipe below to get started!

Fermented SalsaIngredients

1-2 Chili peppers 
4 Medium fresh tomatoes 
1 Medium white or yellow onion
2 Garlic cloves 
3 Lemons or 3 limes
2 T Sea salt 

1 bunch cilantro

Mason jar


1. Wearing rubber gloves, cut open the chiles and discard the stems and seeds. Set aside.

2. Peel and deseed tomatoes.  Fill a large saucepan halfway with water, set on high heat and bring to a boil. Carefully set tomatoes in saucepan and let sit for 5-10 seconds and then remove with a slotted spoon or tongs. Cool and peel. Cut tomatoes in half and gently squeeze out the seeds, or scoop out with a spoon, and discard. Set aside.

3. Peel and quarter the onion and peel and smash or crush the garlic.

4.  Rinse, dry and chop cilantro.  

5. Place the peppers, tomatoes, onion, garlic, and the cilantro into a food processor.

6. Squeeze the 2 lemons or 3 limes, add the juice and add the sea salt.

7. Pulse several times and transfer to quart-sized mason jar. Add a little water if necessary, making sure to leave at least an inch of space from the top of the jar.

8. Cover and keep at room temperature for 2-3 days before transferring to the fridge. Salsa will keep for weeks or months in fridge.


Happy fermenting!  

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