Food in Schools
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Just Released – National Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in Schools

Just Released – National Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in Schools | Food in Schools | Scoop.it
Today marks a milestone for the food allergy community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published “Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies In Schools and Early Car...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

This website showcases the new guideline by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention called the “Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies In Schools and Early Care and Education Programs.” This guide was established under the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Management Act in 2011. This document informs about the physical and emotional health of children with food allergies. This is the first comprehensive national guideline for school food allergy management.

 

I chose to scoop this topic on allergies due to a recent event while mentoring a fourth grader. One of my mentees told me she was allergic to peanuts after I gave her the snack of day, a peanut granola bar. I was surprised my program did not do a background check on allergies.

I also remembered some EDCI280 students mentioning different allergy rules at their different schools. I was not aware of any universal guidelines for allergies in public schools. Therefore, I found it very interesting that the first universal guideline is only a couple years old.

In almost every grade, at least one student has a severe allergy. As future teachers, I believe it is important for us to know how to “reduce allergic reactions, improve response to life-threatening reactions and ensure current policies are in line with laws that protect children with serious health issues.” At this point, I do not believe there was any training for this at my EDCI280 school. Since this is just a universal guideline, all schools do not need to abide by it. However, I think it should be required for teachers to learn about severe allergic reactions as a health precaution. For example, training to use an epipen was taught to my ninth grade health class. This simple procedure could easily be taught to teachers and students at an elementary level. Overall, I believe students with allergies should be welcomed and feel safe in the classroom. In order to guarantee this, teachers should read guidelines on managing food allergies in the classroom. 

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Allergy Partners of North Texas 's curator insight, January 9, 2014 7:07 PM

This is good news for students with food allergies. Raising awareness. 

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Uproar Over School Lunches

Students launched a YouTube-fueled rebellion against the new government healthy meal guidelines.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This news video reflects on the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010. While this act aimed to increase nutrition in school lunches, the amount of waste has actually doubled. Therefore, students are eating less. This news story investigates what food items are being thrown away. Many unopened fruit items and vegetables were in the trash. Officials hope that by naming carrots as “X-Ray Vision Carrots” high students will be more prone to eat their vegetables.

Insight:

 

I found this news report to be a new perspective compared to the YouTube musical parody of “We Are Young” ---“We Are Hungry.” In fact, my other scoop was referenced in this news video. Seeing the actual waste that students were throwing away was very intriguing.  Ten unopened fruit cups were in the trash. I found it sad that so much perfectly fine food was going to waste. The food could be going to homeless shelter and feeding the hungry. I remember in high school many of my friends would throw away food the same way. I never realized how much it adds up. I hope that one-day public schools can implement a program like the Food Recovery Network at the University of Maryland to give leftover food to those in need.

Another aspect of the interview I found to be incredibly ridiculous. One official stated that studies show that naming carrots like “X-Ray carrots” or beans, “Powerbeans” would make students more inclined to eat them. This may work for elementary school students. While I found the renaming to be humorous, I do not believe renaming carrots will make sixteen years want to eat more carrots. After watching that segment focus on high school students, the whole video’s credibility decreased in my eyes. If they believe the study is true, then I believe they should definitely invest in some more studies. Instead, they should focus on student opinion and taste testing to encourage the high school students to eat healthy foods. 

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We Are Hungry

A parody on the national school lunch policy mandated by The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. 

 

You Tube


Via Ron Wolford
Karla Luetzow's insight:

High school students show their reaction to the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, in this video. It is made by high schools and uses popular music to highlight their negative prospective of this mandate by changing the popular song We Are Young by FUN to We Are Hungry. Intermingling facts about the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 to adding bits of comedy to the video, it is a creative, funny way to protest the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act.

This video can easily be related to the scoop about high school protests. This video was produced by high school students and has a negative connotation of the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010. Following what the previous article mentioned, these high school students believe the amount of food that they are being fed is not enough to fuel their hectic days. I enjoyed that this video pointed out that many students are involved in after school activities that burn up calories. In the video, a girl is displayed passing out at volleyball practice for being too hungry. I never thought about the calorie cut off as hurting anyone, but this video enlightened me on a new view on the topic. I would be interested if it could be a possibility if athletes could get extra helpings of food beyond the calorie cut off of 850 calories during in season training. Overall, I found this video to be light and humorous, but still informative. 

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Students Dish About Healthier School Lunches | Mission Loc@l

Students Dish About Healthier School Lunches | Mission Loc@l | Food in Schools | Scoop.it
At 10:45 am on a recent Wednesday, two food service employees at John O'Connell High School added finishing touches to the 190 lunches that would soon be served. Local chefs working for Revolution Foods in Oakland ...
Karla Luetzow's insight:

In contrast to other reactions to the Healthy, Hunger Free Act, this article takes a positive spin on the yummy, new wholesome food offered at John O'Connel High School in San Francisco, California. With 190 new school lunches, the students are pumped to eat this nutritious but delicious lunches that is sponsered by Food Revolution, a local food business.

 

While reading this article, I found it to really contrast other scoops on the Healthy, Hunger Free Act of 2010. This school has such a positve reaction to the change in lunches. However, the differnece in this school is the change not only to veggies and fruits, but also to fresh, local veggies and fruits. As I mentioned in another scoop, the quality of the food marks whether it is nutritious or not. I would love to go to a school like this. In fact, looking at the picture of the lunch is making me quite hungry. “Part of that is because the quality of the food is better now. Nothing’s frozen. Nothing’s artificial. It’s completely different." The difference is there. Looking at this local, fresh food compared to the video of the "vegetables" and "fruits" at other public high schools just shows the complete difference of quality. Schools should try to move to this kind of lunch. It is healthy and anyone would want to eat it! 

This school also adressed the point of wasted, unwanted food. Instead of throwing it out, there is a community table to put unwanted food. This school is a Title 1 school with as many as 65% of students on free or reduced lunch. The extra food can provide extra substance for later in the day to these students. I absolutley love the lunch program at this school. It seems to address most of the issues of other school lunch programs. Hopefully, this can continue to grow and spread around the United States! 


 

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Alaska Gateway schools win a $44,999 grant to buy local food

Alaska Gateway schools win a $44,999 grant to buy local food | Food in Schools | Scoop.it
Native American Times - #1 Source for Native news in the US.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

This news article talks about a $44,999 grant by the USDA for a Farm to School project in Tok, Alaska. In general, farm to school project emphasizes using local foods to supply school food. It also educates students about nutrition and supports local businesses. Specifically, the Farm to School Project in Alaska will rework an existing greenhouse and garden project, which will increase food production to the maximum during the short growing time.

 

In my hometown of Nashville, all the restaurants are converting to being “local.” Many magazines and news reporters are discussing this new “local movement.” I personally love the idea of local food. The food is fresh, and it supports local businesses. All the restaurants I have tried which endorse local food have been delicious and nutritious. However, my high school lunch did not participate in this local food movement. I would have loved if my high school supported local businesses. Especially in agriculturally rich Tennesssee, many farms are all around my high school, which would make the transportation of goods economical and environmental. The entire community unites and benefits from the local movement.

 

Therefore, I support the amount of money invested in The Farm to Table project. It is part of the Healthy, Hunger Free Act of 2011 as seen in other scoops. I think this is a great initiative to combat obesity in the United States. I especially like that this act also educates the population about nutrition. Education about nutrition will help save future generations from obesity. I also wonder how long this shift to local foods will be supported by the government before it becomes self-sufficient. I do not think it will take too much time for it to become more independent. With $350 million of local foods served, I hope they continue this local food movement.

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School lunch standards in Europe (EUFIC)

School lunch standards in Europe (EUFIC) | Food in Schools | Scoop.it
Cultural and economic differences influence the type and quality of school lunches throughout Europe. School lunch makes a substantial contribution to children’s total energy and nutritional intake.
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

This website gives information about the standards and funding across Europe for school lunches. For example, the Finland government funds all of the school lunches. Therefore, no student has to pay for lunch. An interesting aspect of Finland is a student cannot bring a lunch from home. Across Europe, nutritional guidelines are different, but a few countries follow the plate model. The plate model guides students how to fill their plate.

Insight:

 

This article somewhat shocked me. I found the varying degree of nutritional standards in Europe very surprising. Some countries like Norway and Denmark do not supply school lunches. After being in a public school system in the United States that does, I have some bias on that subject. I felt that every school should offer some sort of nutrition on site. If a student forgot their lunch, there would be no way for the student to end his or her hunger. As learned from my other scoops, the amount of nutrition and the kind of nutrition a student receives can really affect a student’s focus level. This focus level could then affect academics. Overall, my upbringing in the United States where they always provide a school lunch influenced my reaction to the lack of school lunches on Norway and Denmark.

On the opposite side of the spectrum, Finland provides free school lunches for everyone, but does not allow students to bring a lunch from home. This also shocked me due to my own upbringing. I would always bring a lunch from home on days when I did not like the menu choice for the day. This mandate may be due to allergies, but I still find it ridiculous. A student should have the choice to bring food from home. It can reflect culture and provide a sense of home at school. I know that many parents would leave notes to their child in their lunch bag to read at school. It was a big factor in helping in homesickness in one of my friends. Therefore, I find this policy in Finland very surprising and not the best. 

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Healthier School Lunches Face Student Rejection

Healthier School Lunches Face Student Rejection | Food in Schools | Scoop.it

Students get more fruits and vegetables under new nutritional requirements for public school lunches, but many children just toss them away.
The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required public schools to follow new nutritional guidelines this academic year to receive extra federal lunch aid, has created a nationwide version of the age-old parental challenge: persuading children to eat what is good for them.
According to the new restrictions, high school lunches must be no more than 850 calories, middle school lunches no more than 700 calories and elementary school lunches no more than 650. Before, there were no maximums.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Karla Luetzow's insight:

 

This news article from the New York Times reflects on the recent protests from high school students against the new school lunches. Rising in price from $2.50 to $2.60, it seems like this ten percent increase would not cause this much commotion. However, it is more about the amount of food and quality of food in each lunch. Due to the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2011, an 850 calorie cut off per meal was mandated to all high school lunches. Therefore, as price increased, the portions decreased. All over the country high school students have protested this new lunch claiming that vegetables are “gross.” Researchers in this article claim it will just take time for the students to adjust.

 

Insight:

 

While reading this article, I thought the high school students sounded like snobby, unhealthy, and unrealistic. A quote that especially raveled my bones was by a high schooler who stated,” “Now there’s no taste, no flavor and it’s healthy, which makes it taste even worse.” It bothers me that “healthy” food is considered gross. There are so many healthy, delicious options out there that I believe that this student is being very narrow-minded. To me, it seems more like quote by a seven year old than by a high school senior.

However, after my initial reaction, I remembered saying the same things about my high school cafeteria food. I saw my high school go through a similar shift a few years ago. Pizza and fries were replaced with salads and apples. I have always enjoyed fruits and vegetables. A lot of the time I will choose a yummy, wholesome salad over a greasy pizza. However, this was not the case in my own high school cafeteria. It is pretty difficult to mess up pizza and fries. However, vegetables loaded in grease and cooked down to mush can get disgusting pretty fast. Therefore, I have the preconceived idea that high school cafeterias try to make healthy food but ultimately fail by loading it in grease. The same can be said about the University of Maryland’s dining services. Most of the value meals are cooked in so much grease that the vegetables do not really add nutritional value. 

I really love the idea of adding healthier options. However, the portion size must be able to satisfy the student body. The United States should look at European schools for inspiration. In most European countries, schools must cycle lunches every ten to twenty days. They also are now allowing student and even parent test-tasting before a meal gets approved for a school lunch. With the community working together, I believe this school protests can end and healthier food can be a realistic, yummy, and satisfying option in public high schools.

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Jenny Sloane's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:54 PM

Revolutionizing school lunches is clearly a very difficult task. Students are used to eating comfort foods like pizza, fries, chicken tenders, and nachos. It is unrealistic to think that any child would willingly want to give up those delicious foods that they are so used to eating for healthy meals, like sandwiches and green beans. Change is always challanging. However, I believe if schools stick with adopting new, healthy meals younger students will not have the same problem because they will only grow up eating the healthier foods. Therefore, they will never know what they are missing out on and be healthier along the way. With that being said, the transition period will be the most difficult. I am not surprised that this article is about high school kids who went on a strike because they wanted their old meals back. Before reading this article, I had no idea that there are not set calorie restrictions on school lunches. Although I am all for healthier school lunches, there are a couple of arguments made in this article that I do agree with. First of all, high school students are often very active. I personally played a sport every season all four years of high school. That meant practicing every day after school for two hours. If we had lunch at 12:30 and then practice from 4:30-6:30 I would not get home and eat dinner until about 7:15. That is a very long time for any growing teenager to go without eating a solid meal. Therefore, I agree with the fact that many teens do need a lot of food throughout the day that may often exceed the calorie limit. Furthermore, there is no question that most of the time, healthier food options are more expensive. This is also a huge problem for many students and families who simply do not have the resources to afford whatever food they want. I know I am very fortunate and my parents could always provide for me. I also agree that as long as children are still given an option of what they can eat for lunch, they will be unlikely to go for the healthier choice.