Nutrition and Development
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The Cafes of Amsterdam

The Cafes of Amsterdam | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
This is the fifth of a six post series on the architecture and culture of Amsterdam. This summer I was there for a few days in May on my way to Samos Greece and then for a week’s stay on...
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Will data linking open defecation to undernutrition force change?

Will data linking open defecation to undernutrition force change? | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Mark Tran: Studies suggest there is a strong link between open defecation and undernutrition in India. Is sanitation being taken seriously?
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The Indian school lunch deaths are tragic but we must not lose perspective

The Indian school lunch deaths are tragic but we must not lose perspective | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Abhijeet Singh: The free midday meals scheme has improved the lives of many schoolchildren, boosting attendance and nutrition
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The cost of hunger in Swaziland

The cost of hunger in Swaziland | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Swaziland’s reliance on international donors has averted famine but masked the reality of chronic food shortages and widespread malnutrition and stunting, according to a new study released by the government and the World Food Programme (WFP).
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Development Horizons by Lawrence Haddad: IDS Transforming Nutrition Summer School 2013: Debates and Reflections

Development Horizons by Lawrence Haddad: IDS Transforming Nutrition Summer School 2013: Debates and Reflections | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
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Editorial: Women as a tool against hunger

Editorial: Women as a tool against hunger | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
YES, our women are more represented than in other countries. No, it is not in our history nor culture to physically we have never even fallen into mutilating of body parts like female circumcision so ...
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Complimentary feeding should begin at six months of age: Experts - Times of India

Complimentary feeding should begin at six months of age: Experts
Times of India
Beginning any later may result in under-nutrition and an insufficiently developed immune system.
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Food sustainability needs a triple focus: Supply, demand and distribution - FoodNavigator.com

Food sustainability needs a triple focus: Supply, demand and distribution - FoodNavigator.com | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
FoodNavigator.com Food sustainability needs a triple focus: Supply, demand and distribution FoodNavigator.com Meanwhile, those focused on changing consumption habits raise important points on considering the environment and nutrition together – but...
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Moving the Dial on Poverty and Hunger: What are Feed the Future’s High-Level Outcome Targets?

Moving the Dial on Poverty and Hunger: What are Feed the Future’s High-Level Outcome Targets? | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it

23 July 2013, USAID Impact Blog,  -- "The second Feed the Future progress report is out and is generating a lot of buzz about the initiative’s successes last year.

 

People are talking about big numbers like:

 

* 9 million households benefiting directly from Feed the Future investments

* More than 7 million farmers applying new technologies or management practices

* More than 12 million children under five reached by nutrition programs

* Over $115 million in new private sector investment in the agricultural sector as a result of Feed the Future interventions. 

 

With more projects coming online and more USAID Missions and agencies like the Peace Corps and the U.S. African Development Foundation reporting into the Feed the Future Monitoring System in fiscal year 2012, results like these are expected to continue.

 

These numbers are more than just impressive statistics. They are also critical checkpoints on the road toward achieving Feed the Future’s goal of sustainably reducing poverty and undernutrition. Their placement on this road or “causal pathway” can be seen in the Feed the Future Results Framework (PDF), the conceptual and analytic structure that outlines the initiative’s goals and objectives.

 

Targets and Targeting

 

In order to track progress toward our goal, Feed the Future, as a whole, has set aspirational targets of reducing the prevalence of extreme poverty (those that live on less than $1.25 per day) and the prevalence of stunting in children under 5 years of age by 20 percent across all Feed the Future focus countries in the areas in which the initiative works. Individual country-level targets are set against these goals, based on the conditions and context on the ground, and range between 15 to 30 percent in each country, averaging approximately 20 percent overall.

 

From the beginning, we knew that Feed the Future could not do everything, do it everywhere, and do it well. That’s why Feed the Future prioritizes and concentrates efforts and resources in 19 focus countries where the Rome Principles can be best realized. We’ve further focused our resources within these countries in zones of influence: geographic areas strategically chosen based on need and strong potential for agriculture-led economic growth. Feed the Future tracks reductions in extreme poverty and stunting in these zones through baseline, midterm and final population-based surveys conducted in these areas.

 

Using Data to Understand

 

We’re currently tabulating the results of the baseline population-based surveys. The raw survey datasets for Bangladesh and Ghana are already available, with more to come. We’ll conduct midterm population-based surveys in 2015 and final population-based surveys in 2017. Results will be available in 2016 and 2018, respectively.

 

While real changes in poverty and stunting (the result of chronic undernutrition over time) take time to occur and are, therefore, difficult to measure on a year-to-year basis, independent data does show that poverty rates fell by an average of 5.6 percent across Feed the Future focus countries from 2005 to 2011, and stunting decreased by an average of six percent from 2009 to 2012*. Feed the Future has helped contribute to these trends in the past few years and works to accelerate them in the future. Through population-based household surveys, Feed the Future will be able to show progress in its development hypothesis that agriculture-led growth and a commitment to nutrition can help reduce poverty and hunger.

These surveys also track other data (PDF) critical to understanding Feed the Future’s impact such as women’s empowerment, which we measure through the recently-developed Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index; women’s dietary diversity; breastfeeding; minimum acceptable diet; expenditures; and comprehensive household demographic information.

 

How We Got There

 

Of course, this is not the only way Feed the Future is looking at high-level, outcome data on reducing poverty and hunger. Feed the Future also seeks to understand what interventions are successful, in what contexts, and why. Those questions are at the front and center of Feed the Future’s robust Learning Agenda.

 

Through the Learning Agenda, Feed the Future is conducting more than 40 impact evaluations to look at key questions related to the Feed the Future Results Framework. An evaluation currently underway in Uganda is looking at how different approaches to integrate gender work to improve nutritional status and dietary diversity. Another in Cambodia is assessing the impact of extension services on increasing farm productivity, household food availability, and income, as well as how interventions that promote the diversification of the food system impact dietary diversity and nutrition among women and children.

 

These impact evaluations, paired with annual monitoring results like in our latest progress report, will also help us keep a pulse on our progress toward meeting our “20-20 goals” and help us demonstrate how we are getting there.


Via GR2Food
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Pacific could face food shortage by 2030 :: FoodProcessing

Pacific could face food shortage by 2030 :: FoodProcessing | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of Wollongong say that Pacific Island communities could face food shortages due to dwindling fish stocks by as early as 2030 - a problem that could be exacerbated by climate change.
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Study links hygiene and height

Study links hygiene and height | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Soap and clean water for effective handwashing can help boost a young child’s growth, according to the first large-scale scientific review to link hygiene to height - one measure of child nutrition.
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Exclusive Breastfeeding: Empowering Mothers to Keep Their Babies Free from HIV | Global Health Hub: news and blogosphere aggregator

Exclusive Breastfeeding: Empowering Mothers to Keep Their Babies Free from HIV | Global Health Hub: news and blogosphere aggregator | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Keeping up with global health & development news, blogosphere, journals, forums, events, jobs and more.
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Corporations and the fight against hunger: why CSR won't do

Corporations and the fight against hunger: why CSR won't do | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
There is an opportunity for the private sector to lead in tackling chronic malnutrition, but seeing it as corporate social responsibility or charity is damaging
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Cambodia tests 'super rice' to fortify its children

Cambodia tests 'super rice' to fortify its children | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Specialists hope that if substituting regular rice with super rice is successful in Cambodia, they can improve the lives of millions of children across the world.
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Women and girls are key to ensuring food security – report

Women and girls are key to ensuring food security – report | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Empowering women and achieving gender equality are the most cost-effective ways to ensure food security, says the U.N. special rapporteur on the right to food
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Poor nutrition 'stunting growth' - BBC News

Poor nutrition 'stunting growth' - BBC News | Nutrition and Development | Scoop.it
Poor nutrition 'stunting growth'
BBC News
Unicef chief Ann Veneman said: "Undernutrition steals a child's strength and makes illnesses that the body might otherwise fight off far more dangerous.
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Partnership for Improved Nutrition in Nepal

This documentary highlights the efforts that the Government of Nepal with support of UNICEF-EU partnership to improve the undernutrition situation among youn...
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