Inuit Nunangat Stories
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Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
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All in the Family; Single-Parent Families higher in the North

All in the Family; Single-Parent Families higher in the North | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
[excerpts] ...the percentage of families led by a single parent is far higher in the North than in Southern Canada. ... In Canada's North, these challenges might be further compounded by problems related to overcrowded housing (see Sleeping on the Couch), low high school graduation rates (see High School Confidential), and, in some regions, higher unemployment rates (see Go South, Young Man). ... About the Series

Here, the North is a bi-weekly series researched, written, and produced by The Conference Board of Canada's Centre for the North. The series is designed to illustrate similarities and differences--between Canada's North and South, and between Northern regions-in keeping with the Centre's mandate to provide policy--directed research to decision makers.
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Arctic snow harbors deadly assassin

[excerpt]

Heavy and prolonged snowfall can bring about unexpected conditions that encourage fungal growth, leading to the death of plants in the Arctic, according to experts.

A new international study confirms that whilst snow has an insulating effect which helps plants to grow bigger, heavy and prolonged snow can, in certain circumstances, also encourage the rapid and extensive growth of killer fungal strains.

The research results, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, show for the first time the potential long term effects of unexpected fungal development on an arctic landscape. Extensive damage to a pervasive species under snowier conditions would leave gaps for another plant to take its place over time but could also alter the food–web for insects, voles, lemmings and their predators.
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Search for ill-fated, historic Franklin expedition could continue this summer

Search for ill-fated, historic Franklin expedition could continue this summer | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Parks Canada is quietly organizing a third season of searching this summer for the lost ships of Sir John Franklin — the 19th-century British explorer whose ill-fated expedition to the Canadian Arctic in the 1840s ended with the sinking ... The disappearance of the Franklin vessels, a profoundly traumatic moment for Victorian-era Britain and its Canadian colonies, prompted a series of Royal Navy rescue attempts that failed to find the ships but mapped much of the Arctic archipelago, ultimately securing sovereignty over the vast region for the future Canada.

The final resting place of the Franklin wrecks, which are believed to lie somewhere in the ice-choked waters off Nunavut’s King William Island, has eluded recent generations of searchers determined to locate one of the great global prizes of underwater archeology.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/technology/Search+fated+historic+Franklin+expedition+could+continue+this+summer/4970054/story.html#ixzz1PgZDHk3b
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#Norway visit turns #Nunavut elder into #literacy advocate

#Norway visit turns #Nunavut elder into #literacy advocate | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Nina Hermansen, an instructor at Finnmark University College, at the left, hosted Cambridge Bay elder and Nunavut Arctic College student Annie Neglak, right, during Neglak's recent one-month stay at the college in Alta, Norway. Last year, Hermansen and a colleague visited Cambridge Bay. (PHOTO COURTESY OF A.NEGLAK)

[excerpt]

after a recent trip to Norway, she sees there’s a different way to learn a language.

There, she saw educated indigenous people — the Saami — passing on their own language and culture as teachers in daycare centres, schools and colleges.

Neglak now has a new mission, she told Nunatsiaq News: to encourage her fellow Inuit to read and write well.

Neglak, a graduate of adult basic education and social services worker diploma programs at Cambridge Bay’s Nunavut Arctic College, returned June 12 from Alta, Norway, where she studied — and attended — literacy programs for new immigrants and refugees.

Neglak’s one-month-long stay at Finnmark University College in Alta was her first time outside Canada.

The scenery she saw in the far north of Norway resembled the lush, treed and rocky landscape of her beloved Bathurst Inlet.

And salmon and reindeer — the preferred diet of her Saami hosts — also suited her fine.

There, she says she met “wonderful people — just like Inuit— who like meat, fish and the outdoors.”

But those were the similarities.

As for the differences, what struck Annie the most was high educational level of the Saami professionals she met.

Neglak saw how Saami — the indigenous people of northern Europe, who number about 75,000 in Norway— teach Saami and promote education, starting with children as young as one year old.

Even childcare workers must earn degrees to work with these young children — “not just anyone willing to work Monday to Friday,” Neglak found.

Her experiences in Norway made Neglak determined to go back home and encourage people in her community to improve their literacy and that of their children.

“How are we going to improve if we are struggling with reading and writing?”

Here answer to that is Inuit — of every age— have to “come back to school.”
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Canada's latest plans for Far North

Canada's latest plans for Far North | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
There don't seem to be any "secrets" for success in northern economic development, just one simple truth: development will stem from the exploitation of natural resources.

[excerpt]

In the puzzle that is northern economic development, two pieces presented themselves in the past few weeks: the province of Quebec’s ambitious Plan Nord http://www.plannord.gouv.qc.ca/english/index.asp , a 25-year mega-plan covering everything from jobs to the environment; and the Inuit Circumpolar Council’s conservative Declaration on Resource Development Principles. http://www.inuit.org/index.php?id=432&contUid=0
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#Nunavut sponsors residency for Tony Anguhalluq & Jamasie Pitseolak at Montreal’s Studio PM Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/Marion+Scott+Gallery+exhibition+pushes+boundaries+traditio...

#Nunavut sponsors residency for Tony Anguhalluq & Jamasie Pitseolak at Montreal’s Studio PM  Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/Marion+Scott+Gallery+exhibition+pushes+boundaries+traditio... | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Sugar-lift etching allows artists to create looser and more gestural works. ...The prints came about because of a unique collaboration. Marion Scott Gallery/Kardosh Projects (MSG/KP) co-sponsored, with the Nunavut government, a two-week residency for Tony Anguhalluq and Jamasie Pitseolak at Montreal’s Studio PM, the leading Inuit printmaker in the country. Kenojouak Ashevak and Jutai Toonoo, the other two artists, created prints in Cape Dorset with the support of West Baffin Eskimo Cooperative, Studio PM and Dorset Fine arts.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/travel/Marion+Scott+Gallery+exhibition+pushes+boundaries+traditional+prints/4952066/story.html#ixzz1PQBHW547
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Northerners seek subsidies for country foods

[excerpt] Nutrition North officials say they have yet to find a way to offer a subsidy on country foods going from one northern community to the next.

The program’s advisory board has indicated a “strong desire” from Inuit and others in the North to ship country foods at a subsidized rate to and from other communities, a Nutrition North spokesperson told a May 31 public meeting in Iqaluit.

The program now provides a subsidy for shipping commercially-produced country foods from federally-approved facilities – of which there are three in Nunavut.

Subsidizing personal shipments between Nunavut communities “has not been addressed yet,” said Stephen Van Dine, the director general of devolution and territorial relations under Aboriginal and Northern Development Canada.

‘We don’t have the machinery yet, but we’re working on it,” Van Dine said.

Iqaluit resident Monica Ell told the May 31 meeting that the cost of shipping food to relatives in other communities is too steep – despite subsidies offered by some northern airlines.

Ell asked Nutrition North officials if local hunters could be registered as eligible suppliers under Nunavut’s hunter support programs.

But Van Dine explained that Nutrition North can only provide a subsidy for the transportation of country foods processed in federally-regulated commercial plants.
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Two Aboriginal Challenge arts awards go to Nunavik artists @NunatsiaqNews

Two Aboriginal Challenge arts awards go to Nunavik artists @NunatsiaqNews | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The 2011 Canadian Aboriginal Writing and Arts Challenge has recognized entries from two Nunavik youth with awards: Charleen Watt of Kuujjuaq and Gabriel Uqaituk of Montreal.

Watt, a graphic designers with the Kativik School Board, studied desktop publishing at the KSB’s technical and vocational school in Inukjuak.

For her entry, Watt submitted a photo-montage illustration of an Inuk woman’s parka-encircled face in which other images can be seen.

“The images in the details represent a lot of my peoples’ cultures beyond just her face…[such as] bonding more openly..we connect too with the nature, taking from the land with lots of respect,” reads her statement accompanying the entry. “Like [in] Kuujjuaq, there are many programs for the youth to learn to use their spare time to enjoy their talents and show the world when they get to travel. Opening their views to wider than just [to] their community. This is my piece of art I’d like to share.”

An image by Gabriel Uqaituk, 24, a document and photo technician at Avataq Cultural Institute who lives in Montreal, won fourth prize.

Uqaituk’s image was created using Photoshop CS4 and was originally printed on an 11 inch x17 inch glossy paper.

“It represents the arrival of the Europeans in the North and one of the many beliefs and ways of life they have brought to the Inuit people,” says Uqaituk’s statement about his entry.

The top part shows a ship, on which the explorers were able to reach the northern lands, he said.

To the left is a cross, representing religion.

“The bottom part shows three circles, which represent the ancient Inuit way of life, the community, where everybody had a role to support, share and positively thrive in the harsh conditions of the North,” he said.

“The man is my great-grandfather, Aisa Koperqualuk, taken from a picture in the 1950′s, which I acquired from the Frederica Knight’s collection at the Avataq Cultural Institute’s archives.”

Koperqualuk was born in 1916 and died in 2001.
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Nanisivik, #Nunavut naval facility project delayed at least two years

Nanisivik, #Nunavut naval facility project delayed at least two years | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Nanisivik, Nunavut naval facility project delayed at least two years- The Nanisivik port in Nunavut was originally supposed to be at least partially up and running by next summer, following a promise made by Prime Minister Harper...
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Autopsies completed on slain Iqaluit family - #CBCNorth

Autopsies completed on slain Iqaluit family - #CBCNorth | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Autopsies completed on slain Iqaluit familyCBC.caSula Enuaraq, Sylvain Degrasse, and their daughters Alexandra, 7, and Aliyah Degrasse, 2, were found dead on June 7, in a tragedy that has shaken Nunavut's capital.
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Rankin Inlet #Nunavut #Inuk filmmaker wins first prize at Toronto International Film Festival's Student Film Showcase

Rankin Inlet #Nunavut #Inuk filmmaker wins first prize at Toronto International Film Festival's Student Film Showcase | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Rankin Inlet filmmaker Ippiksaut Friesen has recently won best animation film the Toronto International Film Festival's Student Film Showcase on May 23.

This year the 22-year-old graduated from Emily Carr University in Vancouver, B.C., with a degree in fine arts and produced the animated film The Dimming, Inuktitut/English animation.

"It feels great," said Friesen. "I didn't expect that, they had a lot of great films."

As part of winning the award, the filmmaker received an industry pass to the Toronto film festival in September, the Directors Guild Awards in October, given a grant and a computer.

The short film is based on an Inuit story about the sun and the moon and is told through print-making and other mediums.

She wanted to pursue the idea for the film after hearing the story told about the Dimming Qulliq festival from a dancer.

"It was told with a lot of human emotion to it," she said.

The filmmaker thought it was important to have the main language of the film in Inuktitut.
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Inuuvunga - I Am Inuk, I Am Alive

In this feature-length documentary, 8 Inuit teens with cameras offer a vibrant and contemporary view of life in Canada’s North. They also use their newly acquired film skills to confront a broad range of issues, from the widening communication gap between youth and their elders to the loss of their peers to suicide. In Inuktitut with English subtitles.
o Mila Aung-Thwin, Daniel Cross, Bobby Echalook, Brett Gaylor, Sarah Idlout, Laura Iqaluk, Linus Kasudluak, Willia Ningeok, Caroline Ningiuk, Rita-Lucy Ohaituk & Dora Ohaituk,
o 2004,
o 57 min
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Home > Vol 64, No 2 (2011)
ARCTIC
Arctic is North America's premier journal of northern research! Now in its seventh decade of continuous publishing, Arctic contains contributions from any area of scholarship dealing with the polar and subpolar regions of the world. Articles in Arctic present original research and have withstood intensive peer review. Arctic also publishes reviews of new books on the North, profiles of significant people, places and northern events, and topical commentaries.
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LIVE WEBCAST:: Arctic Imperative Summit - June 19-21

LIVE WEBCAST:: Arctic Imperative Summit - June 19-21 | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
How should the U.S. and other nations prepare for the challenges and opportunities of a changing Arctic? Watch the discussion live June 19-21.

LIVE WEBCAST: #Arctic Imperative Summit June 19-21 How should the U.S. & other nations prepare for the challenges and opportunities of a changing Arctic? http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/live-arctic-imperative-summit
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More safe shelters needed for Inuit women: Pauktuutit

“More than 70 per cent of our communities are without a safe shelter for women and children victims of violence,” Sheutiapik said in a release. “Given the overcrowded and inadequate housing so many of our people are forced to live in and the exorbitant cost of transportation between our communities, this can too often mean that an Inuk woman may literally have nowhere to go to escape violence in the home.”

http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/18667_more_safe_shelters_needed_for_inuit_women_pauktuutit/
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11th Annual Signal + Noise Media Art Festival |-Nimalan Yoganathan’s sound performance of augmented field recordings from Inukjuak, Nunavik.

11th Annual Signal + Noise Media Art Festival |-Nimalan Yoganathan’s sound performance of augmented field recordings from Inukjuak, Nunavik. | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The 2011 festival aims to create a space for the anxieties and tensions of this moment–haltered between the past and the future–to fold in on themselves. [excerpt] Ellie Ga’s five-month residency aboard a research sailboat frozen in the ice near the North Pole informs her autobiographical performance featuring photographic documentation, writing, video, drawing, and slides. The desire to translate one’s experience of travel and exploration is echoed in Nimalan Yoganathan’s sound performance of augmented field recordings from Inukjuak, Nunavik.
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Native language skills key to Inuit academic success: report

Native language skills key to Inuit academic success: report | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Government, parents urged to step up to help Inuit children make the grade... [excerpt] Aboriginal leaders say governments, businesses and parents must all step up to improve the dismal state of education for Inuit children.

“We need to do much more to get the graduation rates up in terms of our kids who aren't getting through school,” Mary Simon, head of Canada's national Inuit group, said Thursday at the release of a report on the future of Inuit education.
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MINISTER AMBROSE ENDORSES EDMONTON'S ANGEL WAY

MINISTER AMBROSE ENDORSES EDMONTON'S ANGEL WAY: RAISING AWARENESS OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

EDMONTON, June 15, 2011 /CNW/ - Today the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women, made the following statement concerning the re-naming of part of 101A Avenue in Edmonton "Okisikow (Angel) Way."

"I am personally committed to raising awareness and working towards ending violence against women and girls. That's why I would like to commend all those involved in the honorary naming of this downtown section of 101A Avenue "Okisikow (Angel) Way" to help spread awareness of domestic violence.

I was deeply moved when I visited the first "Angel Street" in Iqaluit, Nunavut. I am proud that my city has taken up Iqaluit's challenge to designate an "Angel Street" in memory of the victims of domestic violence. Some participating cities include Yellowknife, Fredericton and Kamloops. The Angel Street Project recognizes that violence against women affects us all, destroying families, weakening the fabric of our society, and taking a heavy toll on our communities and our economy. Since 2006, our government has worked tirelessly to make our communities safer and to prevent crime. We have taken strong action, including increasing penalties for violent crimes; introducing legislation that would increase penalties for the sexual abuse of children and strengthening the peace bond provisions concerning persons previously convicted of sexual offences against children; raising the age of consent for sexual activity from 14 to 16; ending the use of house arrest for offences involving serious personal injury; enacting three specific Criminal Code offences that prohibit trafficking of persons; and increasing support for victims of crime.

In addition, since 2007, the Government of Canada has invested more than $30 million in projects to end violence against women and girls in communities across the country; this is in addition to the $10 million over two years for a strategy to address the alarming number - and pressing issue - of missing and murdered Aboriginal women.

I am proud to be part of a government that is committed to ensuring the fair, equitable and respectful treatment of all citizens, and to taking further decisive action against all acts of violence against women and girls."

Ce texte est également disponible en français.

For news releases and information on Status of Women Canada, go to http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca.

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Native American Netroots: Growing Up Inuit

Native American Netroots: Growing Up Inuit | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Yesterday my diary centered on domestic abuse among American Indians, wherein I included the example of a 1989 study that quantified domestic violence among 19 indigenous peoples of North America. Markers of low to minimal levels of violence included:

...shared decision making, wives' control of some family resources, equally easy divorce access for husbands and wives, no premarital sex double standard, monogamous marriage, marital cohabitation, peaceful conflict resolution within and outside the home, and immediate social responses to domestic violence

Alaska Natives generally have very high rates of domestic abuse today. What literature I've found thus far has not been instructive on whether this is more frequent among differing peoples (Aleut, Yupik, Inuit, even down to differences in localities) and what effect colonization and assimilation has made on the northern peoples.

The Inuit, for instance, have a starkly unique culture that is as much fascinating as it is morally challenging.
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The most famous Canadian photographer you’ve never heard of

The most famous Canadian photographer you’ve never heard of | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
You’d hardly know it, but George Hunter’s work is everywhere... “George has always been an icon in our business,” says Bert Hoferichter, an Alliston, Ontario-based photographer. “His images of the Eskimo from 1940 are just unbelievable. There are very few people in our business who have come close to what he has done.”
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Indigenous Issues in Post-Secondary Education - #Nunavut Sivuniksavut training program in Ottawa

Indigenous Issues in Post-Secondary Education - #Nunavut Sivuniksavut training program in Ottawa | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
National Inuit Leader Mary Simon - President, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

The Nunavut Sivuniksavut training program in Ottawa has just celebrated its 25th anniversary with a new home and plans for expansion. NS, as it is called, is an eight-month cultural immersion program for Nunavut Inuit.
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Making It Work: Implementing #Nunavut's Historic Language Acts

Making It Work: Implementing #Nunavut's Historic Language Acts | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The goals of the language acts were ambitious. They represent an attempt to make the Inuktitut language into a language of everyday life in Nunavut - in homes, schools, workplaces and government offices - while protecting the language rights of French and English speakers. If that's the destination, the proposed Uqausivut Comprehensive Plan is the roadmap - a comprehensive schedule that sets out in detail the actions required by government, educators, the private sector, organizations and the public to achieve those goals, and achieve substantive equality between the Inuit, French, and English languages in Nunavut.
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New taxi company in Arviat #Nunavut

[excerpt] Arviat residents looking for a ride home from the grocery store or the airport have a new option since Joe's Taxi Service started in early May.

Owner Joe Ishalook and another driver are offering taxi rides for five dollars per person for a ride in either a four-door vehicle or a 15-passenger van.

He said they make about $150 a day, excluding tips.

"In the fall, it should pick up. It's steady right now. It's slow but steady," he said.

Ishalook was in the taxi business from 2001 to 2004 before taking some time off.

"I am happy I have restarted the taxi (business) and I have customers that are saying 'welcome back,'" he said.
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Ottawa weighs funding bilingual education for Inuit children

Ottawa weighs funding bilingual education for Inuit children | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The Conservative government is expected to react positively to a report that recommends Inuit children be educated in their native tongue.

But Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan will not commit the federal government to implementing that strategy, a departmental official said Monday, speaking on background.
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Young Inupiaq leaders tackle suicide in their Alaskan communities

"Walk for Life" started as a small effort to address suicide in Northwest Alaska spread statewide this year to more than 30 communities. A walk that started as a way to address suicides in Northwest Alaska has spread across the state, and opened a dialogue on a topic many once preferred to sweep under the rug.

Statewide, thousands of people in more than 30 communities participated in the Walk for Life on May 14. More villages, this time from Southeast, are scheduled to walk in another event later this summer, said Kristen Walker, youth development specialist at the Northwest Arctic Borough mayor.

Walker recalled this year's walks in a speech given on Thursday, during the state's first-ever conference on what's called postvention, or community healing after a suicide.

The goal of the conference is creating action plans so every village has the resources - such as counselors, health professionals, clergy and student leaders - to help adults and kids recover after a suicide.
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