Inuit Nunangat Stories
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Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
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Headlines for Nunavut News North for July 11th 2011

Headlines for Nunavut News North for July 11th 2011 | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
* Conference delegates hear thoughts on Inuit identity. Redfern and Anawak among presenters sharing insight on Inuit reality
* Cruise ship business goes up and down. Expected visits receive mixed reaction from communities
* Electronic health files get a boost. Reviews mostly positive in Cambridge Bay and Iqaluit
* Man alleging discrimination seeks $12,500. First human rights hearing in Nunavut involves construction worker
OPINION
* Inexcusable hazards. Coast guard and Transport Canada must do more to protect boaters
* Dangerous and discriminatory path started in Rankin Inlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
* Festival packs in the arts. Alianait Arts Festival concludes with successful seventh year
SPORTS
* Louis Nutarariaq back on the podium. Iqaluit judoka claims bronze medal at national junior championships
BUSINESS
* Korean interest in North kept low-key. Korean Gas Corporation visit played down, MGM Energy investment "modest"
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Golden Valley & #Nunavik Nickel Mines Ltd.

VAL-D'OR, QUEBEC--(Marketwire - July 8, 2011) -... Nunavik Nickel Mines Ltd. and Uranium Valley Mines Ltd. (the "Subsidiaries") to be distributed by Golden Valley under the terms of the Arrangement [....] THIS PRESS RELEASE IS NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION IN THE UNITED STATES OR TO U.S. NEWS AGENCIES

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/357781#ixzz1Rf9ZX41X
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Inhabit Media offers Inuit storytelling to the world

Inhabit Media offers Inuit storytelling to the world | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
A page from Uumajut: volume 2, a children's book Arctic wildlife. The new release from Inhabiit Media teaches young readers about Arctic animals and their traditional Inuit uses. Uumajut is written by Simon Awa, the late Seeglook Akeegok, Anna Zeigler and Stephanie McDonald and illustrated by Romi Caron. (PHOTO BY SARAH ROGERS)

[excerpt]

The 288-page book contains animal fables, tales of hardships and famines and creation stories.

One of them, Atanaarjuat, is a story that originates in south Baffin region about a man who evades his killers by fleeing barefoot across the spring ice. The story formed the basis on the award-winning film Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner.

Other fables explain how hunters came to perfect their craft. The Kivalliq version of The Muskox is a fable about two muskox singing together as they rub their skins, only to be drawn up a hill and killed by hunters.

Many of the stories were first recorded by ethnologists like Knud Rasmussen and Franz Boas.

The stories that make up Unikkaaqtuat were researched and compiled by Neil Christopher and edited by Noel McDermott and Louise Flaherty.

As evident in Unikkaaqtuaq, Inuit legend includes many stories of orphans.

An orphan discovers the strange beings that live in the ocean under the ice in Elisha Kilabuk’s new book The Qalupalik, the first in a series of children’s stories called Unikkaakuluit.

[...]

Inhabit Media’s books are available at Arctic Ventures in Iqaluit or online by visiting http://www.inhabitmedia.com
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Arviat #NUNAVUT Students paying their way To Winnipeg

[excerpt] ARVIAT - A group of Arviat youth have learned the value of working together to achieve a common goal.

The students - named the Grade 10 fundraisers and led by John Arnalukjuak High School teacher Nancy Uluadluak - volunteered their time during the past three years to raise enough money for a trip to Winnipeg, which they finally took this past week.

Making the trip were Douglas Ollie, Dorean Arloo, Seporah Innukshuk, Kalene Gibbons, Mary Nagiyak, Samuel Karetak, April Aliktiluk, Andrea Kablutsiak, Daniel Alagalak, Mary Ulimaumi, Jackson Kablutsiak, Kirsten Kaludjak, Rochelle Illnik, Ursula Alikaswa and Uukkualuk Karetak.

They were accompanied by Uluadluak, Jessie Kaludjak and Sam Alagalak.

Uluadluak said the group started its fundraising efforts in June 2008 when the students were in Grade 10.

She said a number of those who took the trip will graduate this year, with others needing to complete a few more courses for their diplomas.

"I want to do what I can to help young people, and I want to show them the value of volunteering their time," said Uluadluak.

"We started with $72 from bake sales at the school.
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Curtis Konek with the Nanisiniq: Arviat History Project video: Why research?

Curtis Konek with the Nanisiniq: Arviat History Project video: Why research? | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Curtis Konek, a young Inuit researcher with the Nanisiniq: Arviat History Project, shares his perspectives on the importance of the Nanisiniq project and its efforts to encourage young Inuit to learn and share traditional Inuit knowledge.

Young Arviat researcher Curtis Konek is one of the newest members of the Nanisiniq Arviat History Project. He's studying grade 11 and 12 at John Arnalukjuak High School and is fluent in both Inuktitut and English. In addition to his work with the Nanisiniq project, he's been a proud member of the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group in Arviat for the last two years. In June, he was promoted to the rank of Master Corporal.

The Sivulinuut Elders Society, Inuit youth and the University of British Columbia are working on a two year project which involves researching, writing, and filming the history of Arviat, Nunavut and the Kivalliq region from the Inuit point of view. Read more of their research, writings and videos on the Nanisiniq Project web site at: http://nanisiniq.tumblr.com

Follow Curtis' blog at curtiskuunuaq.tumblr.com
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Asbestos hypocrisy sticking to PM

Asbestos hypocrisy sticking to PM | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Opponents of Canadian asbestos exports say Ottawa's international stain is now being noticed at home.

[excerpt]

If Harper cannot be budged from his position, she maintains, Canadians are nothing but serfs in a dysfunctional democracy.

Questions in the House of Commons are now coming from NDP members from Quebec.

Last week, NDP MP Romeo Saganash reminded Industry Minister Christian Paradis that asbestos is being removed from MPs' offices and asked whether he would prefer to have the allegedly less carcinogenic chrysotile installed in his office.

“Or would he rather continue to export his hypocrisy to Third World countries?” Saganash asked.

Paradis repeated the government line that Canada has been promoting the safe and controlled use of chrysotile for 30 years.

The pummelling Canada has faced abroad is all in the aid of no more than 500 asbestos mining jobs left in Quebec.
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Ron Wassink: Spring Blooms On Arctic Tundra #Iqaluit, #Nunavut

Ron Wassink: Spring Blooms On Arctic Tundra #Iqaluit, #Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
[excerpt]

The challenge in photographing the arctic flora isn't that you can't find vegetation growing on the tundra, rather that plant and floral details are small. The second challenge in photographing arctic plant life is the ground is like a sponge. It's wet! I photographed most of the above plants in a prone position. I was soaked, but a photographer has to do what's necessary to capture the beauty of nature.
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Headlines for NWT News North for June 27th 2011

Headlines for NWT News North for June 27th 2011 | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
* Federal department changes name to be more politically correct. 'Indian' is out and 'aboriginal' is in; Northern leaders call it a step in the right direction
* Little girl recovers from final surgery. Family thankful for community support for daughter who was seriously burned
* Cooking for William and Kate. Hay River teen to help prepare food at Rideau Hall reception for prince and duchess
* Residential school survivors ready for national event. Truth of residential schools in North hoped to come out at national event
OPINION
* Communication saves lives. Faith must be restored in medical system after woman's untimely death
* Let's stop the rumours.
ENTERTAINMENT
* Artists come together in Fort Simpson. Open Sky Festival enters 11th year in community
SPORTS
* Bearathon hits the streets. Norman Wells Running Club hosts third annual foot races
BUSINESS
* Feds put $200,000 toward Nunavut tourism sector. Feasibility study for Kugluktuk visitors' centre among CanNor projects
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No commercial Arctic fishery until more is known, Canadians tell survey

No commercial Arctic fishery until more is known, Canadians tell survey | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
[excerpt]
"There will, in the not too distant future, be the opportunity for someone in a fishing boat to go in there," said Trevor Taylor of the environmental group Oceans North.
[...]
Taylor said his group commissioned the poll to highlight the need to protect Arctic fish before they start being commercially harvested.

"Somebody's got to get the discussion going," he said.

Northern fisheries are covered by international agreements in waters within the 200-mile limits of coastal nations. But High Arctic waters beyond those limits — such as those of the Canada Basin west of the Arctic islands — remain unregulated. No commercial fisheries now exist there.

The United States has ruled that no fishing will be allowed in its portion of the Beaufort Sea. The European Union, home to one of the world's biggest fishing fleets, has discussed a similar position.

But as stocks decline elsewhere in the oceans and climate change opens the Arctic, pressure will inevitably build.

"(Fishers) will go North as they exhaust fisheries resources elsewhere," said Michael Byers, an international law professor at the University of British Columbia.

"We don't know of any ships that are going into those waters, but one can certainly argue that there is time pressure if you want to get ahead of the problem. When you're talking about the opening up of any new region, there's a distinct advantage in having law arrive before the private actors do."

Some research suggests a High Arctic fishery is at least possible as species such as cod, crab and pollock migrate North as sea ice melts and water warms.

"Commercial fishing the Arctic may become economically viable," concludes a report on which the U.S. government based its Beaufort decision.

A report for the European Commission came to similar conclusions, while adding that changes will be difficult to predict.

"Arctic fisheries could lead to over-exploitation of target species," it said. "Such undesirable effects are without doubt already occurring."

A recent University of British Columbia study suggested that even fisheries in regulated Arctic waters have already caught 75 times more fish than have been reported to monitoring agencies.
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Women's Worlds 2011 interview: Mary Simon | rabble.ca

Women's Worlds 2011 interview: Mary Simon | rabble.ca | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Women's Worlds 2011 is a major international conference taking place in Ottawa-Gatineau from July 3 to 7, 2011. It is 'a global convergence to advance women's equality through research, exchange, leadership, and action' with speakers and performers from a diversity of backgrounds and countries. In the weeks before WW2011, interviews of some of the main participants will be published in rabble.ca. We are proud to be the exclusive online media sponsor.

At the Women's Worlds conference, Mary Simon will be discussing her personal journey to her current leadership position as well as challenges that women face in Inuit communities and the workforce. She will also be talking about some of the larger issues that Inuit people are facing today.

For more information on Women's Worlds 2011, click here for the website,
http://www.womensworlds.ca/
and here for the Facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/WW2011
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MiningWatch Canada raises social & environmental concerns about uranium mining in Nunavut

MiningWatch Canada raises social & environmental concerns about uranium mining in Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Photo:Two local men work at the fuel storage site at the proposed Kiggavik uranium mine, near Baker Lake, Nunavut in this undated handout photo. The trackless tundra reaches a fork in the road this weekend as environmental scrutiny begins on a massive uranium mine proposed for a pristine patch of the central Arctic.
( Photo:THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO )

AUDIO REPORT

MiningWatch Canada is criticising the review process for plans to develop a uranium mine near Baker Lake in Canada's northern Nunavut territory. The group says it's troubled that Inuit elders and hunters don't have access to all the information they need to give informed consent to Areva's Kiggavik project. However, AREVA Resources Canada insists that it is making every effort to address the concerns raised by the proposed Kiggavik uranium mining project near Baker Lake. Marc Montgomery speaks to Barry McCallum, AREVA's Manager of Nunavut Affairs.

Links:
- http://www.miningwatch.ca/
- Areva's Kiggavik blog
http://www.kiggavik.ca/
- Areva Kiggavik project overview
http://www.kiggavik.ca/project-overview/
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DONATE NOW: Using our Feet & our Hearts to Preserve Inuit Culture | Gjoa Haven #Nunavut

DONATE NOW: Using our Feet & our Hearts to Preserve Inuit Culture | Gjoa Haven #Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
$1812 to go — 9 days left to donate!
RAISED: $3188 NEEDED: $1812

Music. Dancing. Storytelling. Our 5-day Drum Dance Festival celebrates the diversity of our people, connects us to each other, our shared history and what makes us different. Help us preserve our stories and history.

Our project brings together elders and youth to share drumming and drum dancing for the largest drum dance in Nunavut. Our Inuit style is to learn by example, and we will celebrate all styles of drumming.

The Drum Dance Festival is a 5-day event in July, hosted in Gjoa Haven, a town of around just 1000 people, closer to Greenland than to Toronto. The festival will bring together 10 communities from across Nunavut. We will welcome 10 members from each community, including drummers, singers, a care person to support the elders and a delegation of youth.

Our Festival will include ongoing workshops where we all learn the songs from different communities, and share stories related to each drum dance. And each night, the drum dance becomes a community event, and is open to men, women and children from the community and nearby villages.

Your support empowers First Nations to come together and participate, and celebrate what we share and what makes us different. Yours is a gift to the retention of our First Nations culture, and an exchange of cultural knowledge.

Funds will be used for:
- Supporting drum dancers to cover the costs of the long distance travel across Nunuvut
- Honorariums for community members who will welcome strangers into their homes

We will open our homes and our hearts to this festival here in Gjoa Haven. Be part of our celebration by supporting the Drum Dance Festival and helping us preserve our unique First Nations culture for another generation.
Nunavut Aviuliqtiit

Drum dancing Society, Nunavut Aviuliqtiit. It has a series of objectives as a board/society, which include: a) to preserve and promote the Inuit drum dancing tradition throughout Nunavut, c) to educate and pass on the skill and knowledge of the drum dancing tradition and the songs sung
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An unlikely journey: Quebec to Resolute to Edmonton to find an Inuit home

An unlikely journey: Quebec to Resolute to Edmonton to find an Inuit home | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Sharon Brintnell arrived at the Fort Saskatchewan jail at 7:30 on a cold January night and three hours later was still waiting. The next day was her mother’s funeral; she had much on her mind. But first, there was Sam.

[excerpt]

Sam always called himself an Eskimo, a point of pride. That’s what his people were called in 1953, when the Canadian government took 19 families from their homes in northern Quebec and dropped them off 1,200 kilometres farther north at Resolute Bay and Grise Fjord. A second group was moved in 1955. Promises of a better life, more game for hunters, turned out to be false. Sam’s parents and older siblings were left in tents in a land of 24-hour darkness they’d never before experienced — at temperatures 20 degrees colder than they were used to. They almost starved the first winter.

A couple of years later, the government moved Sam’s family to Resolute, site of an RCMP station. In doing so, it broke a promise to the families that they could go back to their homes in Quebec if they wished.

Like many Inuit families in Resolute in the 1950s and 60s, Sam’s was hungry and destitute. Sam often described how his mother would go to the white man’s dump — as other families did — in search of for food but always were turned away by the RCMP.

Sam was born in 1965, into a complicated life.

[...]

---

To understand where Sam’s troubles began, you have to go to Resolute. It just so happens that someone from Edmonton met Sam there when he was 20 years old.

In 1986, Shannon Gadowksy was a University of Alberta student looking for adventure. She found a job in Resolute, NWT, a village of 110 people. Shannon worked for an outfitter who also ran a bed and breakfast and catered to North Pole expeditions and adventurers. Sam worked there too.

In the small village,­ almost entirely Inuit with less than a dozen white people, two cultures clashed. Sam’s generation still went out on the land hunting for weeks. When they returned, they would find pop and chips at the local Hudson Bay and frozen chickens at the co-op food store.

The RCMP was a constant presence, a force for stability and order but also to be feared when things got out of hand. Boredom was a big problem for young people, recalls Shannon, and boredom and booze were a bad mix.

She was also surprised to learn the depth of tribal divisions that plagued the community.

Sam grew up speaking and writing Inuktitut and later learned to read and write English. After a stint in residential high school, he returned to Resolute and did a variety of jobs. He ran the co-op store, worked at the weather station, took courses, took care of kids.

Sam loved going out on the land, and he filled his freezer with seal meat. He ate one meal a day and hacked off a piece of frozen fish in his freezer.

Shannon, training to be a dietitian, wanted to know how Sam navigated two worlds, to know everything about traditional diet and way of life. Sam was happy to explain.

Resolute was Canada’s most northerly international airport, so it was a key supply base and communications centre for polar expeditions. That year, there were three, including a French man, Jean-Louse Etienne who successfully completed a solo trip to the North Pole on skis. Media arrived in big numbers too.

Shannon, upset at one rather insensitive newspaper reporter, declared that her friend Sam would challenge this reporter to a game of Scrabble. “This won’t take long,” the reporter muttered, she recalled.

The Inuit handily beat the highly paid wordsmith, she recalled, and gracefully declined a rematch.

But the worst of western culture had quickly made its way north too. Drugs and alcohol took a terrible toll on village life, caused fights.

“We’d talk about the relocation a lot, it was the crux of so much in his life, the tribal warfare, the broken promises, the broken hearts of his parents,” she recalls.

At the end of the summer season, Shannon came back to Edmonton to finish her degree. But the two stayed in close touch for years through letters and phone calls.

Then, about ten years later, Sam had another drastic relocation — this time to Kingston penitentiary.

Read more: http://www.edmontonjournal.com/unlikely+journey+Quebec+Resolute+Edmonton+find+Inuit+home/5078587/story.html#ixzz1Ri3yNRpG

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New York Times Obituary: Edmund Carpenter, Archaelogist & Anthropologist

New York Times Obituary: Edmund Carpenter, Archaelogist & Anthropologist | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Edmund Carpenter, an archaeologist and anthropologist who, impatient with traditional boundaries between disciplines, did groundbreaking work in anthropological filmmaking and ethnomusicology and, with his friend Marshall McLuhan, laid the foundations of modern media studies, died on July 1 in Southampton, N.Y. He was 88. [excerpt]

At a time when few anthropologists showed much interest in the Arctic and its peoples, he embarked on a series of expeditions among the Aivilik people and published several books on the Inuit: “Time/Space Concepts of the Aivilik” (1955), “Anerca” (1959) and “Eskimo” (1959), republished as “Eskimo Realities” in 1973.

His interest in language and culture led him into a fruitful collaboration with McLuhan when both taught at the University of Toronto in the 1950s.

Together they organized the influential Seminar on Culture and Communication to discuss the role of radio, television, film and print in transforming human relations.

Mr. Carpenter took the lead in editing Explorations, the interdisciplinary journal that grew out of the seminar; it published writers like the anthropologist Dorothy Lee and the literary critic Northrop Frye.

In 1969, he and Ms. De Menil, a photographer whom he would later marry and a member of the family that founded the Menil Collection in Houston, went to Papua New Guinea to observe the effects of modern communications on tribal peoples. Invited by the Australian government, he accepted the post of research professor at the University of Papua New Guinea because it offered “an unparalleled opportunity to step in and out of 10,000 years of media history, observing, probing, testing,” he wrote in “Oh, What a Blow That Phantom Gave Me!” (1972), his best-known book. “I wanted to observe, for example, what happens when a person – for the first time – sees himself in a mirror, in a photograph, on films, hears his voice; sees his name.”

[...]

At the University of Toronto, where he began teaching in 1948, he became entranced by what he later called “the nonsensory spirit world of electronic media.”

His collaborations with McLuhan included numerous jointly written articles and the anthology “Explorations in Communication” (1960). The article “Fashion Is Language,” which appeared under McLuhan’s name in a special McLuhan issue of Harper’s Bazaar in 1968, was actually written by Mr.

Carpenter after McLuhan went into the hospital for brain surgery. It was published in book form, in 1970, under Mr. Carpenter’s name, with the title “They Became What They Beheld.”

Mr. Carpenter was deeply involved in the writing of “Understanding Media,” the book that made McLuhan an intellectual celebrity. It began as a collaboration, but Mr. Carpenter gradually withdrew and the book was published under McLuhan’s name alone. “I admired Marshall’s insights and style, but it simply wasn’t me,” Mr. Carpenter wrote to the anthropologists Harald E. L. Prins and John Bishop in 2002. The published work was a hybrid.

“The final version of ‘Understanding Media’ mixed both our contributions,” he wrote in a 2001 essay. “This partly explains its uneven tone.”

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Polar bears had Irish grizzly ancestor - Technology & Science - CBC News

Polar bears had Irish grizzly ancestor - Technology & Science - CBC News | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Based on the genetic sequences analyzed, modern polar bears were more closely related to Irish brown bears than ancient polar bears. (Canadian Press) [excerpt]

A female grizzly bear who lived in Ireland less than 50,000 years ago was an ancestor of all modern polar bears, suggesting grolar hybrids were an important part of polar bear history.

The unexpected DNA evidence suggests that interbreeding between polar bears and brown bears — usually known as grizzly bears in North America — is not unusual at times when climate change caused the range of the two species to overlap, such as around the beginning of the last ice age
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Keeping an ancient culture alive: One way is to save the stories.

Keeping an ancient culture alive: One way is to save the stories. | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
How do you save an ancient culture in today’s modern world?

One way is to save the stories.

As APTN National News reporter Wayne Rivers reports, a Nunavut based company says they are doing just that.
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New Northwest Passage triggers mass species migration

New Northwest Passage triggers mass species migration | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Warming oceans are triggering an enormous movement of marine species, say scientists, and could threaten North Atlantic fishing stocks.
Melting sea ice has opened up a new Northwest Passage across the pole, and already species are taking advantage of it.

Around 800,000 years ago, a tiny species of plankton called Neodenticula seminae vanished from the North Atlantic. But it's now back again, having drifted from the Pacific through the Arctic Ocean thanks to dramatically reduced polar ice.

"Such a geographical shift could transform the biodiversity and functioning of the Arctic and North Atlantic marine ecosystems," the Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science warns.

And, at the other end of the size scale, a Pacific gray whale was spotted last year off the coasts of Spain and Israel. Scientists believe the ice-reduced Arctic allowed it to cross into the North Atlantic, from where it wandered its way to the Mediterranean Sea.

The findings are included in a new catalog by project CLAMER, a collaboration of 17 marine institutes in 10 European countries which synthesizes the results of almost 300 EU-funded climate change-related research projects over 13 years.
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Filmmaker Phil Coates reviews his Arctic shoot with Canon HD camcorders

Filmmaker Phil Coates reviews his Arctic shoot with Canon HD camcorders | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
In his latest video blog for Canon Professional Network (CPN) intrepid cameraman, Phil Coates, reveals how Canon’s XF100 and XA10 HD camcorders stood up to shooting in the Arctic in extreme temperatures and delivers his thoughts about the...
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June 2011 EU-ARCTIC University of the Arctic - Newsletter available

June 2011 EU-ARCTIC  University of the Arctic - Newsletter available | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Wed, Jun 29, 2011
The new issue of the EU-ARCTIC Newsletter, about political developments in the Arctic from the perspective of Brussels, is now available.
Contents of this issue:
1. Editorial
2. Special Hint: Conference Series on ‘Sustainable Oceans: Reconciling Economic Use and Protection’
3. Presentation of online survey of the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik
4. Conference before the Nuuk Arctic Council Meeting in Stockholm on: The New Arctic: Building Cooperation in the Face of Emerging Challenges
5. Experiences from Cooperation in the European Arctic
6. Nordic Council of Ministers EU-seminar: "An Arctic Agenda"
7. Participation of the EU ARCTIC Forum in the Pan-Arctic Dialogue Program University of Bodø in March 2011
8. Arctic Conference opened by German Foreign Minister Westerwelle and Commissioner Damanaki in Berlin
9. The European Parliament Magazine had a special Issue on the Arctic
10. EU ARCTIC FORUM in the Barents-Saga
11. About us
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The Real Headlines for Nunavut News North for June 27th 2011

The Real Headlines for Nunavut News North for June 27th 2011 | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
* 'We need interpreters'. Lack of Inuit Sign Language interpreters affects access to education, justice and health care systems for Nunavut's hearing impaired
* DNA tests to identify victims. Gunshot wounds to the face left family's bodies 'beyond recognizable'
* Polar bear survey planned for fall. Hunters support effort to get up-to-date population numbers
* Siblings kite-ski the Northwest Passage. Iqaluit adventurers complete 3,300-km, 85-day trip
OPINION
* We can't afford more MLAs. Money would be better spent on more pressing needs
* Saving Canadian style.
ENTERTAINMENT
* Miss Nunavut. Iqaluit woman to represent the territory at Miss Canada International Competition
SPORTS
* Time to play ball. Iqaluit Slo-Pitch Association opens the curtain on 2011 season
BUSINESS
* Iqaluit Slo-Pitch Association opens the curtain on 2011 season. Iqaluit Slo-Pitch Association opens the curtain on 2011 season
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A crime-scene cleaner works in Iqaluit #Nunavut

A crime-scene cleaner works in Iqaluit #Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
An RCMP investigator examines the area in Iqaluit's cemetery where the body of a man was found alongside a shotgun Tuesday, June 7, 2011. (Photo: Nunatsiaq News-Chris Windeyer)

[excerpt]

In his three years on the job, Colterman has cleaned up after murders, suicides, grow-ops and a whole assortment of other misadventures that most only hear about in the news.

Colterman was in Iqaluit to clean up after an incident that left four people dead, but he wouldn't talk specifics for privacy reasons.

The tragedy made headlines nationally and crystallized the challenges facing northern towns such as Iqaluit, where unemployment, substance abuse and violence have left communities reeling.

According to news reports, Sylvain Degrasse, 44; Sula Enuaraq, 29; and daughters Alexandra and Aliyah, aged seven and two respectively, died of gunshot wounds. They were found June 7.

Though officials have not confirmed what exactly occurred, it's widely believed the case is a murder-suicide.

"If nothing bothers you, you're dead inside and you shouldn't be doing it at all," Colterman tells me, reflecting on the disturbing nature of the case, which unfolded at a family residence.

Only 18 hours before Colterman and his small team of two arrived to clean up the mess at the residence, police were still on the crime scene searching for evidence.

After working nearly around the clock for three days -- spurred on by the nearly 20 hours of Arctic summer sunshine -- the crew of three was nearly finished.

Still, it had been a grind: "There are so many ridiculous variables that you have to think about to make it doable," he said. Simple tasks like getting hold of supplies and regular items such as tissue paper can be tough in Iqaluit.

Due to the severity of the incident, in which all four family members died, and the remoteness of the location, the job had been among the toughest of Colterman's decade-long career.

Complicating matters, there was the problem of keeping a low-profile in a town where everyone knows everyone, and secrets don't last long.

"We're very particular about how we handle that stuff," Colterman said, adding that disposing of bio-waste from the scene requires the utmost discretion.

While the Iqaluit job had been difficult, Colterman spoke of a similarly disturbing scene while working in small-town Ontario.
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Peregrine Diamonds Identifies Three New Kimberlites at Chidliak Project on south Baffin Island #Nunavut

Peregrine Diamonds has discovered three new kimberlites, CH-56, CH-57 and CH-58 at the Chidliak project through drilling.

The location of the Chidliak project is on the south Baffin Island around 100 km northeast of Iqaluit in Canada. The company has identified eight kimberlites and has drilled 15 targets. It has examined 35 of the 58 kimberlites, which are found at Chidliak, for diamonds and seven kimberlites have mercantile diamond mining prospective in the Arctic locations. Peregrine has drilled a second core hole in the CH-55 kimberlite besides the three new discoveries. At present, a core rig has started drilling at CH-31 kimberlite and the other core rig at CH-33 kimberlite. The reverse circulation rig will continue to drill the priority targets.

The company will examine the reverse circulation drill cuttings from the CH-57 kimberlite and the drill core received from the CH-55, CH-56 and CH-58 kimberlites for diamonds at Saskatchewan Research Council Geoanalytical Laboratories using caustic fusion. It expects to receive the analytical results in the third quarter.

The location of the CH-56 kimberlite is about 1.6 km southwest of the Sunrise camp and has a predicted surface expression of a hectare depending on the ground geophysics interpretation and the drill cuts. The kimberlite CH-57 is situated 9 km east of the Sunrise camp and has an expected surface expression of 1.5 ha based on ground geophysical information. The CH-58 kimberlite is present around 20 km north of the kimberlite CH-6 and 300 m south of the kimberlite CH-55. The kimberlites CH-55 and CH-58 are calculated to be more than 0.5 ha in size based on drill and geophysical information.

Source: http://www.pdiam.com/
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MUMMIFIED FOREST UNCOVERED IN NUNAVUT

MUMMIFIED FOREST UNCOVERED IN NUNAVUT | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Marc Montgomery talks to Canadian research scientist Joel Barker who's found the most northerly mummified forest ever discovered. The preserved organic material from this ancient forest in Canada's Nunavut territory could help us understand how ecosystems adapt to climate change. ( Photo:Joel Barker/Ohio State University/Associated Press )

Website:

- http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2010/12/16/tech-arctic-trees-mummified-forest.html

Photo: An outcropping of mummified tree remains on Ellesmere Island in Nunavut. (Joel Barker/Ohio State University/Associated Press )
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Stolen Inuit remains returned to Labrador - North - CBC News

Stolen Inuit remains returned to Labrador - North - CBC News | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The remains of 22 Inuit removed them from gravesites in 1927 and taken to the Chicago Field Museum were reburied Wednesday at a ceremony in northern Labrador.
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