Inuit Nunangat St...
Follow
Find tag "Nunavut"
46.0K views | +0 today
Inuit Nunangat Stories
Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
Curated by Northern_Clips
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

"Vanishing Point" NFB documentary introduces audience to diverse northern cultures - Canadian Geographic

"Vanishing Point" NFB documentary introduces audience to diverse northern cultures - Canadian Geographic | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The film crew had been waiting weeks for the birds. A storm was breaking over their heads as they crouched high in the rocky tundra. The family they were filming expressed their impatience. Their kids ...
Northern_Clips's insight:

Stephen A. Smith and Julia Szucs tell the story of two Inuit communities in Nunavut and Greenland in the documentary Vanishing Point.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

The Inuit-language bible it took 34 years to translate is now available as an app

The Inuit-language bible it took 34 years to translate is now available as an app | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Last week, an Inuktitut option was added to a free bible app published by YouVersion.com, the online publishing arm of an Oklahoma-based megachurch
 10
Northern_Clips's insight:

"Plugging Inuktitut into the app took a bit longer than usual owing to the language’s unique alphabet, according to a report by the Iqaluit-based Nunatsiaq News. Inuktitut is one of 245 languages offered by the app."

"...

The Inuktitut Bible application can be downloaded for free on a number of devices, including computers, iPads, iPhones, iPods and android phones.

However, the app won’t work on older Blackberry smartphones, but it will work on computers and laptops...."

http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674app_developed_for_inuktitut_bible_download/

 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Tripping in Sanikiluaq Nunavut: Chilling in my crib

Tripping in Sanikiluaq Nunavut: Chilling in my crib | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

One winter I decided, in a fit of contrariness, to head north for a short vacation instead of to the sunny south. I ended up on Flaherty Island in the Belcher archipelago on a February night, sitting on a pile of caribou furs in an igloo chewing a piece of raw seal while a half-dozen Inuit women in parkas crowded in and started throat-singing.

 

 

Northern_Clips's insight:

Uploaded on Oct 25, 2011 These videos will give you an idea about life in the community... This http://youtu.be/fpbW7opprzo was one of the projects I worked on as editor when at Education Nunavut... In Arviat Nunavut. On Final Cut Pro...[English and Inuktitut http://youtu.be/f9cwScdbVAI versions] It is the story how a community worked together to get a daycare centre...
"Najuqsivik"
Project funding came from Health Canada
I produced it for Education Nunavut.
2001 PRODUCER / DIGITAL EDITING - "Saniqiluak Daycare Centre" a half hour documentary about how Saniqiluak, a Nunavut community of 700 people, has organized and run their daycare centre and its programs. English & Inuktitut versions

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Ron Wassink: My New Nunavut Plate Is Binary!

Ron Wassink: My New Nunavut Plate Is Binary! | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
 I went to the licence office in Iqaluit to pick up my new licence plate for my Ford pickup truck. I've been going to theoffice daily for the past month to check on numbers. I washoping to get 000999. I was a day late and ended up with001011. I'm happy, and lucky. My plate representscomputer binary code. I did an internet search to seeif 001011 translates to English. No luck yet. However,I am positive this licence plate is my lottery win. No onein the world will have a plate that's binary. Add to thatthe new plate is supposed to have 25 stars representingthe communities of Nunavut. I counted 18 on mine.
Northern_Clips's insight:

"...Nunavut became Canada's newest territory in 1999. The territory had an agreement with Northwest Territories to use the NWT polar bear plate, but that agreement expired and Nunavut had to design and develop its own licence plate. The Nunavut polar bear plate became extinct in July 2012....."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Harper's cabinet mulls massive Chinese resource project near Kugluktuk Nunavut in Arctic

Harper's cabinet mulls massive Chinese resource project near Kugluktuk Nunavut in Arctic | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Harper's cabinet mulls massive Chinese resource project in Arctic
 10
Northern_Clips's insight:

"...Some time in the new year, four federal ministers are to decide how to conduct an environmental review for the Izok Corridor proposal. It could bring many billions of dollars into the Arctic but would also see development of open-pit mines, roads, ports and other facilities in the centre of calving grounds for the fragile Bathurst caribou herd.
"This is going to be the biggest issue," said Sally Fox, a spokeswoman for proponent MMG Minerals, a subsidiary of the Chinese state-owned Minmetals Resources Ltd.
It would be hard to exaggerate the proposal's scope. Centred at Izok Lake, about 260 kilometres southeast of Kugluktuk, the project would stretch throughout a vast swath of western Nunavut.
Izok Lake would have five separate underground and open-pit mines producing lead, zinc and copper. Another site at High Lake, 300 kilometres to the northeast, would have another three mines.
MMG also wants a processing plant that could handle 6,000 tonnes of ore a day, tank farms for 35 million litres of diesel, two permanent camps totalling 1,000 beds, airstrips and a 350-kilometre all-weather road with 70 bridges that would stretch from Izok Lake to Grays Bay on the central Arctic coast....

"Both the Izok Lake mine site and the High Lake mine site, as well as the route of the Izok corridor all-weather road, occur either near to or on the Bathurst calving ground," wrote the government of the Northwest Territories.

"The proposed project may cause significant adverse effects on the ecosystem and wildlife habitat," wrote Environment Canada.

"We are concerned that our hunting and harvesting rights will be in jeopardy if the project is allowed to proceed as is," added the Lutsel K'e Dene.

Many pointed out that the Bathurst herd has only recently stabilized after a 90 per cent drop in the 1980s to today's 32,000 animals. That drop was steep and sustained enough for aboriginal groups to stop hunting the herd and many are leery of anything that could impede its recovery...."

 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Arviat Iglu Web Site

This web site from Arviat in Nunavut, northern Canada, details different aspects of traditional shelters such as the iglu. The project involved local Elders and youth working together using both traditional knowledge and modern technology. This is the second of the Arviat District Education Authority's projects designed to promote Inuktitut literacy and the use of syllabics. Many of those involved in the first project, Inuit Uqausingita Taiguusingit and some new individuals and organizations have worked together to make this second web site a great success.
Northern_Clips's insight:

This site has five different sections:
 

"...The Elders section includes nine interviews with Arviat elders. The interviews were conducted by two Qitiqliq High School students with questions from a young person's perspective on what life was like before Inuit started living in modern style housing. There are photographs, short biographies, and recordings of stories, ayaya songs and other shared experiences.The Levi Angmak Ilinniarvialaaq Iglu building project is a series of photo albums with accompanying text. The Iglu building project has been running for the past eight years. Students work with staff and Sivullinuut Elder's Society learning traditional skills like iglu building and preparation of skins.The Shelter section is on the different types of traditional shelters used in the region. Illustrations and text describe how each structure is situated, constructed and designed to meet the conditions of the changing seasons. There are video clips depicting the steps involved for the building of the winter iglu and the spring qarmaq iglu.The Places section uses maps, photos, and text to detail the region's traditional camping sites and transportation routes. The information gathered was done so through the knowledge and efforts of Arviat Elders and the Arviat Historical Society. Details on The Maguse River Place Names Project is presented in this section."..."

 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Simeonie Keenainak - Fiona's Wedding

Published on Aug 11, 2012 by Teirersias

On Nunavut Day July 9/2012 in Iqaluit famous Accordionist Simeonie Keenainik from Pangnirtung, Nunavut plays Fiona's Wedding. CTV's Canada AM was also broadcasting live from this event earlier in the day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Uranium Territory: Inuit campaign for referendum over mine in far north

Uranium Territory: Inuit campaign for referendum over mine in far north | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

[excerpt]

Writing for the Dominion, Warren Bernauer explores the issues surrounding Nunavut's pro-uranium stance and the grassroots effort to let the people, not the government, decide the future of uranium mining at Baker Lake.BAKER LAKE—A conflict over a uranium mine in the far north, four decades in the making, has pitted members of a small Inuit community against their territorial government and a French company.

Inuit in the community of Baker Lake, located west of Hudson Bay in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, have raised a hue over what they call a faulty, biased process and the Government of Nunavut's uncritical support for uranium mining.

John*, an Inuk from Baker Lake who spoke with The Dominion, said the Nunavut Government’s support for uranium mining was biased.

“The new government policy with regards to uranium, I think that’s biased,” he said. “Them knowing their own people don’t really want uranium mining and the impact it would have on the people. We’ve heard for years now the environmental impact it’s going to have in our community.”

He later commented, “I think there should be a ban on uranium mining...no uranium mining in Nunavut, period.”

Bill*, also an Inuk from Baker Lake, said that he was unsure whether or not the new policy truly reflects the opinions of Nunavummiut (“the people of Nunavut”).

“I think they should have held a [public] vote on the issue.”

Outrage over the government’s new policy has been expressed by Nunavummiut Makitagunarningit (Makita), (“The People of Nunavut Can Rise Up”), the region’s only environmental NGO, which called the process to develop the policy “biased” and “flawed.” High on the list of Makita’s complaints is the fact that the government relied on consultants with close ties to the uranium mining industry to develop its uranium policy.

[...]

In an e-mail to The Dominion, Makita member Jack Hicks took issue with the government policy’s assertion that uranium from Nunavut would only be used for “peaceful and environmentally responsible purposes.”

“We know where and how uranium from Nunavut could end up in nuclear weapons. Almost everyone I've ever spoken with—including people who are in favour of opening the territory to uranium mining—knows perfectly well that the [Government of Nunavut] and [Nunavut Tunngavik, Inc.] have zero control over how uranium will be used if it leaves the territory.”

“And given that the world has not found a way to safely store the highly radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, despite having spent countless billions of dollars trying, the idea that even non-military use of nuclear energy can be called 'environmentally responsible' is absurd,” Hicks said.

“What is tragically fascinating is that in a single generation the Inuit leadership has shifted from holding principled anti-nuclear positions (for example the Inuit Circumpolar Conference’s 1983 Resolution on a Nuclear Free Zone in the Arctic) to repeating the 'peaceful and environmentally responsible' lies of the politicians of the dominant society.”

[...]

*Due to the controversial nature of AREVA’s proposal, many people spoke under the condition of anonymity. In these cases, pseudonyms have been used.

Warren Bernauer is a graduate student at York University.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

RCMP Special Const. Andrew Ooyoumut of Baker Lake Nunavut honoured at RCMP national memorial service

[excerpts] RCMP Special Const. Andrew Ooyoumut once trekked through a blizzard to deliver supplies to starving Inuit families....

Ooyoumut, who was 37, drowned in the Kikatavyuk River in 1954 while helping to catch fish to feed RCMP sled dogs. ...

The North was always home for Ooyoumut.

Ooyoumut's granddaughter, Deborah Kigjugalik Webster, said he left a traditional, nomadic life to move into the new settlement of Baker Lake, in what was then Northwest Territories and is now Nunavut. He was hired by the RCMP in 1946.

Ooyoumut died July 21, 1954 — it was his eldest daughter's birthday. He left behind a wife and four children.

Webster never got a chance to meet her grandfather, but as a heritage specialist, she dug into his past, pouring over service records.

"I found out that as a special constable, he was working during the time of famine in the 1950s and some people remember him very well because in that time he brought supplies to them so that they wouldn't starve. He went to their camps and brought food supplies," Webster said.

"I've heard elders talking about that, that he was a very kind man that way.

"I know from reading the service file, he would even travel in bad weather and I remember his supervisor making note of that in the service file, saying that he travelled during a blizzard. Basically he was risking his own life to get the food to people who were starving."

Webster said special constables played an important role in helping the RCMP patrol the North. She said her grandfather had a lot of duties with the force, but was never properly acknowledged after his death.

She said she has been digging for access to information, "running into brick walls" and fighting for more than 15 years for recognition.

Webster's grandmother passed away a few years ago. But Webster, her mother, and two aunts will be at the ceremony at the RCMP training academy in Regina on Sunday wearing pukiliks — traditional clothing from Baker Lake that her grandmother made. She said it will be an important time for her family.

"It has been a long time coming," said Webster.

"For me when I hear Ooyoumut's name called out, I think that will be the most touching moment for me. For Ooyoumut to be finally honoured properly and shown the respect he deserves, it will mean a tremendous amount. To be there, too, with my mother and her two sisters is special because they lived without their father."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge

Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

t's common for one suicide to trigger another in Arctic communities, said Susan Aglukark, seen here in 2006. She will take part in a concert to mark World Suicide Prevention Day. Nathan Denette/Canadian Press

[excerpt]

Suicide is one of the last truly taboo topics, the shameful secret that few want to talk about and that silence can inadvertently lead to people taking their own lives.

Mental health advocates say that while the recent highly publicized suicides of several prominent sports figures have shone a spotlight on the issue, the lack of frank public discussion about causes and prevention is leaving those at risk for suicide and their loved ones as much in the dark as ever

[...]

Statistics show that suicide rates are five to seven times higher for First Nations and Inuit than for non-Aboriginal youth. Among Inuit youth alone, the suicide rate is 11 times the national average.

Aglukark said young people — among them children as young as 12 or 13 — are most at risk for taking their own lives for all the reasons "we hear about" — poverty, inadequate housing, substandard education, substance abuse, family violence, and the list goes on.

"It's very common for one suicide to trigger another, and to trigger another, in communities. They're so isolated, they're so far away," said the singer, who is also chair of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation, a group whose mandate is to improve the lives of young Aboriginals in Canada's North.

"I think part of the problem is they get caught up and stuck in the cycle of despair. How do you move on? How do you have closure when you're caught up in a constant, steady crisis?" Aglukark said.

"It's heartbreaking to know what needs to happen and to be powerless to see it happen fast enough."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Great Northern Canada Writing Contest Deadline September 2 #NWT #YUKON #NUNAVUT #NUNAVIK

Great Northern Canada Writing Contest Deadline September 2 #NWT #YUKON #NUNAVUT #NUNAVIK | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

To enter, submit a piece of prose, either fiction or non-fiction, of up to 1,000 words about life in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut or Nunavik. Previously published items or items that are submitted elsewhere are not eligible.

 Entries should be typed and double-spaced with the title, but not your name, on each numbered page. Please submit a separate cover sheet with your name, address, phone number, email address, word count and whether your piece is fiction or non-fiction.

 Entries must be mailed to:

Great Northern Canada Writing Contest,Box 1256,Yellowknife NT X1A 2N9

Or emailed as a WORD attachment to: info@northwordsnwt.ca with CONTEST ENTRY in the subject line.

Northern_Clips's insight:

To enter, submit a piece of prose, either fiction or non-fiction, of up to 1,000 words about life in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut or Nunavik. Previously published items or items that are submitted elsewhere are not eligible.

 Entries should be typed and double-spaced with the title, but not your name, on each numbered page. Please submit a separate cover sheet with your name, address, phone number, email address, word count and whether your piece is fiction or non-fiction.

 Entries must be mailed to:

Great Northern Canada Writing Contest,Box 1256,Yellowknife NT X1A 2N9

Or emailed as a WORD attachment to: info@northwordsnwt.ca with CONTEST ENTRY in the subject line.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Nunavut boards say they can’t pay for Bill C-47 obligations

Nunavut boards say they can’t pay for Bill C-47 obligations | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

[excerpt] A Conservative bill aimed at implementing part of the Nunavut land claims agreement can’t work unless the Nunavut Impact Review Board and the Nunavut Planning Commission get more funding, board officials told a House of Commons committee in Ottawa recently.

“First, with the level of development that we are currently experiencing in Nunavut, the Nunavut Impact Review Board’s core capacity is already stretched to the breaking point,” the NIRB’s chair Elizabeth Copland told MPs Jan. 29.

The bill, which the Tories are marketing politically as the “Nunavut Jobs and Growth Act,” is mostly aimed at setting out detailed rules and procedures for the review board and the planning commission.

Most of it is taken from an earlier bill called the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act, which died on the order paper just before the May 2011 election.

The aboriginal affairs committee finished looking at the Bill C-47 Feb. 12, when the Tory majority voted down a number of NDP and Liberal amendments.

But before that, witnesses from the NIRB and NPC said their organizations don’t get enough money from Ottawa each year to pay for the bill’s new requirements.

 10
Northern_Clips's insight:

“First, with the level of development that we are currently experiencing in Nunavut, the Nunavut Impact Review Board’s core capacity is already stretched to the breaking point,” the NIRB’s chair Elizabeth Copland told MPs Jan. 29.

 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

On the ‘itch or, the politics of bingo in Arviat, Nunavut

On the ‘itch or, the politics of bingo in Arviat, Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Boredom generates habits meant to replace the feeling of purposelessness. Habits become ingrained and can take many forms. Most pastimes in Arviat revolve predominantly around hunting, sewing, attending church, socializing, and last, but not least, Bingo jackpots. People play bingo to entertain, fundraise, socialize but, ultimately, they play to win. Isolation is a choice, especially when you live in a remote place where the sun is on vacation and the moon can feel like your only light in January. There is a legitimate argument here for why you would freeze your eyelashes off to walk to a friend’s place to play radio bingo in the dead of winter: self preservation. Anything to get the blood flowing. A racing heart when you’re “on the ‘itch” is one way of getting warmed up in these subzero temperatures. Some believe in good luck and the rest, determination. Whatever our beliefs, we all need something to do and be a part of.
Northern_Clips's insight:
"...Which is the lesser of two evils: taking away funding opportunities for groups that clearly bring people together and possibly save lives, or providing more ways for people to blow their money?..."
more...
Shawnee Rivers's curator insight, March 28, 2014 10:33 PM

People often downplay the social aspects of gaming and gambling, but they do exist.

Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Acclaimed Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook's life again runs off rails again

Acclaimed Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook's life again runs off rails again | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
They came to this newspaper last July, looking for help because a baby was on the way and they needed their own place after living outdoors and in shelters for more than a year.
 10
Northern_Clips's insight:

"...on Friday, outside the Ottawa Mission where she often goes for meals, Pootoogook revealed she is through with Watt and expects she will never be reunited with her baby. Pootoogook thinks the child will be put up for adoption. She also admitted the drinking never stopped, and both she and Watt continued to take drugs.

The story gets worse.

Earlier this month, as they were drinking red wine in their apartment, Watt suddenly flew into a drunken rage and beat her up.

Watt was sentenced to 45 days in jail for assault, and though police would not identify the victim, Pootoogook says it was her. Pootoogook says he punched her in the face at least six times and knocked her unconscious. A neighbour who heard the ruckus called police. She says she came to when they arrived. Blood was streaming from her nose. Police had her examined in hospital. Friends and a relatives who saw Pootoogook a few weeks ago say she had at least one black eye and other facial bruises...."

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Adami+Acclaimed+Inuit+artist+life+again+runs+rails/7754420/story.html#ixzz2GW81isRU 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

EXTREME Paramotor Trip of a Lifetime

RS Ultra sponsored paramotor trip to Northern Canada shows off some crazy scenery using a protoype Kangook paramotor. Grise Fiord, Nunavut, CANADA- August 2010
 10
Northern_Clips's insight:

EXTREME Paramotor Trip of a Lifetime

from RSUltra - Kangook Team Plus1 year ago

RS Ultra sponsored paramotor trip to Northern Canada shows off some crazy scenery using a protoype Kangook paramotor.

Grise Fiord, Nunavut, CANADA- August 2010

 10
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Muskox on the menu as Nunavut encourages return to traditional foods

Muskox on the menu as Nunavut encourages return to traditional foods | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Muskox on the menu as Nunavut encourages return to traditional foods

The government is subsidizing hunters to return to the land

by Jonathon Gatehouse on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 10:20am

[excerpt]

In Canada’s Far North, where two litres of milk can cost $14, a bag of flour $33, and 10 pieces of fried chicken $61.99, the government of Nunavut thinks a better future might lie in the past. So it has launched a program encouraging residents to follow the example of their ancestors and live off the land, harvesting more traditional “country food” like seal, muskox and even ground squirrel. “It’s partly for reasons of cost, and it’s partly for reasons of nutrition,” says Ed McKenna, director of the territory’s Anti-Poverty Secretariat. “But it’s also related to culture. For many people it’s their preferred food.”

And more to the point, it’s a straightforward solution to one of Nunavut’s most persistent social ills: hunger. A 2010 McGill University study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal estimated that nearly 70 per cent of preschoolers in the territory live in “food insecure” households, where there is not enough—or sometimes anything at all—to eat. Another survey, undertaken by the federal government, found that half of 11- to 15-year-olds in Nunavut reported sometimes going hungry. “The numbers are pretty stark,” says McKenna. “It’s a major issue.”

The Country Food Distribution Program is providing close to $4 million in funding over three years to help isolated municipalities feed themselves. Grants are available to help establish or upgrade community freezers, or set up local fresh-kill markets. But so far, the most popular aspect of the plan has been the direct subsidies—up to $10,000—for large-scale hunts. Last year, 14 of the territory’s 25 settlements took advantage of the cash, which is earmarked for basic supplies. “Harvesting has become more dependent on Ski-Doos, so you’re talking about the gas, as well as the cost of firearms and bullets, and then food and other equipment,” says McKenna. “It’s the kind of expense that’s beyond the reach of many, many people now.”

[...]

McKenna says the government is mindful of the need to avoid creating new problems as they search for solutions to existing challenges. “We don’t want to be encouraging people to do something that’s not going to be in their benefit in the long run.” More studies will be undertaken, and there are no plans to commercialize the hunts and start exporting fish and game outside the territory. “The focus is poverty reduction,” he says. “So it’s not a large program, but it can have a pretty good impact.”..."

 

 

more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:04 PM

In Nunavut, a politically autonomous nation in northern Canada. People are urging a shift in consumption to deal with the concerns of food insecure households. In this region two liters of milk can cost more than 14 dollars, a bag of flour can cost 33 dollars, and people are in need of alternative food sources because they can not afford buying food from the supermarket. Economic geography is causing a shift in consumption patterns in Nunavut. The Country food Distribution Program is providing close to $4 million in funding for isolated municipalities to feed themselves. This money is being spend on large scale hunts, community freezers and local fresh kill markets. Furthermore, the methods of harvesting rely on machinery that needs gas and maintenance like snowmobiles. A revert back to more traditional hunting and gathering methods have become necessary for the people in Nunavut to survive.

Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Arctic Bay Nunavut teen enjoying time in Guelph-Eramosa Township

Arctic Bay Nunavut teen enjoying time in Guelph-Eramosa Township | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Host family - Nick Muckpa, bottom right, is visiting from Arctic Bay, Nunavut and staying with the Thomsen family in Guelph-Eramosa Township, including parents Mark and Susan and sons Brian and Michael. Joining Muckpa is fellow Nunavut visitor Bernard Angootealuk, bottom centre.

[excerpt]

It took him a while, but Nick Muckpa is finally acclimatized to the weather in southern Ontario.

The 19-year-old resident of Arctic Bay, Nunavut says he sweat profusely during the first few days of his stay in the area, which was made possible through the federal Northern Youth Abroad program.

“I don’t want to leave this place,” Muckpa said, joking that he’s likely to catch a cold upon his return home, where the highest summer temperature is about 15 degrees Celsius and winter lows can reach -70 with the wind chill.

Muckpa told the Advertiser he is enjoying his stay with hosts Mark and Susan Thomsen of Guelph-Eramosa and also his work placement with the township’s parks and recreation department.

“The experience here is pretty good. I’ve learned a lot,” said Muckpa, who is fluent in English though his first language is Inuktitut.

Parks and recreation manager Robin Milne said he didn’t hesitate when asked about a job for Muckpa.

“I thought it would be a good opportunity for us and for Nick as well,” Milne said. He added Muckpa is learning a lot about life in the area, and likewise, his co-workers are learning about life in one of Canada’s most northern communities.

In addition to the climate, Muckpa cites several other big differences between the two areas.

“I had never seen a stranger for 19 years,” he said with a smile. According to the 2011 Census, the population of Arctic Bay was 823, and Muckpa said everyone there knows each other.

Yet despite the culture shock, particularly during visits to Ottawa and Toronto, Muckpa said his stay in Guelph-Eramosa has helped dispel some of the misconceptions he had about southern Ontario.

He was expecting to see very few trees but lots of huge buildings, and he also expected to witness a lot of violence, “But it’s not really like that.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

The evolution of entrepreneurship in Arviat: the southernmost community of mainland Nunavut

This article reports on research conducted in Arviat, describing the community from its establishment as the settlement of Eskimo Point, to this day. Methodology included the review of 100 relevant scholarly works. In Arviat, today, Inuit are actively participating as entrepreneurs in the formal economy, suggesting a new trend, quite different from the situation that existed a generation ago. The research suggests that attitudes toward enterprising and entrepreneurship evolve over time.

Arviat; Eskimo Point; Nunavut; Inuit; Kivalliq; Paallirmiut; Caribou Inuit; entrepreneurship; entrepreneurs; indigenous peoples.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Inuit snow goggles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Inuit snow goggles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Snow goggles (Inuktitut; ilgaak, syllabics; ᐃᓪᒑᒃ; Kivalliq dialect: iggaak ᐃᒡᒑᒃ; North Baffin dialect are a type of eyewear traditionally used by the Inuit people of the Arctic to prevent snow blindness. The goggles are traditionally made of a piece of bone or ivory pierced with slits but new ones may be made with wood.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Higher Latitudes a blog from #Nunavut

Higher Latitudes a blog from #Nunavut | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
I often hear people of all walks of life that live in Nunavut use the phrase ‘Only in the north’ or ‘Only in Nunavut’. It is almost always in reference to a negative situation or experience. I hear it in response to high prices, lack of quality service in terms of repair and maintenance, and often in reference to the maniacal crimes and situations caused by the debauchery of the citizens of Nunavut. Certainly due to our lack of road infrastructure there are times when need cannot be reached by supply. This does not mean that the level of service or quality of work should be diminished further since we are facing these challenges from the get-go.
more...
No comment yet.