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Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
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Tukisiviit — Do You Understand? Pauktuutit’s newest sexual health resource for Inuit.

Tukisiviit — Do You Understand? Pauktuutit’s newest sexual health resource for Inuit. | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Tukisiviit: Do You Understand? is Pauktuutit’s newest sexual health resource for Inuit. It is intended to provide Inuit patients and caregivers, as well as health care professionals, plain language information in English and five major dialects of Inuktitut.

Effective communication between patients and health care providers may be challenging if not impossible where there are cultural and language barriers. Health programs and services must address language as well as cultural competency, ensuring accurate communication and understanding of information in Inuktitut as well as English. Within Inuit Nunangat, the Inuktitut language is a family of dialects that varies from region to region and sometimes from community to community. The Inuktitut language is strong and is widely used by Inuit in their homes and communities.

The Tukisiviit National Inuit Sexual Health Literacy Forum held in Happy Valley –Goose Bay in February 2012, brought together linguistic experts from all regions, sexual health content experts, community health and social service providers, AIDS service organizations, land claims organization representatives, educators, elders and youth, with focus on addressing the lack of sexual health and HIV/AIDS terminology and the unique differences of dialects in Inuit regions. Through this forum, Tukisiviit – Do You Understand? was developed.

Pauktuutit encourages Inuit and health service providers to use this glossary of terms to improve communication and understanding of sexual health terms.

This glossary will be a living document. Your feedback is one way for us to continuously add to the glossary

 

 

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Tukisiviit: Do You Understand? is Pauktuutit’s newest sexual health resource for Inuit. It is intended to provide Inuit patients and caregivers, as well as health care professionals, plain language information in English and five major dialects of Inuktitut.

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New Ottawa Amaujaq National Centre for Inuit Education school plans Inuktitut standardization

New Ottawa Amaujaq National Centre for Inuit Education school plans Inuktitut standardization | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Inuit education is about to undergo a sea change, including the standardization of Inuktitut writing, as the group tackling the challenge opened their home base in Ottawa Tuesday.
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"....“Standardization of the Inuit writing system is not as easy as it sounds,” said national Inuit leader Terry Audla, president of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, which represents Canada’s four Inuit regions. “In communities impacted by the resource boom, there are shortages of qualified workers. Too many young people are not graduating. We know that we have to educate our way to prosperity.” Audla spoke at the opening of the Amaujaq National Centre for Inuit Education, a new Ottawa-based group tasked with putting to practice a list of 10 recommendations to improve Inuit education drawn up in 2008 under the National Strategy on Inuit Education...." Related Links: Inuit health group is giving voice and vocabulary to sex terms in Inuktitut - Suicide drives high death rates among Inuit kids -

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National Inuit org puts out “compendium of Inuit ideas”

National Inuit org puts out “compendium of Inuit ideas” | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Terry Audla, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, released what his organization calls a “compendium of Inuit ideas” and attitudes Jan. 29 at a big academic conference on Arctic security and sovereignty. The Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program’s third annual conference, this year called “Arctic Peoples and Security,” is taking place at the University of Toronto until Jan. 30. The Inuit ideas produced by the Nilliajut Project, or “to speak up, speak out,” are contained in a 76-page anthology of essays written mostly by Inuit describing Inuit perspectives on security, patriotism and sovereignty.
Northern_Clips's insight:
The project is produced by Inuit Qaujisarvingat: The Inuit Knowledge Centre, along with the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation and the Canada Center for Global Security Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. Based in Ottawa inside the ITK offices, Inuit Qaujisarvingat is set up to promote Inuit involvement in research that leads to better research, science and policy decision-making.
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Acclaimed Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook's life again runs off rails again

Acclaimed Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook's life again runs off rails again | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
They came to this newspaper last July, looking for help because a baby was on the way and they needed their own place after living outdoors and in shelters for more than a year.
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"...on Friday, outside the Ottawa Mission where she often goes for meals, Pootoogook revealed she is through with Watt and expects she will never be reunited with her baby. Pootoogook thinks the child will be put up for adoption. She also admitted the drinking never stopped, and both she and Watt continued to take drugs.

The story gets worse.

Earlier this month, as they were drinking red wine in their apartment, Watt suddenly flew into a drunken rage and beat her up.

Watt was sentenced to 45 days in jail for assault, and though police would not identify the victim, Pootoogook says it was her. Pootoogook says he punched her in the face at least six times and knocked her unconscious. A neighbour who heard the ruckus called police. She says she came to when they arrived. Blood was streaming from her nose. Police had her examined in hospital. Friends and a relatives who saw Pootoogook a few weeks ago say she had at least one black eye and other facial bruises...."

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Adami+Acclaimed+Inuit+artist+life+again+runs+rails/7754420/story.html#ixzz2GW81isRU 10
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Arviat Iglu Web Site

This web site from Arviat in Nunavut, northern Canada, details different aspects of traditional shelters such as the iglu. The project involved local Elders and youth working together using both traditional knowledge and modern technology. This is the second of the Arviat District Education Authority's projects designed to promote Inuktitut literacy and the use of syllabics. Many of those involved in the first project, Inuit Uqausingita Taiguusingit and some new individuals and organizations have worked together to make this second web site a great success.
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This site has five different sections:
 

"...The Elders section includes nine interviews with Arviat elders. The interviews were conducted by two Qitiqliq High School students with questions from a young person's perspective on what life was like before Inuit started living in modern style housing. There are photographs, short biographies, and recordings of stories, ayaya songs and other shared experiences.The Levi Angmak Ilinniarvialaaq Iglu building project is a series of photo albums with accompanying text. The Iglu building project has been running for the past eight years. Students work with staff and Sivullinuut Elder's Society learning traditional skills like iglu building and preparation of skins.The Shelter section is on the different types of traditional shelters used in the region. Illustrations and text describe how each structure is situated, constructed and designed to meet the conditions of the changing seasons. There are video clips depicting the steps involved for the building of the winter iglu and the spring qarmaq iglu.The Places section uses maps, photos, and text to detail the region's traditional camping sites and transportation routes. The information gathered was done so through the knowledge and efforts of Arviat Elders and the Arviat Historical Society. Details on The Maguse River Place Names Project is presented in this section."..."

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The Daily — Health Indicators for the Inuit Nunangat regions, 2004 to 2008

Health indicators for the Inuit Nunangat regions based on Vital Statistics data for 2004 to 2008 are now available.
Northern_Clips's insight:

Search results from within CANSIM tables 

Low birth weight babies (500 to less than 2,500 grams), by sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years,  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

Live births and infant mortality, by sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years,  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

Perinatal mortality, by sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years,  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

Mortality, by selected causes of death (ICD-10) and sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years,  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

Potential years of life lost, by selected causes of death (ICD-10) and sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years,  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

Life expectancy, at birth and at age 65, by sex, five-year average, Canada and Inuit regions, every 5 years (Years),  1994/1998 to 2004/2008

 

For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; infostats@statcan.gc.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; mediahotline@statcan.gc.ca).

 

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Super Shamou comic book PDF Inuit Broadcasting Corporation

Super Shamou comic book PDF Inuit Broadcasting Corporation | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

http://www.inuitbroadcasting.ca/grfx/kids/Shamou_e.pdf

 

Super Shamou is the world's first Inuk super hero, chosen to provide peace and justice to the people of the Arctic.

Biography

Peter was a mild mannered Inuk until he was visited one night by a spirit that informed him he had been chosen to provide peace and justice to the people of the Arctic, then gave him a charm of great power that transformed him into Super Shamou. He protects the wilderness of Canada, looking out for unwary travellers who fall foul of the unforgiving conditions, and children in particular. As well as rescuing such individuals, he also makes sure to teach them some realities of life in the North.

http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/s/supshamo.htm

 

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The evolution of entrepreneurship in Arviat: the southernmost community of mainland Nunavut

This article reports on research conducted in Arviat, describing the community from its establishment as the settlement of Eskimo Point, to this day. Methodology included the review of 100 relevant scholarly works. In Arviat, today, Inuit are actively participating as entrepreneurs in the formal economy, suggesting a new trend, quite different from the situation that existed a generation ago. The research suggests that attitudes toward enterprising and entrepreneurship evolve over time.

Arviat; Eskimo Point; Nunavut; Inuit; Kivalliq; Paallirmiut; Caribou Inuit; entrepreneurship; entrepreneurs; indigenous peoples.

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RCMP Special Const. Andrew Ooyoumut of Baker Lake Nunavut honoured at RCMP national memorial service

[excerpts] RCMP Special Const. Andrew Ooyoumut once trekked through a blizzard to deliver supplies to starving Inuit families....

Ooyoumut, who was 37, drowned in the Kikatavyuk River in 1954 while helping to catch fish to feed RCMP sled dogs. ...

The North was always home for Ooyoumut.

Ooyoumut's granddaughter, Deborah Kigjugalik Webster, said he left a traditional, nomadic life to move into the new settlement of Baker Lake, in what was then Northwest Territories and is now Nunavut. He was hired by the RCMP in 1946.

Ooyoumut died July 21, 1954 — it was his eldest daughter's birthday. He left behind a wife and four children.

Webster never got a chance to meet her grandfather, but as a heritage specialist, she dug into his past, pouring over service records.

"I found out that as a special constable, he was working during the time of famine in the 1950s and some people remember him very well because in that time he brought supplies to them so that they wouldn't starve. He went to their camps and brought food supplies," Webster said.

"I've heard elders talking about that, that he was a very kind man that way.

"I know from reading the service file, he would even travel in bad weather and I remember his supervisor making note of that in the service file, saying that he travelled during a blizzard. Basically he was risking his own life to get the food to people who were starving."

Webster said special constables played an important role in helping the RCMP patrol the North. She said her grandfather had a lot of duties with the force, but was never properly acknowledged after his death.

She said she has been digging for access to information, "running into brick walls" and fighting for more than 15 years for recognition.

Webster's grandmother passed away a few years ago. But Webster, her mother, and two aunts will be at the ceremony at the RCMP training academy in Regina on Sunday wearing pukiliks — traditional clothing from Baker Lake that her grandmother made. She said it will be an important time for her family.

"It has been a long time coming," said Webster.

"For me when I hear Ooyoumut's name called out, I think that will be the most touching moment for me. For Ooyoumut to be finally honoured properly and shown the respect he deserves, it will mean a tremendous amount. To be there, too, with my mother and her two sisters is special because they lived without their father."

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Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge

Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

t's common for one suicide to trigger another in Arctic communities, said Susan Aglukark, seen here in 2006. She will take part in a concert to mark World Suicide Prevention Day. Nathan Denette/Canadian Press

[excerpt]

Suicide is one of the last truly taboo topics, the shameful secret that few want to talk about and that silence can inadvertently lead to people taking their own lives.

Mental health advocates say that while the recent highly publicized suicides of several prominent sports figures have shone a spotlight on the issue, the lack of frank public discussion about causes and prevention is leaving those at risk for suicide and their loved ones as much in the dark as ever

[...]

Statistics show that suicide rates are five to seven times higher for First Nations and Inuit than for non-Aboriginal youth. Among Inuit youth alone, the suicide rate is 11 times the national average.

Aglukark said young people — among them children as young as 12 or 13 — are most at risk for taking their own lives for all the reasons "we hear about" — poverty, inadequate housing, substandard education, substance abuse, family violence, and the list goes on.

"It's very common for one suicide to trigger another, and to trigger another, in communities. They're so isolated, they're so far away," said the singer, who is also chair of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation, a group whose mandate is to improve the lives of young Aboriginals in Canada's North.

"I think part of the problem is they get caught up and stuck in the cycle of despair. How do you move on? How do you have closure when you're caught up in a constant, steady crisis?" Aglukark said.

"It's heartbreaking to know what needs to happen and to be powerless to see it happen fast enough."

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Nunavik org honours late Inuit singer Charlie Adams and acts of bravery at AGM

Nunavik org honours late Inuit singer Charlie Adams and acts of bravery at AGM | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

In Kangiqsujuaq, Elsie Adams, the widow of the late singer and songwriter Charlie Adams, received a special lifetime award for her late husband’s contributions.

Adams died five years ago at the age of 55.

A pioneer in the development of recorded Inuktitut pop music, Adams played at numerous music festivals throughout the eastern Arctic over his 30-year career. He also toured in the United States and in Europe.

As a singer and guitarist, Adams was always generous with his talents. His most famous song: the cheerful “Quviasupunga” (I’m Happy).

In July 2004, Adams suffered a near-fatal accident when a car drove over him while he lay in a Montreal alley, and he never fully recovered from his injuries.

A video tribute to Adams was shown before Elsie Adams accepted the award, which reads, “thank you for all of your beautiful songs that touched our lives and the inspiration they bring to Inuit today and tomorrow.”

 

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The late Charlie Adams sits next to his wife Elsie in a photo taken by Charlie’s friend George Lessard, who visited the couple at the ­Montreal General Hospital in 2004. (FILE PHOTO)

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Nilliajut Project Explores Inuit Perspectives on Security, Patriotism and Sovereignty | Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami - Canada's National Inuit Organization

National Inuit Leader Terry Audla, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK), released a compendium of Inuit ideas and attitudes towards Arctic security and sovereignty today during the Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program’s third annual conference, “Arctic Peoples and Security.”

Nilliajut (to speak up, speak out) is the title of a film and companion text produced by Inuit Qaujisarvingat: The Inuit Knowledge Centre (IQ) in collaboration with the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation and the Canada Center for Global Security Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

The project explores the multifaceted views of security, patriotism and sovereignty in the Arctic through the eyes of established and emerging Inuit leaders and thinkers, including Pujjuut Kusugak of Rankin Inlet, Myrna Pokiak of Tuktoyaktuk, and Rosemarie Kuptana of Sachs Harbour, who participated in a panel discussion during the conference.

“Inuit have played our part in asserting the sovereign rights of Canada in the Arctic,” said Audla, who appears in the film and contributed a manuscript to the collection of papers. “These rights are founded on the bedrock of Inuit use and occupation of Arctic lands and waters.”

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The video Nilliajut: Inuit Voices on Security, and edited volume Nilliajut: Inuit Perspectives on Security, Patriotism and Sovereignty are available at http://www.inuitknowledge.ca

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Royal Canadian Mint Honours Canadian Inuit Art With Joannassie Nowkawalk Owl Shaman Fine Gold Coin

Royal Canadian Mint Honours Canadian Inuit Art With Joannassie Nowkawalk Owl Shaman  Fine Gold Coin | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Today at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Royal Canadian Mint unveiled a 99.99% fine gold collector coin with a 50-cent face value honouring Canadian Inuit Art.

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"The Royal Canadian Mint is proud to celebrate Canada's history, culture and values with special collector coins," said Ian E. Bennett, President and CEO of the Royal Canadian Mint. "This gold coin honours Canadian Inuit art through an intricate design inspired by the original carving of Inuit artist Joannassie Nowkawalk, Owl Shaman holding Goose, part of the Winnipeg Art Gallery's world-class contemporary Inuit art collection."

The coin's reverse design of the owl's round and compact shape conveys the solid physique, adaptations and strength that are essential to surviving in the Arctic while the captured goose reveals the owl's prowess as a hunter.

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Inside the life of the Inuit: Extraordinary photographs document how Alaska's Eskimos survived some of the world's coldest winters

Inside the life of the Inuit: Extraordinary photographs document how Alaska's Eskimos survived some of the world's coldest winters | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Photographed between 1909 and 1932, the collection offers a rare glimpse in the natives' everyday life from hunting polar bears, to building igloos, to their personal dwellings inside.

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"... An extraordinarily collection of rarely seen photographs capturing Alaska's Eskimos document the hard but persevering survival of the people commonly known as the hunters of the Arctic.

Photographed between 1909 and 1932, the collection offers a rare glimpse in the natives' everyday life from hunting polar bears, to building igloos, to their personal dwellings inside.

Standing with bow and arrows and hand, a hunter photographed in 1924 proudly poses before his kill of a massive polar bear, resting more than twice his size along the snow, arrows protruding from its chest.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2253029/Historic-photographs-document-Alaskas-Inuit-Eskimos-survived-worlds-coldest-winters.html#ixzz2G6BK4M1H
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter ...."
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Nunatsiavut government Inuit Sign MOU with Chicago Museum

Nunatsiavut government Inuit Sign MOU with Chicago Museum | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
The Nunatsiavut government has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago to right some historic wrongs and build a better relationship. The Field Museum has had a long historic connection with the Labrador Inuit, dating back to the late 1800's.
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"...In 1893 a number of Labrador Inuit were recruited to participate in the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, during which time they were displayed as human 'curiosities'. In the 1920s, the remains of a number of Inuit were removed from marked graves at Zoar and brought to the Field Museum for research. Those remains were repatriated last summer during an emotional ceremony involving the descendants of those whose resting places were disturbed. The new MOU will help build a positive relationship and enable research opportunities and collaborative exhibits involving shared learning. The MOU was signed via video conferencing at Jens Haven Memorial School in Nain, and witnessed by the school's Newfoundland and Labrador Studies class. ..."

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Chronicling the War of Nature vs. Greed: A Review of "Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point"

Chronicling the War of Nature vs. Greed: A Review of "Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point" | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

The collected essays of Native Alaskans, environmental activists, scientists and researchers form a counternarrative to Big Oil's PR blitz in the increasingly polluted Northern Hemisphere.
[excerpt]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012

http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices

According to editor Subhankar Banerjee, "the Arctic is warming at a rate double that of the rest of the planet." This, of course, has already had a discernible impact on the animals, fish and people of the region - and beyond. As rising temperatures have put many scientists and everyday folks on high alert, they are increasingly primed for battle against profit-hungry corporations and the drill-baby-drill crowd, who see the Arctic's immense stock of coal, oil and other natural resources as a tremendous boon - environment be damned.

The 31 essays in "Arctic Voices" contest this destructive greed. Some focus on the indigenous cultures that stand to be eradicated by the folly of energy companies; others address the visible destruction of the lands and waters of Alaska, Russia, Iceland and Greenland. Dozens of photos - both black-and-white and color - hammer the realities of contamination and pollution. It's a sobering read, especially for urban dwellers whose existence is far removed from the subsistence lifestyle of the Gwich'in, Inupiat and Inuit people.

"We're all connected to the northern hemisphere," Banerjee writes in an introduction to the volume: "

Hundreds of millions of birds migrate to the Arctic each spring from every corner of the earth - including Yellow Wagtail from Kolkata - for nesting and rearing their young and resting - a planetary celebration of global interconnectedness. On the other hand, caribou, whale and fish migrate hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles, connecting numerous indigenous communities through subsistence food harvests - local and regional interconnectedness. However, daily industrial toxins migrate to the Arctic from every part of our planet, making animals and humans of the Arctic among the most contaminated inhabitants of the earth.

Indeed, Banerjee notes that the breast milk of women in Greenland and northern Canada is "as toxic as hazardous waste." Additionally, author Marla Cone, in an excerpt from a book entitled "Silent Snow," presents evidence that Inuit women, who eat a diet rich in whale and seal meat, have high levels of mercury and PCBs in their bodies. As a result, when they breast feed, these poisons are passed to their offspring, putting them at risk of cancer and other diseases.
[...]

"Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point" is an eye-opening account of a precious place that few of us will ever visit. At the same time, the many writers included in the anthology not only share their love of nature, but also raise important questions about our reliance on oil, gas and coal. In addition, one basic point drives the collection. In the words of Sheila Watt-Cloutier, former chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council: "The Arctic is the barometer of the health of the planet and if the Arctic is poisoned, so are we all."

If she's right, and there is plenty of scientific evidence to back her claim, we're nearing the point of no return. The contributors to Arctic Voices - scientists, indigenous people, environmental activists, researchers and scholars - have given us the tools we need to understand the calamity. As Vandana Shiva, author of "Staying Alive: Women, Ecology and Development," writes, "The earth and her beings have been speaking. We stay deaf at our peril."

This article is a Truthout original.

[...]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012
http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices
Price: $26.96US

Format: Hardcover
Pages: 560
Pub Date: July 3, 2012
ISBN: 9781609803858

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The Tale of Uummannaq: a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate & societal change.

Uploaded by UummannaqMusic on Mar 19, 2012

Galya Morrell's short documentary The Tale of Uummannaq, highlights a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate and societal change.

Uummannaq - a heart-shaped island in Northern Greenland - is referred by many as the "Heart of the Arctic." Today, like many other little settlements in the Far North, its culture is at risk of disappearing. The ancient ways of life that had survived for millennia are now disintegrating along with the disappearing ice.

In the old days, the sea ice was the center of a healthy living community. Everything -- food, clothing, legends, and moral values -- came from the sea ice. Songs were composed and stories were told beside seals' breathing holes. Now, as the ice vanishes, people feel that they are rapidly losing the "ground" beneath their feet.

Join us in this rare opportunity to look into the lives and the disappearing culture of the Inuit as they take part in Uummannami Nipi (Uummannaq Music - in Kalallisut), their community-based yet far-reaching initiative in Northern Greenland whose goals are to protect and support the indigenous dog-sledding hunting culture, preserve the old traditions of Inuit music, dance and storytelling, and thereby prevent the epidemic of suicides among the region's youth brought about by the stresses of abrupt climate and societal change.

Arguably the world's northernmost stage on the drifting ice, Uummannami Nipi functions as a collaboration of native hunters, international artists and local children that aims to revive the spirit of the community and protect the unique Greenlandic values that are disintegrating along with vanishing ice and the advance of "consumer civilization."

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Nunavut Social Services Review | CWLC/LBEC

Nunavut Social Services Review | CWLC/LBEC | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

October 7, 2011 - The National Aboriginal Health Organization announce the release of Inuit Child Welfare and Family Support: Policies, Programs and Strategies, on which CWLC collaborated. Please click here to read the press release.

http://www.cwlc.ca/sites/default/files/file/projects/Inuit%20Child%20Welfare%20and%20Family%20Support_News%20Release_2011_English.pdf

To read the full report, please click here.

http://www.cwlc.ca/sites/default/files/file/projects/Inuit%20Child%20Welfare%20and%20Family%20Support%202011.pdf

For more information, please click here.

http://www.naho.ca/inuit/mental-wellness/children-and-social-services/

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Inuit snow goggles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Inuit snow goggles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Snow goggles (Inuktitut; ilgaak, syllabics; ᐃᓪᒑᒃ; Kivalliq dialect: iggaak ᐃᒡᒑᒃ; North Baffin dialect are a type of eyewear traditionally used by the Inuit people of the Arctic to prevent snow blindness. The goggles are traditionally made of a piece of bone or ivory pierced with slits but new ones may be made with wood.

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