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Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
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US Navy admits it needs massive investment to fight for Arctic seaways control

US Navy admits it needs massive investment to fight for Arctic seaways control | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
In anticipation of international military drills in the Arctic this year, the US Navy has developed a detailed plan to establish a massive presence in the region. The road map says urgent investments are required to avoid higher future costs.
Northern_Clips's insight:

"...In anticipation of international military drills in the Arctic this year, the US Navy has developed a detailed plan to establish a massive presence in the region. The road map says urgent investments are required to avoid higher future costs.

The road map acknowledges that by 2020 the Bering Strait will have ice-free conditions for about 160 days a year, whereas by 2025 the now-hypothetic Transpolar transit sea route through the central part of the Arctic Ocean might become open for up to 45 days annually.

The document specifies a large number of detailed tasks and deadlines the US must meet to compete on equal footing with other Arctic nations, already lining up for tough competition for natural resources under the Arctic seabed.

For example, total deposits of hydrocarbons in the Arctic have been valued at over $1 trillion...."

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Feds new confidentiality rules on Arctic project called ‘chilling’

Feds new confidentiality rules on Arctic project called ‘chilling’ | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
bid by the federal government to impose sweeping confidentiality rules on an Arctic science project has run into serious resistance in the United States.
Northern_Clips's insight:
"...DFO’s proposed confidentiality provisions say all technology and “other information” related to the Arctic project “shall be deemed to be confidential and neither party may release any such information to others in any way whatsoever without the prior written authorization of the other party.” If enforced, Muenchow says the fisheries department could prevent researchers from publishing scientific findings, blogging about their project or sharing information on the project with the media and public, which is encouraged by the U.S. agencies co-funding the project. Muenchow and DFO scientists involved in the project travel north by icebreaker to deploy and retrieve instruments to assess oceanographic conditions in the ice-choked Nares Strait, which runs between Canada’s Ellesmere Island and Greenland and may have a significant effect on ocean circulation. Muenchow’s problem with the DFO comes amid growing concern and controversy over the Harper government’s micro-management of scientific projects. Researchers are dismayed at “new” publication procedures sent to many federal fisheries scientists two weeks ago and published on-line by anonymous federal researcher. The procedures say DFO managers will decide when and if studies involving DFO scientists can be published in external scientific journals, which are at the heart of scientific communication. ..."
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National Inuit org puts out “compendium of Inuit ideas”

National Inuit org puts out “compendium of Inuit ideas” | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Terry Audla, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, released what his organization calls a “compendium of Inuit ideas” and attitudes Jan. 29 at a big academic conference on Arctic security and sovereignty. The Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program’s third annual conference, this year called “Arctic Peoples and Security,” is taking place at the University of Toronto until Jan. 30. The Inuit ideas produced by the Nilliajut Project, or “to speak up, speak out,” are contained in a 76-page anthology of essays written mostly by Inuit describing Inuit perspectives on security, patriotism and sovereignty.
Northern_Clips's insight:
The project is produced by Inuit Qaujisarvingat: The Inuit Knowledge Centre, along with the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation and the Canada Center for Global Security Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. Based in Ottawa inside the ITK offices, Inuit Qaujisarvingat is set up to promote Inuit involvement in research that leads to better research, science and policy decision-making.
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Royal Canadian Mint Honours Canadian Inuit Art With Joannassie Nowkawalk Owl Shaman Fine Gold Coin

Royal Canadian Mint Honours Canadian Inuit Art With Joannassie Nowkawalk Owl Shaman  Fine Gold Coin | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Today at the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the Royal Canadian Mint unveiled a 99.99% fine gold collector coin with a 50-cent face value honouring Canadian Inuit Art.

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Northern_Clips's insight:

"The Royal Canadian Mint is proud to celebrate Canada's history, culture and values with special collector coins," said Ian E. Bennett, President and CEO of the Royal Canadian Mint. "This gold coin honours Canadian Inuit art through an intricate design inspired by the original carving of Inuit artist Joannassie Nowkawalk, Owl Shaman holding Goose, part of the Winnipeg Art Gallery's world-class contemporary Inuit art collection."

The coin's reverse design of the owl's round and compact shape conveys the solid physique, adaptations and strength that are essential to surviving in the Arctic while the captured goose reveals the owl's prowess as a hunter.

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Rider completes journey to the Arctic Circle - News - Horsetalk.co.nz

Rider completes journey to the Arctic Circle - News - Horsetalk.co.nz | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
A broken foot didn't stop Vaidotas Digaitis completing a ride to the Arctic Circle.

 

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Long Rider Vaidotas Digaitis, who had already travelled between the Baltic and the Black Seas, recently completed a journey from his own village, Laukuva, in Lithuania, to the Arctic Circle and back.

He left on April 25, 2012, and wrote to the Long Riders’ Guild: “My plan is to ride through the countries bordering on the Baltic Sea: Russia (Kaliningrad), Poland, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Estonia and Latvia.”

Vaidotas arrived at the Arctic Circle at the end of July.

He travelled alone with his two horses, named Kredas and Kaklys, of the endangered Lithuanian breed, Zemaitukai.

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Inside the life of the Inuit: Extraordinary photographs document how Alaska's Eskimos survived some of the world's coldest winters

Inside the life of the Inuit: Extraordinary photographs document how Alaska's Eskimos survived some of the world's coldest winters | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Photographed between 1909 and 1932, the collection offers a rare glimpse in the natives' everyday life from hunting polar bears, to building igloos, to their personal dwellings inside.

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Northern_Clips's insight:

"... An extraordinarily collection of rarely seen photographs capturing Alaska's Eskimos document the hard but persevering survival of the people commonly known as the hunters of the Arctic.

Photographed between 1909 and 1932, the collection offers a rare glimpse in the natives' everyday life from hunting polar bears, to building igloos, to their personal dwellings inside.

Standing with bow and arrows and hand, a hunter photographed in 1924 proudly poses before his kill of a massive polar bear, resting more than twice his size along the snow, arrows protruding from its chest.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2253029/Historic-photographs-document-Alaskas-Inuit-Eskimos-survived-worlds-coldest-winters.html#ixzz2G6BK4M1H
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter ...."
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kbelcher0028's curator insight, September 2, 12:34 PM

This is soo cool! No pun intended..

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Most Arctic Animals Should Deal With Climate Change Just Fine

Most Arctic Animals Should Deal With Climate Change Just Fine | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
New research suggests that most Arctic mammals will actually be helped, not hurt, by climate change
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Northern_Clips's insight:

[excerpt]

In a new study by Anouschka Hof, Roland Jansson and Christer Nilsson, all at Umeå University in Sweden, the trio of scientists found that, in most cases, global warming will actually give a boost to Arctic and subarctic life. Looking at 61 terrestrial mammal species that currently inhabit high-latitude Europe the scientists found that, under climate conditions forecast for the year 2080, the majority of the species will see their ranges expand. They found that warming will actually bring in more species from further south, increasing biodiversity in the region. And, even in their worst-case scenario, they expect at most one species to go extinct: the Arctic fox. But, they suspect that this worst-case scenario is just that, a nightmare scenario unlikely to unfold. Hof and co.:

Our results indicate that, irrespective of the scenario, most species (43 out of 61) will expand and shift their ranges, mostly in a north-easterly direction, in response to expected climate change if we assume that species are able to colonize all areas that become climatically suitable. …We further predict that, irrespective of the scenario, the climate in (sub)arctic Europe will become suitable to ten more mammalian species. …Thus, mammalian species richness in (sub)arctic Europe is likely to increase substantially when full dispersal ability is assumed.

The reason they expect global warming to benefit Arctic mammals rather than hinder them, they say, is that most high-latitude species are generalists: they’re used to having to cope with a wide range of climatic conditions and aren’t too dependent on any one feature of the ecosystem. Think of the North American beaver, a hardy creature, compared to, say, koalas, who wouldn’t make it far without their eucalyptus trees. The specialists like the Arctic fox, the Norway lemming, or the wolverine, they say, may not do so well. But they also don’t expect them to go extinct.


Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/smartnews/2012/12/most-arctic-animals-should-deal-with-climate-change-just-fine/#ixzz2G2WjAqhr
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter 10
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To the Zodiacs! - Students on Ice Arctic Expedition August 10, 2012

Published on Aug 14, 2012 by SOIExpedition

Students on Ice Arctic Expedition 2012

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Russia ambitious about Arctic shelf development

Russia ambitious about Arctic shelf development | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Russia’s Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said that Russia plans to develop its energy fields on the Arctic shelf to produce 66.2 million tons of oil and 230 billion cubic meters of gas by 2030.

“The Arctic shelf contains nearly the fourth part of the world’s energy resources, yet not all opportunities are used to use the most of these resources”, Mr. Medvedev said.

He added that the federal budget alone cannot ensure substantial funding of the project, and cooperation with private investors is required.

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Super Shamou comic book PDF Inuit Broadcasting Corporation

Super Shamou comic book PDF Inuit Broadcasting Corporation | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

http://www.inuitbroadcasting.ca/grfx/kids/Shamou_e.pdf

 

Super Shamou is the world's first Inuk super hero, chosen to provide peace and justice to the people of the Arctic.

Biography

Peter was a mild mannered Inuk until he was visited one night by a spirit that informed him he had been chosen to provide peace and justice to the people of the Arctic, then gave him a charm of great power that transformed him into Super Shamou. He protects the wilderness of Canada, looking out for unwary travellers who fall foul of the unforgiving conditions, and children in particular. As well as rescuing such individuals, he also makes sure to teach them some realities of life in the North.

http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/s/supshamo.htm

 

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Russia’s Arctic Security Strategy - Analysis

Russia’s Arctic Security Strategy - Analysis | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

[excerpt]

November 6, 2011

By Dmitry Gorenburg

The Russian Arctic’s economic Potential

A 2008 US Geological Survey estimates that 13 percent of the world’s remaining oil and 30 percent of its natural gas reserves are located in the Arctic. A relative increase in energy prices compared to the historical average has made the exploitation of these remote and technically difficult resources more cost-effective. Russia’s natural resources ministry has stated that the parts of the Arctic Ocean claimed by Russia may hold more petroleum deposits than those currently held by Saudi Arabia. The same US Geological Survey estimated total Russian offshore oil reserves at 30 billion barrels, while natural gas reserves were estimated at 34 trillion cubic meters (tcm), with an additional 27 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.1

Because most of these deposits are located offshore in the Arctic Ocean, where extraction platforms will be subject to severe storms and the danger of sea-ice, the exploitation of these resources will require significant investment and in some cases the development of new technology. This means that extraction will only be economically feasible if prices for hydrocarbons remain high.

However, Russian natural resources in the Arctic are not limited to hydrocarbons. According to the secretary of Russia’s Security Council, Nikolai Patrushev, the Arctic currently supplies more than 90 percent of Russia’s nickel, cobalt, and platinum, as well as 60 percent of Russia’s copper. Ninety percent of Russian diamonds and 24 percent of its gold is mined in the Arctic region of Yakutia. One of the world’s largest phosphate mines is located on the Kola Peninsula. In addition, Arctic Russia has significant deposits of silver, tungsten, manganese, tin, chromium, and titanium.

Russia

The extraction of these natural resources provides Russia with 11 percent of its GDP and 22 percent of its export earnings.2

In the relatively near future, Russia is likely to develop the significant deposits of rare earths, which are found on the Kola Peninsula and in Yakutia.

The future economic potential of the region is not limited to the extraction of natural resources. In recent decades, it has become clear that climate change is leading to the rapid melting of the polar ice cap, which has already improved access to the Russian Arctic. In the future, Russian planners hope to see the development of a northern sea route that might compete with the Suez Canal route for commercial maritime traffic.

The route is attractive because it is a significantly shorter path from Asia to Europe than via the Suez Canal or around the Cape of Good Hope. Furthermore, the route avoids the risks posed by pirates operating in the Straits of Malacca and in the Indian Ocean of the coast of Somalia. However, these benefits are offset by the added expense of having to hire icebreakers and the potential for delays due to unexpected ice or severe storms.

While analysts differ on how quickly the Northern Sea Route will become commercially viable, the consensus seems to indicate that while the passage will be largely ice free during the summer by 2015, regular commercial traffic may not be feasible for another 20–30 years.

Finally, the region represents one of the world’s most significant fishing areas. While the Arctic’s share of global fisheries has been stable at four percent for the last 30 years, it is likely to increase as the result of over-fishing in other parts of the world.

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Surveying the #Arctic for the establishment of the #DEW Line - a set on Flickr

"My father was part of a team surveying Arctic regions for the establishment of the DEW (Distant Early Warning) Line from Greenland, across to Ellesmere Island and Baffin Island, then down Hudson Bay to Churchill. These are photos he took along the way." TerryMcT

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Will Shattered Ice Cap Shatter Ice Melt Record This Year? This Is Your 2013 Arctic Freezing Season On Crack

Will Shattered Ice Cap Shatter Ice Melt Record This Year? This Is Your 2013 Arctic Freezing Season On Crack | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Will Shattered Ice Cap Shatter Ice Melt Record This Year? Image of massive Arctic sea ice cracks showing temperature of the ice and the cracks between floes. Via Arctic Sea Ice blog.

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Will Shattered Ice Cap Shatter Ice Melt Record This Year? This Is Your 2013 Arctic Freezing Season On Crack http://ow.ly/js3Q0

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China’s creep into Greenland is setting off alarm bells: $2.35 billion iron ore mining project okayed

China’s creep into Greenland is setting off alarm bells: $2.35 billion iron ore mining project okayed | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Much is made of China "going green." But maybe more attention should be paid to China going to Greenland.
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Northern_Clips's insight:

"...No longer. Prime minister Kuupik Kleist sees extraction of Greenland’s abundant natural resources as a way to shake free of Denmark—the island of 57,000 people is a semi-autonomous territory. A bill passed in December introduced a framework to open up extraction of these resources, which the peel-back of melting glaciers is making increasingly plentiful, to foreign wildcatters...."

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Russia explores old nuclear waste dumps in Arctic

Russia explores old nuclear waste dumps in Arctic | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

"...Russia's drive for Arctic oil and gas is complicated by the presence of old nuclear waste dumps in the Kara Sea. 

The toxic legacy of the Cold War lives on in Russia's Arctic, where the Soviet military dumped many tonnes of radioactive hardware at sea.

For more than a decade, Western governments have been helping Russia to remove nuclear fuel from decommissioned submarines docked in the Kola Peninsula - the region closest to Scandinavia.

But further east lies an intact nuclear submarine at the bottom of the Kara Sea, and its highly enriched uranium fuel is a potential time bomb.

This year the Russian authorities want to see if the K-27 sub can be safely raised, so that the uranium - sealed inside the reactors - can be removed.

They also plan to survey numerous other nuclear dumps in the Kara Sea, where Russia's energy giant Rosneft and its US partner Exxon Mobil are now exploring for oil and gas. ... Secret dumps

On the western flank is a closed military zone - the Novaya Zemlya archipelago. It was where the USSR tested hydrogen bombs - above ground in the early days.

Besides K-27, official figures show that the Soviet military dumped a huge quantity of nuclear waste in the Kara Sea: 17,000 containers and 19 vessels with radioactive waste, as well as 14 nuclear reactors, five of which contain hazardous spent fuel. Low-level liquid waste was simply poured into the sea...."

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Northern_Clips's insight:

"...As if to underline the strategic priorities, Russia is boosting its military presence in the Arctic and the Northern Fleet is getting a new generation of submarines, armed with multiple nuclear warheads...."

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New Russian law discriminates against indigenous languages

New Russian law discriminates against indigenous languages | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

The controversial law on education, signed by President Vladimir Putin on New Year’s Eve, states that classes in non-Russian languages cannot be conducted to the detriment teaching in Russian language.

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The law text officially recognizes the right to education in languages of Russia’s ethnic minorities, but does not make it mandatory of completely guarantee such education

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Taking the reigns of the Arctic Council

Taking the reigns of the Arctic Council | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
But does Canada have the wrong approach for the circumpolar north?

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"... Federal Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, who will represent Canada on the council, says it’s also a good chance to correct international misconceptions.

“When you hear environmental research studies, ban this or ban that, it does not reflect what regimes we put in place to protect the environment we live in,” she says. “It’s a real opportunity for people on the ground in the North to tell the world what we’re doing.

“How do we use the opportunity of this chairmanship to bring our issues forward, to reach out to other countries that have impacted our way of life without ever setting foot (here)?

“The northern folks … see it as an opportunity to open trade, tourism, what have you, during our chairmanship and I’m in agreement with this.”

That may be too narrow an approach, warns Byers.

“The Canadian government needs to do a better job of communicating its Arctic policies, (but) the role of the Arctic Council chair is not to act as a public relations officer for any one country...."

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As Climate Crisis Intensifies, Two Arctic Ice Seals Gain Endangered Species Act Protection

As Climate Crisis Intensifies, Two Arctic Ice Seals Gain Endangered Species Act Protection | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

Today’s decision provides Endangered Species Act protections to all populations of the ringed seal and the Pacific subspecies of the bearded seal, which inhabits Alaska and parts of Russia and Canada. The Act will provide a safety net for these seals that includes habitat protections, recovery planning and, most importantly, a prohibition on federal actions that could jeopardize the seals. Listing of the seals will not affect subsistence harvest by Alaska natives, which is exempted from the law’s provisions.

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Northern_Clips's insight:

For Immediate Release, December 21, 2012

Contact:  Shaye Wolf, (415) 632-5301

As Climate Crisis Intensifies, Two Arctic Ice Seals Gain Endangered Species Act Protection

First Species Since Polar Bear Listed Primarily Because of Climate Change

SAN FRANCISCO— Responding to a 2008 petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the federal government today finalized Endangered Species Act protection for two ice-dependent Arctic seals http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/mammals/bearded_ringed_and_spotted_seals/index.html threatened by melting sea ice and snowpack due to climate change. Ringed seals and bearded seals, found in the waters off Alaska, are the first species since polar bears to be protected primarily because of climate change threats.

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Zac Gnt's curator insight, October 19, 11:29 AM

Souvent, on attends assez tard pour faire ce genre de chose, mais ça reste néanmoins une bonne chose de faite.

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A New Study Suggests That Global Warming Won't Kill Off The Polar Bears

A New Study Suggests That Global Warming Won't Kill Off The Polar Bears | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
Global warming may benefit Arctic animals by expanding their ranges and increasing biodiversity in the area as warmer-climate species move into the area.

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Northern_Clips's insight:

The research was published yesterday, Dec. 20, in the Journal PLoS ONE.

Smithsonian.com reported:

Scientists found that, in most cases, global warming will actually give a boost to Arctic and subarctic life. Looking at 61 mammal species that currently inhabit high-latitude Europe the scientists found that, under climate conditions forecast for the year 2080, the majority of the species will see their ranges expand. They found that warming will actually bring in more species from further south, increasing biodiversity in the region. And, even in their worst-case scenario, they expect at most one species to go extinct: the Arctic fox. But, they suspect that this worst-case scenario is just that, a nightmare scenario unlikely to unfold.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/global-warming-helps-arctic-species-2012-12#ixzz2G2Vc57IN
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US Coast Guard eyes all-terrain vehicles to take on Arctic Ocean

US Coast Guard eyes all-terrain vehicles to take on Arctic Ocean | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it
WANTED: U.S. Coast Guard in need of an amphibious Arctic craft that can handle treacherous sea ice and extreme cold off Alaska's northern coast.

[excerpt]

Nationwide the agency operates scores of response boats that do everything from conduct rescues to fight fires to bust drug-runners to help defend America's coastline. But there's no fleet based in the U.S. Arctic, where an increasing number of ships ply the frigid seas off Alaska's shores in support of oil development, shipping and tourism.

As a result, the Coast Guard is looking for a versatile patrol vessel that fits into a C-130, a large cargo plane, and can be launched from shore to negotiate ice-choked seas, big waves and the Arctic coast's ever-shifting sands, the Coast Guard's research center announced this year.

The agency's search so far has yielded two bulky and strange-looking vehicles that the Coast Guard will review in live demonstrations this week in Barrow, the nation's northernmost community located along the Arctic Ocean. The peculiar craft are made by family-owned companies -- one from Alaska, the other from Canada.

They generally look like a World War II-era tank crossbred with a barge or a tug. Versatile they are, their inventors claim. They perform like boats in open water. But beneath their hulls, tracks let them rumble over sea ice and snowy shores.

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Chronicling the War of Nature vs. Greed: A Review of "Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point"

Chronicling the War of Nature vs. Greed: A Review of "Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point" | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

The collected essays of Native Alaskans, environmental activists, scientists and researchers form a counternarrative to Big Oil's PR blitz in the increasingly polluted Northern Hemisphere.
[excerpt]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012

http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices

According to editor Subhankar Banerjee, "the Arctic is warming at a rate double that of the rest of the planet." This, of course, has already had a discernible impact on the animals, fish and people of the region - and beyond. As rising temperatures have put many scientists and everyday folks on high alert, they are increasingly primed for battle against profit-hungry corporations and the drill-baby-drill crowd, who see the Arctic's immense stock of coal, oil and other natural resources as a tremendous boon - environment be damned.

The 31 essays in "Arctic Voices" contest this destructive greed. Some focus on the indigenous cultures that stand to be eradicated by the folly of energy companies; others address the visible destruction of the lands and waters of Alaska, Russia, Iceland and Greenland. Dozens of photos - both black-and-white and color - hammer the realities of contamination and pollution. It's a sobering read, especially for urban dwellers whose existence is far removed from the subsistence lifestyle of the Gwich'in, Inupiat and Inuit people.

"We're all connected to the northern hemisphere," Banerjee writes in an introduction to the volume: "

Hundreds of millions of birds migrate to the Arctic each spring from every corner of the earth - including Yellow Wagtail from Kolkata - for nesting and rearing their young and resting - a planetary celebration of global interconnectedness. On the other hand, caribou, whale and fish migrate hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles, connecting numerous indigenous communities through subsistence food harvests - local and regional interconnectedness. However, daily industrial toxins migrate to the Arctic from every part of our planet, making animals and humans of the Arctic among the most contaminated inhabitants of the earth.

Indeed, Banerjee notes that the breast milk of women in Greenland and northern Canada is "as toxic as hazardous waste." Additionally, author Marla Cone, in an excerpt from a book entitled "Silent Snow," presents evidence that Inuit women, who eat a diet rich in whale and seal meat, have high levels of mercury and PCBs in their bodies. As a result, when they breast feed, these poisons are passed to their offspring, putting them at risk of cancer and other diseases.
[...]

"Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point" is an eye-opening account of a precious place that few of us will ever visit. At the same time, the many writers included in the anthology not only share their love of nature, but also raise important questions about our reliance on oil, gas and coal. In addition, one basic point drives the collection. In the words of Sheila Watt-Cloutier, former chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council: "The Arctic is the barometer of the health of the planet and if the Arctic is poisoned, so are we all."

If she's right, and there is plenty of scientific evidence to back her claim, we're nearing the point of no return. The contributors to Arctic Voices - scientists, indigenous people, environmental activists, researchers and scholars - have given us the tools we need to understand the calamity. As Vandana Shiva, author of "Staying Alive: Women, Ecology and Development," writes, "The earth and her beings have been speaking. We stay deaf at our peril."

This article is a Truthout original.

[...]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012
http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices
Price: $26.96US

Format: Hardcover
Pages: 560
Pub Date: July 3, 2012
ISBN: 9781609803858

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The Tale of Uummannaq: a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate & societal change.

Uploaded by UummannaqMusic on Mar 19, 2012

Galya Morrell's short documentary The Tale of Uummannaq, highlights a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate and societal change.

Uummannaq - a heart-shaped island in Northern Greenland - is referred by many as the "Heart of the Arctic." Today, like many other little settlements in the Far North, its culture is at risk of disappearing. The ancient ways of life that had survived for millennia are now disintegrating along with the disappearing ice.

In the old days, the sea ice was the center of a healthy living community. Everything -- food, clothing, legends, and moral values -- came from the sea ice. Songs were composed and stories were told beside seals' breathing holes. Now, as the ice vanishes, people feel that they are rapidly losing the "ground" beneath their feet.

Join us in this rare opportunity to look into the lives and the disappearing culture of the Inuit as they take part in Uummannami Nipi (Uummannaq Music - in Kalallisut), their community-based yet far-reaching initiative in Northern Greenland whose goals are to protect and support the indigenous dog-sledding hunting culture, preserve the old traditions of Inuit music, dance and storytelling, and thereby prevent the epidemic of suicides among the region's youth brought about by the stresses of abrupt climate and societal change.

Arguably the world's northernmost stage on the drifting ice, Uummannami Nipi functions as a collaboration of native hunters, international artists and local children that aims to revive the spirit of the community and protect the unique Greenlandic values that are disintegrating along with vanishing ice and the advance of "consumer civilization."

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#Facebook to build #Arctic #serverfarm in Sweden NOT #NWT #Yukon #Nunavut @NWTel ?#CdnPoli - @eyeonthearctic

#Facebook to build #Arctic #serverfarm in Sweden NOT #NWT #Yukon #Nunavut @NWTel ?#CdnPoli - @eyeonthearctic | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

#Facebook to build #Arctic #serverfarm in Sweden NOT #NWT #Yukon #Nunavut @NWTel ?#CdnPoli -

via @eyeonthearctic

[excerpts] Facebook is to build a new server farm on the edge of the Arctic Circle — its first outside the United States — to improve performance for European users, officials of the social networking site said Thursday.It will also expose them to potential eavesdropping from a Swedish intelligence agency, according to Sweden's Pirate Party, a group opposing government interference with the internet.

Facebook confirmed Thursday it had reviewed potential locations across Europe and decided on the northern Swedish city of Lulea for the data center partly because of the cold climate — crucial for keeping the servers cool — and access to renewable energy from nearby hydropower facilities.

The move reflects the growing international presence of the California-based site, which counts 800 million users worldwide.

[...]

Construction could cost $760 million

Facebook didn't give the price of its investment, but Lulea officials have previously projected construction costs of up to $760 million. The Swedish government said it was ready to pitch in with $16 million.
[...]

With winter temperatures well below freezing and summertime highs that rarely climb above 25 C, Lulea has used its frigid climate as a selling point in its efforts to establish itself as a hub for server farms. Other Nordic cities have adopted similar strategies.

In 2009 Google purchased a paper mill in Hamina, southern Finland, and turned it into a data center, using seawater from the Baltic Sea for its cooling system.

Servers inside data centers are the backbone of internet services such as Facebook. The servers store and transmit billions of status updates, links, photos and all the outside apps used by Facebook's members.

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Alaskan EcoEscape Permaculture's curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:47 PM

The cost of building facebook servers for all of our data---better in the arctic?  #onid431

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Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge

Discuss suicides openly, advocates urge | Inuit Nunangat Stories | Scoop.it

t's common for one suicide to trigger another in Arctic communities, said Susan Aglukark, seen here in 2006. She will take part in a concert to mark World Suicide Prevention Day. Nathan Denette/Canadian Press

[excerpt]

Suicide is one of the last truly taboo topics, the shameful secret that few want to talk about and that silence can inadvertently lead to people taking their own lives.

Mental health advocates say that while the recent highly publicized suicides of several prominent sports figures have shone a spotlight on the issue, the lack of frank public discussion about causes and prevention is leaving those at risk for suicide and their loved ones as much in the dark as ever

[...]

Statistics show that suicide rates are five to seven times higher for First Nations and Inuit than for non-Aboriginal youth. Among Inuit youth alone, the suicide rate is 11 times the national average.

Aglukark said young people — among them children as young as 12 or 13 — are most at risk for taking their own lives for all the reasons "we hear about" — poverty, inadequate housing, substandard education, substance abuse, family violence, and the list goes on.

"It's very common for one suicide to trigger another, and to trigger another, in communities. They're so isolated, they're so far away," said the singer, who is also chair of the Arctic Children and Youth Foundation, a group whose mandate is to improve the lives of young Aboriginals in Canada's North.

"I think part of the problem is they get caught up and stuck in the cycle of despair. How do you move on? How do you have closure when you're caught up in a constant, steady crisis?" Aglukark said.

"It's heartbreaking to know what needs to happen and to be powerless to see it happen fast enough."

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