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What is a part of the United States?


Via Seth Dixon
pascal simoens's insight:

qui m'a dit un jour que l'"Europe, c'est compliqué?"...

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:54 PM

APHG-U4

CHS AP Human Geography / Beth Gehle & Amy Rossello's curator insight, August 17, 2014 5:28 PM

Use in Political Geo unit, or for Canada and US region

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:09 PM

I honestly feel like we are never taught about these areas ever in US schools. We are always drilled about the 50 states and that's it. I would be interested in learning the history behind why this is still the case and what is keeping our government from considering them part of the states. The fact that they wont even consider American Samoa's citizens is a disgrace.

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Netatmo challenges Nest with smart smoke detector, adds siren to camera - ArsTechnica

Netatmo challenges Nest with smart smoke detector, adds siren to camera - ArsTechnica | numeric | Scoop.it
“A new HomeKit-capable smoke detector, plus a loud camera accessory.”
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Sowee, la station connectée pour rendre la maison intelligente - Web des Objets

Sowee, la station connectée pour rendre la maison intelligente - Web des Objets | numeric | Scoop.it
“Sowee, le hub connecté 100% dédiée au confort de la maison. La station gère la consommation d'énergie et contrôle les objets connectés domotiques.”
Via Marketing BA France
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The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior

The path of the solar eclipse is already altering real-world behavior | numeric | Scoop.it
“The highly anticipated event is casting a long shadow online.”

The upcoming solar eclipse is poised to become the “most photographed, most shared, most tweeted event in human history,” in the words of one astronomer. Millions of people will watch it, potentially overwhelming the cities and towns along the eclipse's path of totality.

According to Google, interest in the eclipse has exploded nationwide in the past few months, mirroring national media attention. The county-level search data above, provided by Google, paints a striking picture: Interest in the eclipse is concentrated in the path of totality that cuts through the middle of the country, receding sharply the farther you go from that path.

Tags: Sun, space, media.


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Climat: le réchauffement altère les crues des rivières en Europe

Climat: le réchauffement altère les crues des rivières en Europe | numeric | Scoop.it
“Le réchauffement climatique altère les crues des fleuves et des rivières à travers l'Europe, menaçant les activités agricoles et les infrastructures sur l'ensemble du continent, révèlent les conclusions d'une vaste étude publiée jeudi dans la revue américaine Science.”
Via Hubert MESSMER @Zehub on Twitter
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Radar warns motorcycle pilots of nearby traffic before they even see the oncoming cars

Radar warns motorcycle pilots of nearby traffic before they even see the oncoming cars | numeric | Scoop.it

Radar warns motorcyclists of nearby traffic before they see oncoming cars. Motorcyclists are 18 times more likely to be killed in a collision. This new technology is about to change that. The claim is that this new radar could prevent nearly one-third of all motorcycle accidents.

RADAR technology initially developed for use in driverless cars has been adapted for motorcycles. Vehicle-to-vehicle communications developer Cohda Wireless from South Australia has partnered with Bosch, Ducati and Autotalks on a “digital protective shield” that warns riders of nearby traffic before they see oncoming cars. Bosch is commercializing the technology in Ducati production bikes but the radar could also be retrofitted to any car or motorcycle.

Production of the technology is being driven by a proposed mandate from the United States Department of Transportation that would require all new vehicles to have vehicle-to-vehicle radars installed. Cohda Wireless Managing Director Paul Gray said the radar was the next step in safety from seatbelts and airbags. “Technologists have gone as far as they can in terms of minimizing harm during an accident and now it is about avoiding the accidents before they even happen,” he said.

“If a motorcyclist is riding down the street, it will be alerted when a car turning onto the same road creates an opportunity for an accident. This can also happen when the car moving onto the road is not visible to the rider. The radar will also alert drivers who are changing lanes if someone is in their blind spot, which is quite an issue for motorcyclists.”

Gray said the technology would eventually be in every autonomous car as well. Cohda commands about 60% of the vehicle-to-vehicle communication market. The system uses the public WLAN standard (ITS G5) as the basis for the exchange of data between motorcycles and cars.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Abigail Hines's curator insight, July 25, 1:32 AM

I expect my future workplace, no matter where it is, to employ new safety techniques and to be constantly thinking of new ways to improve safety.

 

In this article, the author talks about a technology called 'RADAR', which has been developed for motorcyclists. It warns 'motorcyclists of nearby traffic before they see the oncoming cars'. I believe this technology is essential to the safety development of any country. I hope to see RADAR or a similar program introduced into Australia in the years to come. Not only will it reduce the alarming number of motorcycle accidents, but with further advancement it could reduce the accident rate of bigger vehicles such as cars and trucks. 

 

In this growing 21st century, we can achieve amazing things, so why can we not reduce accident and injury rates?

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Etat des lieux sur la ville intelligente [Infographie] - Le Cadre Digital

Etat des lieux sur la ville intelligente [Infographie] - Le Cadre Digital | numeric | Scoop.it
“La ville intelligente se développe, les projets Smart City se multiplient. Mais qu'en est-il vraiment de l'intégration de l'IoT dans nos grandes villes ?”
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Self-driving and electric cars will have tons of strange effects on society

Self-driving and electric cars will have tons of strange effects on society | numeric | Scoop.it

Autonomy and electrification will have bigger impacts on the world than you might expect.

First, a bit of managing expectations: without regulatory incentives, America’s electric car adoption looks like it will be slow to grow, and the first wave of autonomous cars might prove to be rather underwhelming. And while automakers and technology firms are indeed racing to reboot our cars—making these technologies seemingly inevitable—they are likely to take a while to get here.

What's less certain is how they'll change the world. Benedict Evans, a partner at the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz and no stranger to tech trends analysis, has published some thoughts on what he calls second- and third-order effects of the disruption that’s going to play out on our highways. And his insights describe a future made fundamentally different by the technologies.

Consider electrification. We know that losing the internal combustion engine will be good for the planet. But, as Evans points out, a lot will change when the supporting infrastructure for gas guzzlers disappears: many repair shops will be out of a job, because most car maintenance is focused around the motor. And gas stations no longer have a purpose, so what happens to the convenience stores that they contain—and the half of America’s tobacco sales that gas stations account for?

As for self-driving cars, every company involved in the nascent industry is keen to point out that autonomous vehicles will crash less frequently than those driven by humans. But the benefits of a car that can drive itself aren't limited to moving folks from A to B: it can also go park itself somewhere usually considered too inconvenient for human passengers, ready to be beckoned when needed. That means that huge swaths of land in the hearts of cities, currently used as parking lots, could be repurposed—potentially upending the real estate market.

These are just a couple of the examples Evans provides, and there are far more to consider. He also traces out large-scale ramifications for the electricity industry, as home solar storage systems for car charging help solve the problem of peak demand; increased commute distances made possible by autonomous cars that drive faster and fender-to-fender; and huge shifts in the public transit sector as on-demand autonomous vehicles break down boundaries between cars, taxis, and buses.

But it's the combination of these outcomes that's really interesting. In an America without gas stations and inner-city parking lots, where on-demand transport rivals public transit, and car crashes are nonexistent, the urban landscape is redefined. In Europe, most cities predate cars by centuries, and were always built to be walkable. They could easily revert to type. American cities, on the other hand, have been designed around the car. That means that the way they’re used could change altogether.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mixed reality: Experience gets more intuitive, immersive, and empowering

Mixed reality: Experience gets more intuitive, immersive, and empowering | numeric | Scoop.it
“Increasingly, augmented and virtual reality are about more than gaming—companies are finding enterprise potential in the technology. The goal: to replace keyboards and flat displays with new paradigms for communication and collaboration, bringing a major shift in user engagement.”

Mixed reality elevates the potential of AR, VR, and IoT technology by combining the best of our digital and physical realities. Instead of removing users completely from the real world, or simply layering flat content on top of our immediate view, MR adds intelligence—physics, gravity, dimension, even personality—to digital content relative to the space around us. As a result, we are able to blur the lines between what is real and what is imagined while stripping away the barriers that interfere with our ability to make decisions quickly, absorb and process critical information, visualize possible scenarios before acting, or share knowledge and tasks between individuals and groups. Science fiction no longer, the future of engagement is here, and enterprises will likely be the first to embrace it.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes

Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes | numeric | Scoop.it

"It’s no secret that the Great Lakes are suffering tremendous ecological strain — Lake Erie was even pronounced “dead” for a time during the 1960s because of an overload of phosphorus from municipal waste. Back in 1615, though, when the entire region was pristine and explorers Samuel de Champlain and Étienne Brûlé gazed out together from Lake Huron’s shores, they dubbed it la mer douce, 'the sweet sea.' Today roughly one-quarter of Canada’s population and a 10th of America’s population drink from the Great Lakes basin; the beleaguered lakes alone hold more than a fifth of Earth’s freshwater."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 4:57 PM

Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  How does this similar map shed more light on these issues?  

 

TagsCanada, environment, resources, waterspatial, scale

Lou Salza's curator insight, April 15, 11:52 AM
These lakes are a tremendous resource, not only for the region but the nation as well. They need our attention and protection.-Lou 
 
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Cet objet Welle transforme toute surface en un contrôleur intelligent

Cet objet Welle transforme toute surface en un contrôleur intelligent | numeric | Scoop.it
“ Le Welle est un nouveau contrôleur intelligent de la maison qui utilise un sonar pour reconnaître les commandes effectuées par des gestes.”
Via Freewares&Tutos, Jacquy Lenoir
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Microsoft’s quest for a topological quantum computer

Microsoft’s quest for a topological quantum computer | numeric | Scoop.it

The race is on build a ‘universal’ quantum computer. Such a device could be programmed to speedily solve problems that classical computers cannot crack, potentially revolutionizing fields from pharmaceuticals to cryptography. Many of the world's major technology firms are taking on the challenge, but Microsoft has opted for a more tortuous route than its rivals.

IBM, Google and a number of academic labs have chosen relatively mature hardware, such as loops of superconducting wire, to make quantum bits (qubits). These are the building blocks of a quantum computer: they power its speedy calculations thanks to their ability to be in a mixture (or superposition) of ‘on’ and ‘off’ states at the same time.

Microsoft, however, is hoping to encode its qubits in a kind of quasiparticle: a particle-like object that emerges from the interactions inside matter. Some physicists are not even sure that the particular quasiparticles Microsoft are working with — called non-abelian anyons — actually exist. But the firm hopes to exploit their topological properties, which make quantum states extremely robust to outside interference, to build what are called topological quantum computers. Early theoretical work on topological states of matter won three physicists the Nobel Prize in Physics on 4 October, 2016.

The firm has been developing topological quantum computing for more than a decade and today has researchers writing software for future machines, and working with academic laboratories to craft devices.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nantes, une smart city en puissance

Nantes, une smart city en puissance | numeric | Scoop.it
Ecoquartiers, gestion intelligente de la consommation d’énergie, applications mobiles...
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Démocratisée par Pokémon Go, la réalité augmentée va maintenant conquérir les marques

Démocratisée par Pokémon Go, la réalité augmentée va maintenant conquérir les marques | numeric | Scoop.it
LE CERCLE/POINT DE VUE - La réalité augmentée a franchi le cap de la reconnaissance du grand public. Le

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CDA Parcs's curator insight, September 10, 2016 6:03 PM

Après Pokemon Go, la réalité augmentée va connaître un nouvel essor.

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August unlocks compatibility with mortise deadbolts - CNET

August unlocks compatibility with mortise deadbolts - CNET | numeric | Scoop.it
“Don't have a standard deadbolt? Not a problem. August Smart Locks now work with mortise deadbolts.”
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Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices

Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices | numeric | Scoop.it

The interdisciplinary nexus of biology and engineering, known as synthetic biology, is growing at a rapid pace, opening new vistas that could scarcely be imagined a short time ago.

In a new research, Alex Green, an assistant professor at ASU’s Biodesign Institute, demonstrates how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers. The results of the new study have significant implications for intelligent drug design and smart drug delivery, green energy production, low-cost diagnostic technologies and even the development of futuristic nanomachines capable of hunting down cancer cells or switching off aberrant genes.

“We’re using very predictable and programmable RNA-RNA interactions to define what these circuits can do,” Green said. “That means we can use computer software to design RNA sequences that behave the way we want them to in a cell. It makes the design process a lot faster.” The study appears in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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New algorithm generates folding patterns to produce any 3-D origami structure

New algorithm generates folding patterns to produce any 3-D origami structure | numeric | Scoop.it

In a 1999 paper, Erik Demaine—now an MIT professor of electrical engineering and computer science, but then an 18-year-old PhD student at the University of Waterloo, in Canada—described an algorithm that could determine how to fold a piece of paper into any conceivable 3-D shape.

It was a milestone paper in the field of computational origami, but the algorithm didn't yield very practical folding patterns. Essentially, it took a very long strip of paper and wound it into the desired shape. The resulting structures tended to have lots of seams where the strip doubled back on itself, so they weren't very sturdy.

At the Symposium on Computational Geometry in July, Demaine and Tomohiro Tachi of the University of Tokyo will announce the completion of a quest that began with that 1999 paper: a universal algorithm for folding origami shapes that guarantees a minimum number of seams.

"In 1999, we proved that you could fold any polyhedron, but the way that we showed how to do it was very inefficient," Demaine says. "It's efficient if your initial piece of paper is super-long and skinny. But if you were going to start with a square piece of paper, then that old method would basically fold the square paper down to a thin strip, wasting almost all the material. The new result promises to be much more efficient. It's a totally different strategy for thinking about how to make a polyhedron."

Demaine and Tachi are also working to implement the algorithm in a new version of Origamizer, the free software for generating origami crease patterns whose first version Tachi released in 2008.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A museum of memory in Beirut gets off to a troubled start

A museum of memory in Beirut gets off to a troubled start | numeric | Scoop.it
“NEARLY three decades after the end of the civil war in Lebanon, the façade of the Barakat building in central Beirut is still pitted with bullet holes. Craters in its limestone walls have been patched with concrete and its elegant colonnade is held up by ugly metal struts.”
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America's Best Long Trails

America's Best Long Trails | numeric | Scoop.it
“Plan your next big hike with this map of America's most-loved long trails.”
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 1:47 PM

My uncle hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail and as a kid the enormity of that feat was both inspirational and mind-boggling.  Recently I watched an incredible documentary about an ultra-marathoner's quest on Vermont's Long Trail (Finding Traction: free on Amazon Prime--trailer here).  While I doubt most of us could go the full length of these trails given our jobs, fitness levels, etc., I do think that getting outside to explore some of the physical environments in our local areas this summer sounds like a fantastic idea (high-res map here).  

 

Tags: transportation, landscape, place, sportphysical, environment, mappingmap.

Bridget Barker's curator insight, June 1, 1:27 PM
Not related to fungal pathogens, but work life balance is important!
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Quels sont les enjeux de vie privée et les impacts des cyber-risques dans une Smart City ?

Quels sont les enjeux de vie privée et les impacts des cyber-risques dans une Smart City ? | numeric | Scoop.it
“[Compte rendu] Et si la Smart City présentait de nouveaux risques pour la société en général et les citoyens en particulier ? Avec un paradoxe ”
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Japanese man is first to receive 'reprogrammed' stem cells from another person

Japanese man is first to receive 'reprogrammed' stem cells from another person | numeric | Scoop.it

World-first transplant, used to treat macular degeneration, represents a major step forward in movement to create banks of ready-made stem cells.

On 28 March 2017, a Japanese man in his 60s became the first person to receive cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells donated by another person. The surgery is expected to set the path for more applications of iPS-cell technology, which offers the versatility of embryonic stem cells without their ethical taint. Banks of iPS cells from diverse donors could make stem-cell transplants more convenient to perform, while slashing costs. iPS cells are created by removing mature cells from an individual (for example, from their skin) and reprogramming these cells back to an embryonic state. They can then be coaxed into a type of cell useful for treating a disease.

In the latest procedure, performed on a man from the Hyogo prefecture of Japan, skin cells from an anonymous donor were reprogrammed into iPS cells and then turned into a type of retinal cell, which was in turn transplanted onto the retina of the patient, who has age-related macular degeneration. Physicians hope that the cells will stop the progression of the disease, which can lead to blindness.

In September 2014 at the Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, a Japanese woman underwent a similar procedure to receive retinal cells derived from iPS cells. But these were reprogrammed from cells taken from her own skin. Cells prepared in the same way for a second patient were found to contain genetic abnormalities, and were never implanted. Cells from macular degeneration patients, who tend to be elderly, might have also accumulated genetic defects that could increase the risk of the procedure.

The team decided to redesign the study according to new regulations, and so no more participants were recruited. This month, however, the researchers reported that the Japanese woman fared well1. The introduced cells remained intact one year after surgery, and her vision had not declined, as would usually be expected with macular degeneration.

In Tuesday's procedure — performed at the same hospital and by the same surgeon, Yasuo Kurimoto — doctors used iPS cells that had been taken from a donor’s skin cells, reprogrammed and banked. Japan’s health ministry approved the study, which plans to enroll a total of five patients, on 1 February.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Données personnelles : enjeux, limites, perspectives : Millenaire 3, Transformation urbaine

Données personnelles : enjeux, limites, perspectives : Millenaire 3, Transformation urbaine | numeric | Scoop.it
“Les données que les systèmes techniques recueillent sur leurs utilisateurs sont au coeur des évolutions des rapports entre les organisations e”
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Grâce à l’impression 3D, Boeing va économiser 3 millions de dollars par avion

Grâce à l’impression 3D, Boeing va économiser 3 millions de dollars par avion | numeric | Scoop.it

Pour la première fois, des parties structurelles en titane construites en impression 3D ont été validées par l’administration américaine. La promesse de l'imprimante 3D d'être une solution industrielle devient de plus en plus une réalité. Déjà présente dans plusieurs domaines, notamment dans les prototypes et de plus en plus dans l'automobile, cette méthode commence à toucher l'aéronautique.


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Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one

Boston schools ditch conventional world maps in favor of this one | numeric | Scoop.it
“Social studies classrooms throughout the Boston public school system are getting an upgrade some 448 years in the making.”
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2:21 PM

Personally, I'm not a fan of this decision, but it's as if they watched the classic West Wing clip and decided to roll with it. I think that the Peters projection map is better than the Mercator for most educational applications, but it isn't the "right, best, or true" map projection.  Many viral videos comparing the two love to exaggerate and say things like "The maps you use are lying to you" or "the world is nothing like you've ever seen."  Yes, Mercator maps distorts relative size, but it isn't a "wrong" map anymore than the Peters projection.  All maps have distortion and map readers need to under that all maps are a mathematical representation of the Earth.  

 

Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspectiveeducation, geography, geography educationBoston.

Prescott Kermit's comment, June 15, 5:27 AM
http://www.free-tech-support.com/samsung-technical-support-number
Victor Ventura's curator insight, June 24, 9:00 AM
A new but correct way at looking at the real world. 448 years overdue.
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Growth of underwater cables that power the web

Growth of underwater cables that power the web | numeric | Scoop.it

"The map above, created with data from Telegeography, shows how those cables have developed since 1990. Most existing cables were constructed during a period of rapid growth in the mid-2000’s. This was followed by a gap of several years during which companies steadily exhausted the available capacity. Over the last few years, explosive new demand, driven by streaming video, has once again jumpstarted the the construction of new cables."


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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 26, 2016 5:58 PM
Interconnections
ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 28, 2016 2:48 AM
Growth of underwater cables that power the web
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 2016 5:42 PM

Telecommunication linkages between continents, regions and cities. Note the strength of the trans-atlantic connections. These communication linkages enable communication between these areas.

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How DNA could store all the world’s data and more

How DNA could store all the world’s data and more | numeric | Scoop.it
Modern archiving technology cannot keep up with the growing tsunami of bits. But nature may hold an answer to that problem already.

 

For Nick Goldman, the idea of encoding data in DNA started out as a joke. It was Wednesday 16 February 2011, and Goldman was at a hotel in Hamburg, Germany, talking with some of his fellow bioinformaticians about how they could afford to store the reams of genome sequences and other data the world was throwing at them. He remembers the scientists getting so frustrated by the expense and limitations of conventional computing technology that they started kidding about sci-fi alternatives. “We thought, 'What's to stop us using DNA to store information?'”

 

Then the laughter stopped. “It was a lightbulb moment,” says Goldman, a group leader at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in Hinxton, UK. True, DNA storage would be pathetically slow compared with the microsecond timescales for reading or writing bits in a silicon memory chip. It would take hours to encode data by synthesizing DNA strings with a specific pattern of bases, and still more hours to recover that information using a sequencing machine. But with DNA, a whole human genome fits into a cell that is invisible to the naked eye. For sheer density of information storage, DNA could be orders of magnitude beyond silicon — perfect for long-term archiving.

 

“We sat down in the bar with napkins and biros,” says Goldman, and started scribbling ideas: “What would you have to do to make that work?” The researchers' biggest worry was that DNA synthesis and sequencing made mistakes as often as 1 in every 100 nucleotides. This would render large-scale data storage hopelessly unreliable — unless they could find a workable error-correction scheme. Could they encode bits into base pairs in a way that would allow them to detect and undo the mistakes? “Within the course of an evening,” says Goldman, “we knew that you could.”

 

He and his EBI colleague Ewan Birney took the idea back to their labs, and two years later announced that they had successfully used DNA to encode five files, including Shakespeare's sonnets and a snippet of Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream' speech1. By then, biologist George Church and his team at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, had unveiled an independent demonstration of DNA encoding2. But at 739 kilobytes (kB), the EBI files comprised the largest DNA archive ever produced — until July 2016, when researchers from Microsoft and the University of Washington claimed a leap to 200 megabytes (MB).

 

The latest experiment signals that interest in using DNA as a storage medium is surging far beyond genomics: the whole world is facing a data crunch. Counting everything from astronomical images and journal articles to YouTube videos, the global digital archive will hit an estimated 44 trillion gigabytes (GB) by 2020, a tenfold increase over 2013. By 2040, if everything were stored for instant access in, say, the flash memory chips used in memory sticks, the archive would consume 10–100 times the expected supply of microchip-grade silicon3.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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