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11 of the Most Colorful Cities in the World

11 of the Most Colorful Cities in the World | Nuevas Geografías | Scoop.it

What are the cultural aesthetics of architecture within any particular cultural group?  What do these landscapes say about the people and society that created them?  Do you think there would be economic benefits for Guanajuato's (Mexico) urban layout?  Why is Willemstad more iconically Dutch than most places in the Netherlands? 


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:46 PM

This article tells us the eleven most colorful cities in the world. Although they give us eleven options, everyone knows that the first one is going to be the best one. Number one, the picture that is shown above, is located in Guanajuato City, Mexico. As you can tell from the photo, all of the buildings are different colors. The city was founded in 1554 next to one of the richest mining areas of Mexico. In the 16th century, there was a mining boom, thus led them to the construction of this colorful, beautiful city. Alleyways are spread out in every direction surround by a breathtaking mountain view. This was the only spot that Mexico took on the top eleven scale. The Netherlands took the number two spot along with the number eight spot. First with Willemstad and second with Utrecht. India was another country that took two spots on our countdown. The last two spots were claimed by Jaipur and Jodhpur. Places that were on here that I was surprised about included places like Italy and Sweden. The pictures do not do it justice. The places looked magnificent and I only hope and hope to see them up close and personal one day.

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Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia

Virtual tour of the Haga Sophia | Nuevas Geografías | Scoop.it

This is one of the more impressive cultural landmarks in the world, and architectural marvel.  Studying the cultural landscape reveals that multiple 'layers' are superimposed one upon another.  This phenomenon, known as sequent occupance, is most plainly manifested in this site.  The Haga Sophia has been both a Christian and Muslim holy site, depending which political empire has controlled the city of Istanbul.       


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 12:57 PM

Visiting the Haga Sophia is on my bucket list for sure! I find it fascinating how one beautiful site can radiate so many different historical periods as well as cultural differences. The Haga Sophia has traces of the religions and people that held control over it at one time or another. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:59 PM

Haga Sophia is a cultural landmark that has been a Christian and Muslim holy site that all depends on who was in control of the land of that particular time. This is a great example of different times in history that use the same monument and how it plays a significant role in the people of time past and present.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:29 PM

This is a place of both Christian and Muslim society. It is in control by a system of sequent occupancy, meaning that who ever is in control of the area of the time is in control of the Haga Sophia. This one site shows the past of different religions and people. It tells a story of its past, present and future.