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At the Very Least, Your Days of Eating Pacific Ocean Fish Are Over

It now appears that anywhere from 300 to possibly over 450 tons of contaminated water that contains radioactive iodone, cesium, and strontium-89 and 90, is flooding into the Pacific Ocean from the Fukushima Daichi site everyday.
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As Fukushima Raises Severity Level, Nuclear Expert Warns Radioactive Leaks ... - Democracy Now

As Fukushima Raises Severity Level, Nuclear Expert Warns Radioactive Leaks ... - Democracy Now | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
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As Fukushima Raises Severity Level, Nuclear Expert Warns Radioactive Leaks ...
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Tepco fixes leaky pipe but finds hot spots, jump in radiation

Tepco fixes leaky pipe but finds hot spots, jump in radiation | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
Tokyo Electric Power Co., manager of the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant, said Sunday it halted a slow leak from a pipe connecting two water storage tanks by patching it with ...

Via LIVEEDGES
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Nano biomedical technology to revolutionize modern medicine soon: Dr M Rajaram

Nano biomedical technology to revolutionize modern medicine soon: Dr M Rajaram
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Tepco Nuclear Restart Depends on Safety Call as Shares Surge - Bloomberg

Tepco Nuclear Restart Depends on Safety Call as Shares Surge - Bloomberg | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
Tepco Nuclear Restart Depends on Safety Call as Shares Surge Bloomberg Tepco and four other power companies will apply to the nuclear safety watchdog in July to restart their reactors, the Yomiuri newspaper reported yesterday, without saying how it...
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What If We Detonated a Nuclear Bomb on the Moon?

The U.S. Air Force considered trying to detonate a nuclear device on the moon during the late 1950s. A physicist who worked on the project said a single expl...
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Contamination levels skyrocket at Fukushima plant, up nearly 2,000% — NHK: Quadrillions of becquerels already released; “Gov’t needs to take charge entirely” (VIDEO)

RT @TheWatchers_: Contamination levels skyrocket at Fukushima plant, up nearly 2,000% http://t.co/FK2KVfzQ4y

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Latest Radioactive Leak at Fukushima: How Is It Different? - National Geographic

Latest Radioactive Leak at Fukushima: How Is It Different? - National Geographic | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
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Latest Radioactive Leak at Fukushima: How Is It Different?
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WARNING: TEPCO admits deliberately using radiation detectors that give deceptively low readings; radiation leaks far worse than reported; More Leaks Admitted

WARNING: TEPCO admits deliberately using radiation detectors that give deceptively low readings; radiation leaks far worse than reported; More Leaks Admitted | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
TEPCO admits deliberately using radiation detectors that give deceptively low readings; radiation leaks far worse than reported

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Aging Nuclear Plants Pose Major Safety Risks, IAEA Says

Aging Nuclear Plants Pose Major Safety Risks, IAEA Says | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
VIENNA, July 15 (Reuters) - Significant progress was made last year in strengthening nuclear safety around the world, the U.N. atomic watchdog said in its annual review, despite the "challenge" posed by a large number of ageing reactors.
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Stem cells harvested after death offer new hope for treating certain illnesses

Stem cells harvested after death offer new hope for treating certain illnesses | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
Stem cells can be extracted from bone marrow five days after death to be used in life-saving treatments

 

Dead bodies can provide organs for transplants, now they might become a source of stem cells too. Huge numbers of stem cells can still be mined from bone marrow five days after death to be potentially used in a variety of life-saving treatments.

 

Human bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells, which can develop into bone, cartilage, fat and other cell types. MSCs can be transplanted and the type of cell they form depends on where they are injected. Cells injected into the heart, for example, can form healthy new tissue, a useful therapy for people with chronic heart conditions.

 

Unlike other tissue transplants, MSCs taken from one person tend not to be rejected by another's immune system. In fact, MSCs appear to pacify immune cells. It is this feature which has made MSC treatments invaluable for children with graft-versus-host disease, in which transplants aimed at treating diseases such as leukaemia attack the child instead.

 

Stem cell therapies require a huge numbers of cells though, and it can be difficult to obtain a sufficient amount from a living donor. Could cadavers be the answer? After death, most cells in the body die within a couple of days. But since MSCs live in an environment that is very low in oxygen, Gianluca D'Ippolito and his colleagues at the University of Miami, Florida, wondered whether they might survive longer than the others.

 

Paolo Macchiarini, who researches regenerative medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, describes the work as an excellent advance but says that the cells may not be as healthy as they seem. Their DNA may be affected by the death of surrounding tissue and exposure to cold temperatures. "We need to make sure the cells are safe," he says.

 

Corneal stem cells taken from the eyes of fresh cadavers have already been used to treat blindness in people with eye conditions that result from injury and scarring, but Chris Mason at University College London sees a potential hurdle in using such MSCs in therapy. "The work is novel and intriguing... but it would be better to use a living donor," he says. That's partly because medical regulators oppose treating individuals with stem cells from more than one source. "You can always go back and get more stem cells from a living donor if you need them, but if you use a cadaver, you'll eventually run out."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Japan formally OKs new nuke safety requirements

Japan formally OKs new nuke safety requirements | nuclear safety | Scoop.it
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's nuclear watchdog formally approved a set of new safety requirements for atomic power plants Wednesday, paving the way for the reopening of facilities shut down since the Fukushima disaster in a move critics charge is too hasty.

Via Graham Jervis
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