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WHO's Maurizio Barbeschi talks about MERS, Ramadan, the Hajj, and other mass events

WHO's Maurizio Barbeschi talks about MERS, Ramadan, the Hajj, and other mass events | Science | Scoop.it
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) first emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and has since infected 681 people, of whom 204 have died. It has hop-scotched around the Middle East and appeared in at least eight countries farther afield, but the bulk of cases remain concentrated in the Kingdom.
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What's a Toilet Worth? | Visual.ly

What's a Toilet Worth? | Visual.ly | Science | Scoop.it
Lack of access to sanitation costs the world $260 billion a year.
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The 10 Hottest Fields of Science Research | Wired Science

The 10 Hottest Fields of Science Research | Wired Science | Science | Scoop.it

Scientific research is a large and sprawling endeavor, with thousands of laboratories around the world studying their own ultra-specialized piece of a much more significant whole. It’s the logical intersection of reductionist scientific heritage and centuries of technological advances: in order to advance our understanding of the world around us, we must pursue increasingly specific sub-disciplines, from retina neural computation to space plasma physics.

 

Which is why Thomson Reuters’ scene-scoping study on “100 Key Scientific Research Fronts” is a welcome report for science enthusiasts eager to stay updated on cutting-edge research but lacking the time to read every issue of Science or Nature cover-to-cover.

 

The report ranks research areas with a special sauce formula that first divides the entirety of scientific research into 8,000 categories that form the “Thomson Reuters Essential Science Indicators” database. Within each subdivision, a set of core papers is designated by frequent and clustered citations, identifying foundational scientific literature that earned a lot of shout outs in reports of subsequent discoveries. To find today’s hottest research fields, only core papers published between 2007-2012 were considered; the number of citations of those papers and their average publication date were compiled. As the report notes, “a research front with many core papers of recent vintage often indicates a fast-moving or hot specialty.”

 

This doesn’t necessarily mean these fields are the most important or the most beneficial to society – it just means scientists (and, by extension, groups funding the research) are getting pretty excited about what they’re learning. Here, we take a quick look at the hottest research front in each of ten thematic categories – the sharpest of the cutting edge.

 

Click headline to access the links to the Hottest 10 Fields--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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When space weather attacks!

When space weather attacks! | Science | Scoop.it
Power outages. Disrupted communications. Diverted airplanes. How business is coping with big risks from outer space.
BulletinOfTheAtomic's insight:

Fascinating article by Brad Plumer at Washington Post

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Onagawa: The Japanese nuclear power plant that didn’t melt down on 3/11

Onagawa: The Japanese nuclear power plant that didn’t melt down on 3/11 | Science | Scoop.it
“The earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011, were natural disasters of a magnitude that shocked the entire world. Although triggered by these cataclysmic events, the subsequent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant cannot be regarded as a natural disaster. It was a profoundly manmade disaster—that could and should have been foreseen and prevented.”
BulletinOfTheAtomic's insight:

This is an amazing article that explains why the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, which was closer to the earthquake epicenter and received the same level of tsunami activity as Fukushima, didn't experience problems. It's all because it is run by a different company than TEPCO.

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How to destroy chemical weapons

How to destroy chemical weapons | Science | Scoop.it
The recent news that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is willing to accede to the international Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) has raised the question: How might one actually go about eliminating Syria’s chemical munitions?
BulletinOfTheAtomic's insight:

Paul Walker of Global Green USA explains what's in store if Syria's chemical weapons are destroyed, and the different ways to do it.

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Thinking outside Fukushima

Thinking outside Fukushima | Science | Scoop.it
This month—nearly two and a half years after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station—the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) finally admitted that it needed outside help to control the numerous problems at its stricken plant.
BulletinOfTheAtomic's insight:

Great info from Federation of American Scientists president Charles D. Ferguson.

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Explore – To this day, Prometheus still holds the count for...

Explore – To this day, Prometheus still holds the count for... | Science | Scoop.it
“To this day, Prometheus still holds the count for the most rings of any tree, at 4,862. The next oldest tree, called Methuselah, was identified by Edward Schulman in the 1950s and is still alive...
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David Gifford's curator insight, July 22, 2013 3:57 AM

Plants genomes can be far larger than human...