Nuclear Physics
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Bizarre Magnetic Particle Revealed in Ultra-Cold Lab Experiment

Bizarre Magnetic Particle Revealed in Ultra-Cold Lab Experiment | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
A behavior predicted by the famous physicist Paul Dirac in 1931 has been shown in a system of ultracooled atoms in the lab. The system mimics a magnetic monopole, which has only one pole, passing through an electron.
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Nuclear Physics
Selected contemporary works in Nuclear Physics
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The Manhattan Project, Part 1

The first of two episodes that tell the story of an unprecedented, U.S. government effort to beat Nazi Germany in the race to construct a nuclear weapon
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Study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life

Study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
In the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes. To address this cosmic possibility, a University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA
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In a neutron-rich tin nucleus, electromagnetism can win over the strong force | Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News

In a neutron-rich tin nucleus, electromagnetism can win over the strong force | Scienmag: Latest Science and Health News | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
The atomic nucleus offers a unique opportunity to study the competition between three of the four fundamental forces known to exist in nature, the strong nuclear interaction, the electromagnetic interaction and the weak nuclear interaction. Only the much weaker gravitational force is irrelevant for the description of nuclear properties. Although in general the decay of an excited nuclear state follows the hierarchy of these forces, there are sometimes exceptions. In a recent experiment performed at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN, an international collaboration with scientists from eleven countries, led by scientists of the Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC (Spain) and the RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan), made a very surprising observation: High-energy gamma rays -- which are mediated by the electromagnetic force -- are emitted in the decay of a certain excited nucleus -- tin 133, in competition with neutron emission, the decay mode mediated by the strong nuclear force. This is despite the fact that the neutron emission was expected to be orders of magnitude faster since the force is much stronger. The discovery, reported in Physical Review Letters, was made using the neutron-rich nucleus 133Sn, which consists of a single neutron coupled to the doubly-magic nucleus 132Sn, a nuclei that is very stable due to its doubly-magic status. The nuclei were produced knocking out a neutron from a slightly heavier nucleus, 134Sn, at relativistic energies. The gamma radiation emitted in the decay of its excited states was detected using the gamma ray spectrometer DALI2. According to Pieter Doornenbal of the Nishina Center, "This was quite surprising as we would expect neutron emission to be much faster. We believe that the ability of electromagnetic decay to successfully compete with neutron emission is due to to nuclear structure effects, one of the ingredients of Fermi's golden rule describing the probability of a certain decay process to occur." The RIBF results suggest that structure effects, which are commonly neglected in the evaluation of neutron-emission probabilities in calculations of global beta-decay properties for astrophysical simulations, are much more important than generally assumed, in particular in the region "south-east" of 132Sn, where nuclei are very neutron-rich. According to Doornenbal, "One of the significances of this finding is that it could help us gain a better understanding of nuclear synthesis of the elements in our Universe -- in other words, how our Universe came to have the nuclei that it does. Nearly half the heavy elements beyond iron are believed to be made by what is known as the r process, which takes place in supernovae. Neutron emission is usually emitted from calculations on the decay of neutron-rich nuclei, because it is not considered to play an important role. But our work shows that this may need to be reconsidered, and that our understanding of how nuclei are produced by the r process may need to be revised." ### Media Contact Jens Wilkinsonjens.wilkinson@riken.jp81-484-621-225 @riken_en http://www.riken.jp/en/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.202502 | Science news and articles on health, environment, global warming, stem cells, bird flu, autism, nanotechnology, dinosaurs, evolution -- the latest discoveries in astronomy, anthropology, biology, chemistry, climate & bioengineering, computers, engineering ; medicine, math, physics, psychology, technology, and more from the world's leading research centers universities.
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Two-step nuclear reactions: The Surrogate Method, the Trojan Horse Method and their common foundations

Two-step nuclear reactions: The Surrogate Method, the Trojan Horse Method and their common foundations | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
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1967: First test of ISOLDE at the 600 MeV CERN Synchrocyclotron

1967: First test of ISOLDE at the 600 MeV CERN Synchrocyclotron | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it

1967: First test of ISOLDE at the 600 MeV CERN Synchrocyclotron

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Where in the universe are the heavy elements on the periodic table created?

Where in the universe are the heavy elements on the periodic table created? | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
New constraints on theoretical nuclear models will help to determine the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture process One of the longstanding open problems in physics is the quest to understand how the elements on the periodic table are created in nature. The heaviest of these elements, those above iron, are believed to be…
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'Fire-streaks' are created in collisions of atomic nuclei

'Fire-streaks' are created in collisions of atomic nuclei | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
At very high energies, the collision of massive atomic nuclei in an accelerator generates hundreds or even thousands of particles that undergo numerous interactions. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, Poland it has been shown that the course of this complex process can be represented by a surprisingly simple model: extremely hot matter moves away from the impact point, stretching along the original flight path in streaks.
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Internal structure of cesium-bearing radioactive microparticles released from Fukushima nuclear power plant

Internal structure of cesium-bearing radioactive microparticles released from Fukushima nuclear power plant | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Microparticles containing substantial amounts of radiocesium collected from the ground in Fukushima were investigated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray microanalysis with scanning TEM (STEM).
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New plutonium discovery lights way to clean up nuclear waste

New plutonium discovery lights way to clean up nuclear waste | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Plutonium has long been part of many countries' nuclear energy strategies, but scientists are still unlocking the mysteries behind this complicated element and seeing how they can use heavier, nuclear elements to clean u
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Nuclear reactions in exploding stars

Nuclear reactions in exploding stars | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Astrophysical reactions that are almost impossible to measure can now be studied in the laboratory The field of Nuclear Astrophysics is an exciting field that brings together scientists from many different communities: Stellar Observers, astrophysics modellers, meteorite experts, nuclear experimentalists and theorists, atomic physicists...and the list goes on. We all come together to answer some…
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NICA — Universe in the lab

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) prepared materials for holding events for schoolchildren on the theme "NICA - The Universe in th
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Nuclear Physics Might Hold The Key To Cracking Open The Standard Model (Synopsis)

Nuclear Physics Might Hold The Key To Cracking Open The Standard Model (Synopsis) | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
“It was quite the most incredible event that has ever happened to me in my life. It was almost as incredible as if you fired a 15-inch shell at a piece of tissue paper and it came back and hit you.…
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Particle Accelerators as Tools to Investigate Astrochemistry

Particle Accelerators as Tools to Investigate Astrochemistry | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
(2017). Particle Accelerators as Tools to Investigate Astrochemistry. Nuclear Physics News: Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 23-27. doi: 10.1080/10619127.2016.1246018
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Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model

Towards a self-consistent dynamical nuclear model | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Are nuclear models as versatile as we would like in the new era of Radioactive Beam  Facilities? Nuclei are among the most challenging systems to accurately describe in physics. They are made from few to more than two hundred strongly interacting and self-bound fermions showing wide spectrum of phenomena such as superfluidity, shape phase transitions,…
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Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs).
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Nuclear Physics Around the Unitarity Limit

Nuclear Physics Around the Unitarity Limit | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Many features of three- and four-nucleon nuclei are well explained by a perturbative expansion around the unitarity limit. It is conjectured that this approach could work for heavier nuclei as well.
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Dosime

Protect What Matters Most: The Dosime Radiation Safety Device is the first-of-it's kind. Do you know the dose?
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Strangeness in nuclear physics

Strangeness in nuclear physics | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Everyday matter is made of the lightest up and down quarks. The strange quark is the third lightest of all quarks. Strangeness, a property of particles associated with the number of strange quarks, preceded the theory and discovery of the quark by about two decades. Recent experimental and theoretical developments in the field of strangeness in nuclei are reviewed. Topics include the production of strange particles, properties of hypernuclei, and strange dense matter.
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Everything You Need to Know About Nuclear Physics

Everything You Need to Know About Nuclear Physics | Nuclear Physics | Scoop.it
Shini from the YouTube series CrashCourse takes a dive into the world of Einstein and nuclear physics.
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FIONA to Take on the Periodic Table’s Heavyweights | Berkeley Lab

A new tool will be taking on some of the periodic table’s latest heavyweight champions to see how their masses measure up to predictions.
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