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Frugal Gift Idea: Homemade Instant Hot Chocolate

Frugal Gift Idea: Homemade Instant Hot Chocolate | Nourish | Scoop.it
This homemade instant hot cocoa is a great alternative to the prepackaged kind! It makes a fantastic, frugal gift. Make a single serving or a whole batch.
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DIY: Homemade Oat Flour

DIY: Homemade Oat Flour | Nourish | Scoop.it
Save 50% with homemade oat flour instead of store-bought plus improves texture & flavor! Tips for using in recipes and simple tutorial for making your own.
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One Man Holds a PATENT That Could Crush MONSANTO and Change The World

One Man Holds a PATENT That Could Crush MONSANTO and Change The World | Nourish | Scoop.it
Monsanto does not want this article to go viral, for if it does, it could very well bring about their demise. Please share!!!

 

 

http://www.loveclicks.org/food/paul-stamet-patent/


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Fermented Beverage Smackdown: Kombucha vs. Kefir

Fermented Beverage Smackdown: Kombucha vs. Kefir | Nourish | Scoop.it
Don't ask me how it happened but our house has become a veritable laboratory of fermenting beverages. And I'm not talking beer, like most normal home brewers (been there, done that), but stinky, sk...
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5 Life Lessons I Learned From Working At Whole Foods - The Frisky

5 Life Lessons I Learned From Working At Whole Foods - The Frisky | Nourish | Scoop.it
The Frisky 5 Life Lessons I Learned From Working At Whole Foods The Frisky After reading 7 Life Lessons I Learned from Working at Starbucks, I was inspired to write my own list, with an organic, artisan, locally sourced Whole Foods twist.
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Nettle properties as natural remedies kidney problems - YouTube

Nettle tea is excellent for diseases and inflammations of the urinary system contains a mild laxative effect excellent at depurative remedies useful for trea...
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Homemade Ginger Beer Recipe | Epicurious.com

Homemade Ginger Beer Recipe | Epicurious.com | Nourish | Scoop.it
Unlike supermarket ginger ales, which are made with carbonated water, corn syrup, and ginger flavoring, this spicy ginger beer is made the old-fashioned way, with lots of fresh grated ginger, sugar, yeast, and water. As the yeast ferments over a day or so, it creates a natural carbonation. Though many recipes leave the ginger sediment as is, we think straining it out produces a more refined quaff. For a different route to a similar drink, go to Homemade Ginger Ale. Ingredients About 1/4 pound ginger, peeled 1 cup sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast About 2 quarts water Equipment: a Microplane grater; a funnel; a clean 2-liter plastic bottle with cap Preparation Grate enough ginger using Microplane to measure 3 1/2 tablespoons, then put in a fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl to collect juice, pressing on solids and then discarding. Place funnel in neck of bottle and pour in 3 tablespoons ginger juice (reserve any remaining for another use). Add sugar, lemon juice, yeast, and a pinch of salt. Fill bottle with water, leaving about 1 1/2 inches of space at top. Remove funnel and screw cap on tightly. Gently shake bottle to dissolve sugar. Let stand at room temperature until plastic feels hard and no longer indents when squeezed, 24 to 36 hours. Chill ginger beer until very cold. Cooks’ Note: Ginger beer keeps, chilled, 1 week.
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Natural uses for cinnamon

Natural uses for cinnamon | Nourish | Scoop.it
Natural uses for cinnamon Natural uses for cinnamon Power of insulin Cinnamon has high levels of magnesium, iron, and calcium as well as rich in polyphenols (antioxidants). The polyphenols in cinnamon increase the sensitivity of cells to insulin which favors the regulation of blood sugar levels. The Alzheimer’s The organic compound responsible for the flavor and the characteristic of cinnamon produces a protective effect that inhibits the accumulation in the part of the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Cholesterol and triglycerides A dose of between 1 and 6 grams of cinnamon a day added to food would be enough to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Heart Cinnamon is an anti-inflammatory agent that helps to reduce the likelihood of having heart attacks, thanks to the activity of the membranes of the platelets. Influenza Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties found in cinnamon helps to fight influenza and it’s most common symptoms such as fever and nasal congestion. Digestion Digestive problems can be resolved with the help of the cinnamon. It relieves the stomach pain, especially intestinal infections that cause diarrhea.
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Great Gouda! World's oldest cheese found - on mummies

Great Gouda! World's oldest cheese found - on mummies | Nourish | Scoop.it
A paper just out reports 3,800-year-old cheese, the world's oldest, that was laid in lumps on the neck of a mummy excavated in western China. (3,000 year old mummies buried with #kefir!
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Leslie DeShane - Learning to add fermentation | Facebook

Learning to add fermentation (Learning to add fermentation http://t.co/Q6g2oGxVkk)
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Oxford organic farm gets growing

Oxford organic farm gets growing | Nourish | Scoop.it

.

The seed of an idea for an organic farm at Oxford College is beginning to take root. This spring, Oxford welcomes its first organic farmer, who will help transform a grassy field on Emory Street into a thriving, colorful patchwork of crops and a living laboratory for students.

"For several years we had had a vision of developing an organic farm, but the enabling event was the gift of land," explains Dean Stephen Bowen. The 11-plus acres at 406 Emory St. was donated to the college in 2011 by Trulock Dickson ,‘72Ox-’74C. It’s the former home of Marshall and Fran Elizer, who joined Oxford in the 1940s.

The farm will be used "to model the use of sustainable farming techniques to support our local community and to provide education and training opportunities for our students on the issues of sustainability," Bowen explains.

"The final piece was to find the right person to lead the farm," says Bowen. "We wanted someone who was not only an accomplished organic farmer, but also an experienced farm educator."

A nationwide search turned up Daniel Parson, named to Mother Nature Network’s 40 Farmers Under 40 list and recognized with the Georgia Organics Land Steward of the Year Award. Parson’s 15 years of organic farming experience includes managing the Clemson University organic farm, Gaia Gardens in Decatur, Ga. and most recently his own venture, Parson Produce, near Clinton, S.C.

Since joining Oxford in early January, Parson has dug in. His initial focus will be to ready the land for farming: planting cover crops to enrich the soil; improving the drainage and installing irrigation; and building a barn to store tools and equipment.

The first crops ­— sweet potatoes, squash, and peppers — will be planted later this spring, to be grown over the summer and harvested in the fall. The farm will produce a diversity of vegetables, "choreographed by a rotation plan," Parson explains, as well as orchard fruit, cut flowers and shitake mushrooms grown on hardwood logs.

Longer-term plans call for the construction of hoop houses, which allow cold-hardy crops to grow all winter, to extend the growing season so it matches the flow of the school year.

"My focus right now is to get the farm up and running, to have something for the students to work with," Parson explains.

And students will be involved with the farm from the very beginning, he says.

"We want to involve students as much as possible so they can learn to grow their own food, connect with the source of their food. There’s going to be a lot of hands-on learning."

Lessons from the farm will be incorporated into the classroom curriculum. Faculty from across Oxford will be invited to use the farm as a resource in their teaching, Parson says.

"Farmers today have to be growers, mechanics, business people, salesmen and marketers," he says. "So almost any field of study could reflect on the farm."

A grand opening is slated for fall 2014. "Fall is one of the great seasons in the Southeast. And every year is going to be a big fall, because right when the students arrive on campus is a great time to be planting a big fall crop," he says.

The farm is expected to reap many benefits for Oxford.

The Oxford organic farm is expected to break even financially in its first few years. Parson envisions selling produce through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and at farmers markets.

But because "the organic farm movement is synonymous with the local farm movement," Parson says, "the first stop will be the Oxford community." Food grown on the farm will be served in the Oxford dining hall.

In addition to "having that good food on campus," Parson adds, farm work "is a great stress reliever for folks who might be overwhelmed with studies to come out and spend some good productive time, with a tangible result, on the farm."

Later this spring, Parson and his family will move into the former Elizer home. Parson’s wife, Molly McGehee ‘07Ph.D., is currently a professor at Presbyterian College in South Carolina. She will join Oxford’s Humanities Division in fall 2014.

Parson looks forward to educating and engaging with the community.

"I want students, faculty and staff to come out to the farm as much as they want. But they will learn very quickly that if they are out at the farm, they will be put to work," he adds with a laugh.

    

 


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Patrick Sudlow's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:41 AM

Organic farming is the only long term and sustainable method for providing food, which is also a low carbon method. 

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Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor

Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor | Nourish | Scoop.it
Dispute over contamination of organic farm in Australia will set legal precedent

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Giri Kumar's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:22 PM

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—In a landmark case, an organic farmer in Western Australia state is suing his neighbor for allegedly contaminating his crop with a genetically modified organism (GMO), GM canola. This is the first claim anywhere in the world by a “non-GMO farmer against a GMO farmer,” says Joe Lederman of the specialist law firm FoodLegal in Melbourne.

Australia lifted a nationwide moratorium on GM crops in 2009. Only the state of South Australia prohibits planting of GM crops, a ban expected to hold until at least 2019. Because it is legal to sow GM crops in Western Australia, the case now being heard in the Western Australia Supreme Court in Perth turns on whether the GM farmer was negligent in the sense of not taking strict enough measures to contain GM material on his property, says University of Western Australia legal expert Michael Blakeney, an adviser to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In court documents, Steve Marsh states that his organic farm, southeast of Perth, was contaminated in 2010 by GM canola, which he claims came from Michael Baxter’s farm. As a result, that year Marsh lost his National Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Australia (NASAA) organic certification for approximately 70% of his property, on which he grows oats and rye and keeps sheep. Marsh is seeking damages of $85,000 for lost income and a permanent injunction preventing Baxter from planting GMOs within 1 kilometer of his farm.

Baxter’s lawyers contend that he maintained the required 500-meter buffer zone around his crop and say there was no justification for removing Marsh’s certification. They argue that Marsh should sue NASAA for imposing unrealistic standards. The association has zero tolerance for GM material of any sort. In contrast, the United States allows products with up to 5% GM material to be labeled “organic.” Even the European Union, where public perception of GM crops is generally negative, allows up to 0.9% GM material. “Zero tolerance is not realistic for crops growing in the vicinity of GM crops,” says plant scientist Graham King of Southern Cross University in Lismore.

The case does not question the science or safety of GM crops that have Australian regulatory approval. The outcome, however, might impact labeling and product information of both GM and non-GM foods, says bioethicist Rachel Ankeny with the University of Adelaide. She claims that such information is “currently inadequate in Australia.”

The case not only pits neighbor against neighbor; it’s also shaping up as what some see as a David versus Goliath battle. According to the Australian Associated Press, Marsh’s legal costs are being partly funded from a crowdsourced Internet appeal, while the biotechnology giant Monsanto is backing Baxter. The case is expected to run at least another week.

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No Bees No People?

No Bees No People? | Nourish | Scoop.it
Honeybees are in trouble, add now the bumblebee. Without these crucial pollinators the future looks grim.
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14 Facts the Organic Industry Doesn't Want You to Know - Don't Waste the Crumbs

14 Facts the Organic Industry Doesn't Want You to Know - Don't Waste the Crumbs | Nourish | Scoop.it
Before you spend another dollar on organic food, read these 14 facts the organic industry doesn't want you to know. You'll be shocked to learn the truth!
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The Drought Fighter - Craftsmanship Magazine

The Drought Fighter - Craftsmanship Magazine | Nourish | Scoop.it
Using his own techniques, a controversial farmer may have found the most effective way to grow food in a warming and increasingly urbanized world.

 

 

http://craftsmanship.net/drought-fighters/

 


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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 8, 2015 5:51 AM

How do you get experiments like this to happen in the developing world, where the local market for quality fruit and vegetable or even organic foods doesn't seem to exist?

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 8, 2015 6:05 AM

Very interesting article about alternative farming practices.  Spot on considering this is the U.N.'s Year of Soil.  Our interest in it is how these practices support bees, but for general farm productivity and quality, his results are astounding.


En Ingles.

YEC Geo's curator insight, March 11, 2015 9:31 AM

Last year, Paul Kaiser's farm grossed over $100,000 an acre, without any weeding or sprays. 

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Microbes Will Feed the World, or Why Real Farmers Grow Soil, Not Crops - Modern Farmer

Microbes Will Feed the World, or Why Real Farmers Grow Soil, Not Crops - Modern Farmer | Nourish | Scoop.it

It's not just better crops that will feed the world -- it's better microbes.

 

http://www.grit.com/farm-and-garden/crops/remineralize-soil-ze0z1502znut.aspx

 


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Why you should be skeptical of Walmart's cheap organic food

Why you should be skeptical of Walmart's cheap organic food | Nourish | Scoop.it
Out on the mean streets of the U.S. organic foods industry, Walmart has stepped onto the corner with both guns drawn. On Thursday, the superstore behemoth announced its plan to partner with Wild Oats (which you may recognize as a former subsidiary of Whole Foods) to offer a line of organic goods at unprecedentedly low prices in 2,000 of its U.S. stores. To start, the line will offer primarily canned goods and other pantry staples that will cost up to 25 percent less than those of other organic brands. At first blush, this appears to be great news. Cheaper, more accessible organic food – isn’t that one of the prerequisites for the kind of healthy food system we’ve all been waiting for? The New York Times notes that Walmart’s big move could ultimately create a larger supply of organic goods, pushing down organic prices in the long run.
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Whole Foods, Superfoods, and Kale are Great, But What if You're On a Tight Budget?

Whole Foods, Superfoods, and Kale are Great, But What if You're On a Tight Budget? | Nourish | Scoop.it
1. You don’t need to buy organic produce. If it’s in your budget, go for it, but if it’s not, don’t fret. The benefits of eating plentiful amounts of vegetables and fruits far outweigh the downsides of pesticide exposure. So make eating more produce, however you can afford it, your number one priority. 2. You don’t need to eat quinoa…or even know how to pronounce it. Brown rice, oats, and other whole grains are less expensive and equally nutritious. 3. You don’t need to drink fresh-pressed juices. Eating veggies and fruits in their whole, unconcentrated form is just as healthy (if not more), and a whole lot cheaper. 4. You don’t need to be a yogi, go to spin class, or run marathons. You don’t need to spend a fortune on a gym membership either. Walking is one of the best forms of exercise. Almost everyone can do it, and it’s fabulously free. 5. You don’t need to sprinkle chia on everything you eat. Chia seeds are packed with good stuff, but you can get fiber and healthy fats from from other, everyday foods. 6. You don’t need to seek out superfoods. As far as I’m concerned, all vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and seeds are superfoods, so if you’re including these foods in your diet regularly, you’re already a super-foodie. 7. You don’t need to binge on kale. Eat your favorite veggies, or whatever’s fresh or on sale at the market. If you prefer spinach, or broccoli, or cauliflower, or green beans, eat those. I love kale, and it’s certainly very nutrient-dense, but so are a lot of other foods. 8. You don’t need to eat only dark chocolate. If you’re a milk chocolate lover, hide in shame no longer. Whatever your favorite treats are, there is room for occasional tastes of them in your diet. 9. You don’t need to buy pricy protein shakes or bars. If you enjoy these products, and they’re not loaded with sugar or other undesirable ingredients, then use them — but you can easily meet your protein needs with whole foods like beans, lentils, chicken, fish, low-fat dairy, and nuts.
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Plantain a Natural Remedies Herbal Plant | The Homestead Survival

Plantain a Natural Remedies Herbal Plant | The Homestead Survival | Nourish | Scoop.it
Yes, that pesky weed is your lawn is actually Plantain a natural remedies herbal plant that has many uses. The Plantain herb is astringent, anti-toxic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-histamine, as well as demulcent, expectorant, styptic and a diuretic. The herb can be made into an external poultice to treat insect bites, poison-ivy rashes, minor sores and boils. It can also be used into wild food foraging recipes such as salads, pesto and creamy green sauces. Plantain Leaf Organic Cut & Sifted – Plantago Lanceolata, 1 lb,(Starwest Botanicals)
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9 Foods with More Sugar Than a Krispy Kreme Doughnut

9 Foods with More Sugar Than a Krispy Kreme Doughnut | Nourish | Scoop.it
Worldwide, the average person consumes 70 grams of sugar and high-fructose corn syrup per day (that's 17 teaspoons), up 46 percent from three decades ago. Yet, in countries like the US, Brazil, Australia and Mexico, sugar consumption is actually much higher, averaging 40 teaspoons per person per day for Americans (compared to just seven for those living in China). And when children younger than 4 are removed from the mix, sugar consumption in the US rises by another 5-10 percent! It's a shocking amount of sugar, but what is even more startling is the potential damage it can do to your health. 9 Foods with More Sugar Than a Doughnut While you may consider yourself savvy when it comes to spotting sugar-laden foods, the report revealed some real sugar shockers. Before we get into just how troublesome all of this excess sugar may be, let's first look at how stealthily it is hidden in some seemingly healthful foods. The following nine foods all have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut (which, for comparison, contains 10 grams of sugar): Luna bar: 11 grams of sugar Grande Starbucks latte: 17 grams Subway 6" sweet onion teriyaki chicken sandwich: 17 grams Tropicana orange juice, 8 ounces: 22 grams Yoplait original yogurt: 27 grams Vitamin Water, 20 ounces: 33 grams Sprinkles red velvet cupcake: 45 grams California Pizza Kitchen Thai chicken salad: 45 grams Odwalla superfood smoothie, 12 ounces: 50 grams Added Sugars Represent 17 Percent of the Average US Diet …but when all forms of sugars are included, the data suggests that sugar makes up 38 percent of the typical US diet. Among added sugars, 43 percent come from sweetened beverages, which is concerning since it's now known that calories in liquid form are processed differently by your body than those consumed in solid form. The report noted:2
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Support Earth Month by Taking the Non-GMO Challenge - Huffington Post

Support Earth Month by Taking the Non-GMO Challenge - Huffington Post | Nourish | Scoop.it
For the past 44 years, people across the globe have celebrated our beloved planet during Earth Month in April. Originating from the first Earth Day, which occurred on April 22, 1970, this monthlong celebration serves as a reminder of the many steps we can take to support the well-being of this beautiful planet we call home. Recognizing the far-reaching impacts of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) on our environment, the Non-GMO Project created the Non-GMO Challenge as one way that people can take action to support Earth Month. The Non-GMO Challenge is an action-oriented campaign that offers education, inspiration, and rewards for making a meaningful commitment to going non-GMO. Now in its third year, the Challenge provides tools and tips for commitments of every size, ranging from committing to one non-GMO meal this month to eating completely non-GMO all month long. Looking for inspiration? Check out the photos people have shared of their non-GMO commitment on the Non-GMO Project's website. You can upload a photo that shares your commitment!
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how to make (almost sugar-free) fermented kombucha | Sarah Wilson

how to make (almost sugar-free) fermented kombucha | Sarah Wilson | Nourish | Scoop.it
When I was a kid my brother Ben used to grow mushrooms and raise axolotls in his bedroom (in and around my brother Pete's feral mess and a pile of skateboards (Have you tried our @remedykombucha yet?
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No Bees No People?

No Bees No People? | Nourish | Scoop.it
Honeybees are in trouble, add now the bumblebee. Without these crucial pollinators the future looks grim.
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Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor

Organic Farmer Sues GM Farming Neighbor | Nourish | Scoop.it
Dispute over contamination of organic farm in Australia will set legal precedent

Via Giri Kumar, Joleen Bennett
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Giri Kumar's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:22 PM

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA—In a landmark case, an organic farmer in Western Australia state is suing his neighbor for allegedly contaminating his crop with a genetically modified organism (GMO), GM canola. This is the first claim anywhere in the world by a “non-GMO farmer against a GMO farmer,” says Joe Lederman of the specialist law firm FoodLegal in Melbourne.

Australia lifted a nationwide moratorium on GM crops in 2009. Only the state of South Australia prohibits planting of GM crops, a ban expected to hold until at least 2019. Because it is legal to sow GM crops in Western Australia, the case now being heard in the Western Australia Supreme Court in Perth turns on whether the GM farmer was negligent in the sense of not taking strict enough measures to contain GM material on his property, says University of Western Australia legal expert Michael Blakeney, an adviser to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

In court documents, Steve Marsh states that his organic farm, southeast of Perth, was contaminated in 2010 by GM canola, which he claims came from Michael Baxter’s farm. As a result, that year Marsh lost his National Association for Sustainable Agriculture, Australia (NASAA) organic certification for approximately 70% of his property, on which he grows oats and rye and keeps sheep. Marsh is seeking damages of $85,000 for lost income and a permanent injunction preventing Baxter from planting GMOs within 1 kilometer of his farm.

Baxter’s lawyers contend that he maintained the required 500-meter buffer zone around his crop and say there was no justification for removing Marsh’s certification. They argue that Marsh should sue NASAA for imposing unrealistic standards. The association has zero tolerance for GM material of any sort. In contrast, the United States allows products with up to 5% GM material to be labeled “organic.” Even the European Union, where public perception of GM crops is generally negative, allows up to 0.9% GM material. “Zero tolerance is not realistic for crops growing in the vicinity of GM crops,” says plant scientist Graham King of Southern Cross University in Lismore.

The case does not question the science or safety of GM crops that have Australian regulatory approval. The outcome, however, might impact labeling and product information of both GM and non-GM foods, says bioethicist Rachel Ankeny with the University of Adelaide. She claims that such information is “currently inadequate in Australia.”

The case not only pits neighbor against neighbor; it’s also shaping up as what some see as a David versus Goliath battle. According to the Australian Associated Press, Marsh’s legal costs are being partly funded from a crowdsourced Internet appeal, while the biotechnology giant Monsanto is backing Baxter. The case is expected to run at least another week.

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Oxford organic farm gets growing

Oxford organic farm gets growing | Nourish | Scoop.it

.

The seed of an idea for an organic farm at Oxford College is beginning to take root. This spring, Oxford welcomes its first organic farmer, who will help transform a grassy field on Emory Street into a thriving, colorful patchwork of crops and a living laboratory for students.

"For several years we had had a vision of developing an organic farm, but the enabling event was the gift of land," explains Dean Stephen Bowen. The 11-plus acres at 406 Emory St. was donated to the college in 2011 by Trulock Dickson ,‘72Ox-’74C. It’s the former home of Marshall and Fran Elizer, who joined Oxford in the 1940s.

The farm will be used "to model the use of sustainable farming techniques to support our local community and to provide education and training opportunities for our students on the issues of sustainability," Bowen explains.

"The final piece was to find the right person to lead the farm," says Bowen. "We wanted someone who was not only an accomplished organic farmer, but also an experienced farm educator."

A nationwide search turned up Daniel Parson, named to Mother Nature Network’s 40 Farmers Under 40 list and recognized with the Georgia Organics Land Steward of the Year Award. Parson’s 15 years of organic farming experience includes managing the Clemson University organic farm, Gaia Gardens in Decatur, Ga. and most recently his own venture, Parson Produce, near Clinton, S.C.

Since joining Oxford in early January, Parson has dug in. His initial focus will be to ready the land for farming: planting cover crops to enrich the soil; improving the drainage and installing irrigation; and building a barn to store tools and equipment.

The first crops ­— sweet potatoes, squash, and peppers — will be planted later this spring, to be grown over the summer and harvested in the fall. The farm will produce a diversity of vegetables, "choreographed by a rotation plan," Parson explains, as well as orchard fruit, cut flowers and shitake mushrooms grown on hardwood logs.

Longer-term plans call for the construction of hoop houses, which allow cold-hardy crops to grow all winter, to extend the growing season so it matches the flow of the school year.

"My focus right now is to get the farm up and running, to have something for the students to work with," Parson explains.

And students will be involved with the farm from the very beginning, he says.

"We want to involve students as much as possible so they can learn to grow their own food, connect with the source of their food. There’s going to be a lot of hands-on learning."

Lessons from the farm will be incorporated into the classroom curriculum. Faculty from across Oxford will be invited to use the farm as a resource in their teaching, Parson says.

"Farmers today have to be growers, mechanics, business people, salesmen and marketers," he says. "So almost any field of study could reflect on the farm."

A grand opening is slated for fall 2014. "Fall is one of the great seasons in the Southeast. And every year is going to be a big fall, because right when the students arrive on campus is a great time to be planting a big fall crop," he says.

The farm is expected to reap many benefits for Oxford.

The Oxford organic farm is expected to break even financially in its first few years. Parson envisions selling produce through a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and at farmers markets.

But because "the organic farm movement is synonymous with the local farm movement," Parson says, "the first stop will be the Oxford community." Food grown on the farm will be served in the Oxford dining hall.

In addition to "having that good food on campus," Parson adds, farm work "is a great stress reliever for folks who might be overwhelmed with studies to come out and spend some good productive time, with a tangible result, on the farm."

Later this spring, Parson and his family will move into the former Elizer home. Parson’s wife, Molly McGehee ‘07Ph.D., is currently a professor at Presbyterian College in South Carolina. She will join Oxford’s Humanities Division in fall 2014.

Parson looks forward to educating and engaging with the community.

"I want students, faculty and staff to come out to the farm as much as they want. But they will learn very quickly that if they are out at the farm, they will be put to work," he adds with a laugh.

    

 


Via Giri Kumar
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Patrick Sudlow's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:41 AM

Organic farming is the only long term and sustainable method for providing food, which is also a low carbon method.