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Foundations Offering to Bail Out Detroit May Regret Their Decision

Foundations Offering to Bail Out Detroit May Regret Their Decision | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Despite what they say, the grant makers are setting a precedent for other cities and letting their funds be used as passive pools of money for short-term needs.
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Other shoe dropping.

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The Charitable Sector
Donors, Grantmakers and Nonprofits
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Femal CEOs share nonprofit challenge - Sun-Sentinel

Femal CEOs share nonprofit challenge - Sun-Sentinel | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Femal CEOs share nonprofit challenge Sun-Sentinel The new peer groups aim to address the specific concerns of female chiefs at nonprofits, including the constant need to raise funds and cultivate donors, plus the intense pressure of working...
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It's a woman's world...at last.

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Museum Announces More Donors in Detroit Bankruptcy - ABC News

Museum Announces More Donors in Detroit Bankruptcy - ABC News | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
USA TODAY
Museum Announces More Donors in Detroit Bankruptcy
ABC News
The Detroit Institute of Arts says it is just 20 percent shy of its goal to raise $100 million to prevent the sale of art in Detroit's bankruptcy and help city pensioners.
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Companies, Foundations Pledge $26.8M To Save Art At DIA - CBS Local

Companies, Foundations Pledge $26.8M To Save Art At DIA - CBS Local | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
CBS Local Companies, Foundations Pledge $26.8M To Save Art At DIA CBS Local DETROIT (WWJ) - A handful of business are pledging almost $27 million toward the Detroit Institute of Arts' commitment to raise $100 million as part of a “grand bargain”...
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University Diverted State Funds Into Its Own Foundations - Huffington Post

University Diverted State Funds Into Its Own Foundations - Huffington Post | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Hilton Head Island Packet
University Diverted State Funds Into Its Own Foundations
Huffington Post
... Carolina State University President Thomas Elzey.
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Philanthropy NYU :: Features :: George Soros

Philanthropy NYU :: Features :: George Soros | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Philanthropy NYU (George Soros speaks about how his early experiences shaped his outlook on life and drew him toward philanthropy: http://t.co/aYz0P5KQao)...
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Los Angeles' The California Endowment Assessed by Philanthropy Watchdog in New Crowdsourcing Website

Los Angeles' The California Endowment Assessed by Philanthropy Watchdog in New Crowdsourcing Website | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Conducted by top-notch researchers, Philamplify's foundation assessments provide a comprehensive examination of a foundation's grantmaking and operations. The reports incorporate feedback received from the foundation's key stakeholders and offer recommendations designed to maximize foundation effectiveness. Users of crowsourcing platform - - Philamplify.org can comment on and agree or disagree with these recommendations and share stories about how philanthropy has impacted their lives.





SOURCE:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/los-angeles-the-california-endowment-assessed-by-philanthropy-watchdog-in-new-crowdsourcing-website-264586111.html
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Making philanthropy more responsive: What the big guy in California can teach us.

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Giving USA: Americans Gave $335.17 Billion to Charity in 2013; Total Approaches Pre-Recession Peak

Giving USA: Americans Gave $335.17 Billion to Charity in 2013; Total Approaches Pre-Recession Peak | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
The latest developments from our fundraising degree programs, non profit marketing, and more from experts at Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. (#GivingUSA2014 report is out: Annual report on US giving & philanthropy.
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Recovery from the Great Recession. How great is it? 

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Wanted: Three-Handed Superstar Masochists to Run Big Foundations - Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence - Inside Philanthropy

Wanted: Three-Handed Superstar Masochists to Run Big Foundations - Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence - Inside Philanthropy | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
There's been a lot of flux at the top of foundations lately. Three of the biggest—Ford, ...
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House Directs Pentagon To Ignore Climate Change

House Directs Pentagon To Ignore Climate Change | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- The House passed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization bill on Thursday that would bar the Department of Defense from using funds to assess climate change and its implications for national security.

The amendment, from ...
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Rethinking Campaign Finance

Rethinking Campaign Finance | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
A congressional proposal that just might work in a post-Citizens United world.
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Where the U.S. Middle Class Can Still Afford to Buy a House

Where the U.S. Middle Class Can Still Afford to Buy a House | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Hint: It's a lot easier in Cleveland than it is in San Francisco.
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Reihan Salam - The Doom Loop of Philanthropy

Reihan Salam - The Doom Loop of Philanthropy | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Thomas Piketty’s new book on the concentration of wealth in advanced market democracies has prompted a good deal of discussion of dynastic wealth and its possible future. Earlier this month, Ezra Klein of Vox warned that we face a “doom loop of oligarchy,” and his Vox colleague Matt Yglesias recently elaborated on the same theme while making the case for confiscatory taxation. Much of the debate around the taxation of high-earners and the asset-rich revolves around whether high taxes have revenue-dampening effects. Yet Yglesias provocatively suggests that just as we don’t set “sin taxes,” like taxes on tobacco, at revenue-maximizing rates, we ought to consider approaching the taxation of high-earners and the asset-rich in the same way, as a kind of Pigovian tax designed to curb the negative externalities caused by the concentration of wealth:

With the growing concentration of wealth an increasing subject of public concern, it’s time to reconsider whether the application of Laffer-style reasoning to very prosperous individuals is appropriate.


Imposing a marginal tax rate of 90 percent on inheritances worth over $10 million, for example, would probably raise very little revenue. Rather than pay $90 to Uncle Sam for the chance to send $10 more to their kids, rich people would give the money to a tax-exempt charitable institution instead. That wouldn’t help balance the budget — in fact, it would hurt those efforts — but it would help break the doom loop of oligarachy whereby concentrated wealth breeds political power breeds greater concentration of wealth.


Briefly, I wonder if breaking the doom loop of oligarchy by encouraging rich people to give money to tax-exempt charitable institutions might yield another doom loop, namely a doom loop of philanthropy.

First, it is helpful to understand that the non-profit sector is quite large, as John DiIulio Jr. reminds us in “Facing Up to Big Government“:


In 2009, the organizations recognized as non-profits by the Internal Revenue Service reported nearly $1.9 trillion in spending while holding $4.3 trillion in total assets (for comparison, the total assets of state and local governments were about $4.6 trillion). In total, the non-profit sector employed about 13.5 million people (roughly a tenth of the American work force) and accounted for about 5.5% of GDP.

About three-quarters of non-profit organizations, including most faith-based ones, spend under a half a million dollars a year and receive little or no government grant or contract money. But the quarter of the sector’s organizations that boast its biggest annual budgets are highly dependent on direct government funding, meaning that one-third of all non-profit dollars are from government, paid through grants or contracts. For instance, in 2009, Catholic Charities USA alone spent $4.2 billion — and about two-thirds of those expenditures were funded by government grants and contracts.

Over the past quarter-century, government grants to non-profit organizations have nearly tripled (in inflation-adjusted dollars). And just as businesses lobby to keep government contracts flowing, non-profit organizations lobby to preserve government grants and to block measures to limit itemized deductions in the federal tax code. For instance, in November 2011, Independent Sector — an umbrella advocacy organization that represents hundreds of non-profit leaders — rallied members to send a message to Pennsylvania’s Republican senator Pat Toomey, who was then a member of the super committee and pushing for deep spending cuts. Their message: More than 650,000 Pennsylvanians are employed by non-profit organizations.


The large size of the non-profit sector isn’t a case against it, nor is the fact that the largest non-profit organizations essentially serve as “private administrative proxies” for government. Yet it is worth noting that many non-profits devote considerable time and resources to expanding the size and scope of government.


Many in the non-profit world see themselves as providing seed capital for social transformations that will ultimately have to be spearheaded by government. And many of the great foundations endowed by American industrialists, most notably the Ford Foundation, have evolved over time into bulwarks of American liberalism. The Ford Foundation, most notably, is known for funding a wide range of civil rights and social justice organizations that tend to favor a larger and more powerful government, but it is just one of many examples. Among conservatives, there is a widespread belief that the professionalization of non-profit management has tended to entrench a left-of-center worldview, and that the natural drift of philanthropic organizations is to move leftwards. In “Who Do Intellectuals Favor Government Solutions?,” Julian Sanchez offered a simple theory as to why this might be the case:


If the best solutions to social problems are generally governmental or political, then in a democratic society, doing the work of a wordsmith intellectual is a way of making an essential contribution to addressing those problems. If the best solutions are generally private, then this is true to a far lesser extent: The most important ways of doing one’s civic duty, in this case, are more likely to encompass more direct forms of participation, like donating money, volunteering, working on technological or medical innovations that improve quality of life, and various kinds of socially conscious entrepreneurial activity.

You might, therefore, expect a natural selection effect: Those who feel strongly morally motivated to contribute to the amelioration of social ills will naturally gravitate toward careers that reflect their view about how this is best achieved. The choice of a career as a wordsmith intellectual may, in itself, be the result of a prior belief that social problems are best addressed via mechanisms that are most dependent on public advocacy, argument and persuasion—which is to say, political mechanisms.


In fairness, non-profit organizations represent, in theory, a non-governmental approach to solving social problems. Yet in practice, the non-profit community, including the social enterprise community, has a strong bias towards government solutions, which will tend to deter aspiring problem-solvers who believe that, for example, government can inhibit the development of voluntary solutions to social problems. Moreover, the rules and regulations governing non-profit organizations severely limit the potential for creativity and business model innovation, as Dan Pallotta, author of Uncharitable, explained to Russ Roberts in an excellent interview.

And Yglesias has written intelligently and convincingly on the outsized wealth and influence of elite private research universities, which have become a magnet for contributions from wealthy dynasts. He has gone so far as to argue that we should not “give money to fancy colleges” on the grounds that they are highly inegalitarian. So which philanthropies would we like to see grow robustly? Miles Kimball has offered a quirky proposal for giving high-earners a strong tax incentive for contributions to civil society organizations that pass both a a substitute-for-government-spending test and a legitimate-activity-of-government test, which he explains as follows:


The substitute-for-government-spending test in the proposed law is not meant to prevent the total amount of public contributions for some things from going above what the government would do under the current system. Its purpose is simply to make it possible for the government to cut back on some types of spending to an important degree. Although religious congregations would not be directly eligible for public contributions because of the legitimate-activity-of-government test, many already have associated nonprofit organizations that could be eligible. And a large fraction of religious donations are from people who earn less than $75,000 per year. Support of arts enjoyed mainly by the rich, such as opera, might not meet the high-priority test, although the fine arts would still be eligible for the usual deduction for charitable donations. Setting the public contribution goal at 10% of annual income above $75,000 per person should be enough to ensure that nonprofit activities eligible for the public contribution credit are much better funded despite any crowding out or relabeling of existing contributions. There would probably be some reduction in funding for activities not considered important enough to qualify as public contributions—which would occasion much debate about exactly where to set the boundary between “public contributions” and regular charitable contributions—but setting priorities is not a bad thing. 


But now we’re getting awfully close to a situation in which the expansion of philanthropic activity is commensurate with the expansion of government power, as government defines what is and is not a high priority. To be sure, this may well be better than the more likely scenario, which is that in trying to avoid a doom loop of oligarchy we instead wind up with a doom loop of technocracy, in which elite research universities grow ever larger and more powerful and non-profit organizations press for the expansion of a government that operates largely through private administrative proxies. This doom loop might move at an even faster clip than the doom loop of oligarchy, as non-profit organizations are tax-exempt, a fact that has had significant consequences for jurisdictions like New York city, where non-profit medical providers have been growing robustly. Imagine “profitable non-profits” that offer their employees lavish salaries, thus drawing talented workers away from firms engaging in productivity-enhancing business-model innovation, and devoting just as much of their effort to preserving and extending their privileges as they do to their ostensible social missions.

I’m a fan of the non-profit sector, and I believe that philanthropy can do a great deal of good. That doesn’t mean that we don’t have to think rigorously about what supercharging the growth of the non-profit sector might mean.
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Proposed Rule Would Close Gap in FL Water Protection

Proposed Rule Would Close Gap in FL Water Protection | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – For more than a decade, 20 million wetland acres and 2 million miles of streams – including many in Florida – were left unprotected, despite the federal Clean Water Act. Experts say the gap in coverage was the unintended result of two U.S. ...
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Grants From Fidelity Charitable and Schwab Charitable Up Sharply

Grants From Fidelity Charitable and Schwab Charitable Up Sharply | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Fidelity Charitable’s donor-advised fund program announced that its clients made gifts totaling $1.1-billion in the first half of 2014, a 19-percent increase over the first half of 2013, according to a news release.
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Want to Create a Giving Circle? Here’s a Checklist.

Want to Create a Giving Circle? Here’s a Checklist. | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
By Jessica Bearman on behalf of Exponent Philanthropy According to a new report, one in eight American donors has participated in a giving circle—nearly half under the age of 40—and participation in a giving circle can both strengthen social...
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Making it easier to give to the charities you love.

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House Passes Bill Making Charitable Deductions Permanent - Accounting Today

House Passes Bill Making Charitable Deductions Permanent - Accounting Today | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
House Passes Bill Making Charitable Deductions Permanent
Accounting Today
“It's not a debate about the merits of public charities and private foundations.
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12 Reasons Why You Should Gracefully Resign from a Nonprofit Board

12 Reasons Why You Should Gracefully Resign from a Nonprofit Board | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
With all of the talk about the need for good trustees, there are a number of excellent reasons to NOT sit on a particular board of directors. Gene Takagi lists a dozen.
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Teachers Stage Protest Outside Gates Foundation Headquarters – Philanthropy Today - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Teachers Stage Protest Outside Gates Foundation Headquarters – Philanthropy Today - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Teachers stage protest outside @gatesfoundation headquarters http://t.co/xhyRw6vjCs via @seattletimes & @KPLU
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Common Core started a fire and philanthropy is in its path.

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12 Questions Job Seekers Should Ask—and Nonprofits Should Be Able to Answer – Fundraising Wisdom - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy

12 Questions Job Seekers Should Ask—and Nonprofits Should Be Able to Answer – Fundraising Wisdom - Blogs - The Chronicle of Philanthropy | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
.@cweisman gives 12 questions fundraising job seekers should ask—and nonprofits should be able to answer http://t.co/U9EbEoMcTS
Leslie Lilly's insight:

Before you take that development job, you might want to know the answers to these questions.

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Is For-Profit the Future of Non-Profit?

Is For-Profit the Future of Non-Profit? | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
The troubling allure of turning philanthropy into consumer activity
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Private Foundations Funded Push for Common Core Standards - Southern Maryland Headline News

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From Maryand to Florida, Common Core gets pushback, this time because private philanthropy is the villain.

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Utahans Most Likely to Donate Money and Time

Utahans Most Likely to Donate Money and Time | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Utahans in 2013 were the most likely in the U.S. to report donating both their time and their money to others. Charitable giving was generally lowest in Southern and Southwestern states.
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The Uneven U.S. Jobs Recovery Is Even Clearer When Tracked Per Capita

The Uneven U.S. Jobs Recovery Is Even Clearer When Tracked Per Capita | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
California added 900,000 new jobs during the recovery, but they were spread over the state's 38 million residents.
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Should Texas ‘dark money’ donors be disclosed?

Should Texas ‘dark money’ donors be disclosed? | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
A top Texas House committee on Thursday re-examined a possible crackdown on anonymous donations from “dark money” political groups, defying Gov.
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How to Use Tumblr to Get Your Nonprofit Noticed by Potential Donors

How to Use Tumblr to Get Your Nonprofit Noticed by Potential Donors | The Charitable Sector | Scoop.it
Join us on Tuesday, April 22, at 2 p.m. Eastern time for a live video tutorial on how nonprofits are using Tumblr: for fundraising, for blogs, as a website, or to raise awareness.
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