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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Gestion et diffusion de l'information
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« Curation » ou webinage? Un concept à ne pas louper

« Curation » ou webinage? Un concept à ne pas louper | Notebook | Scoop.it

"Les mots intraduisibles ont ceci de merveilleux qu'ils rappellent l'importance du vocabulaire, titillent l'inventivité et poussent au néologisme. Il en va ainsi de "curation", l'activité qui, aux États-Unis (et en Grande Bretagne) consistait à sélectionner les collections d'un musée et à les mettre en scène.
Le terme est utilisé maintenant pour la gestion des flux d'infos en ligne. Produire des nouvelles originales reste essentiel, mais nous découvrons tous ensembles que gérer celles qui nous assaillent ne l'est pas moins, pour les journalistes professionnels comme pour les autres."


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évidemment

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From around the web

Notebook
a personal notebook since summer 2013, a virtual scrapbook
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Scooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM
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This notebook..

is a personal Notebook

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

... designed to collect posts and informations I found and want to keep available but not relevant to the other topics I am curating on Scoop.it (on behalf of ASSIM):

 

the most sucessful being

Immunology, teaching and learning immunology

From flow cytometry to cytomics

 

followed by

Nancy, Lorraine because I am based at Université Lorraine in Nancy

Wuhan, Hubei, because we have a long standing collaboration through a french speaking medical training program between Faculté de Médecine de Nancy and WuDA, Wuhan university medical school and Zhongnan Hospital

and

Immunology and Biotherapies, a page of resources for the DIU Immunologie et Biothérapies

CME-CPD, because I am at EACCME in Brussels, representative of the medical biopathology and laboratory medicine UEMS section

Mucosal Immunity, because it was one of our main research interest some years ago 

 

It is a kind of electroinic scrapbook with many ideas shared by others. thanks to them

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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Open Knowledge
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Online tools for researchers

Online tools for researchers | Notebook | Scoop.it
Here you will find a list of online "web 2.0" tools, designed for researchers. The list will be updated progressively as this blogs explores the different services out there. I - Using "the crowd" ...

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10 Reasons Why Students Aren't Using eTextbooks - OnlineUniversities.com

10 Reasons Why Students Aren't Using eTextbooks - OnlineUniversities.com | Notebook | Scoop.it

Here are several reasons why students aren't yet warming up to the idea of e-textbooks today.


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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Scientific social network
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Researchers in the cloud by Thomas Crouzier

Researchers in the cloud by Thomas Crouzier | Notebook | Scoop.it
When I was doing my PhD some 3 years ago, the only collaborative tool we used was Google Docs. Today there are many amazing new websites and tools for research. A recent review covered the emerging tools “that are changing (or have the potential of changing) the way researchers do and communicate their work." From the ability of cloud-based tools to connect researchers,...

Via MyScienceWork
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

The first point discussed by Thomas Crouzier is the potential of cloud-based services for scalabity and rapid exchange of large amounts of information. The author lists research management tools such as Labguru, as well as multidisciplinary social-media platforms (including MyScienceWork, of course). There is also a nice list of specialized and thematic services that will update our own list of digital tools for research (Addgene, PlasmID, Protocol.io, Slideshare and Figshare, etc.)

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How many scholarly papers are on the Web? At least 114 million, professor finds | Penn State University

How many scholarly papers are on the Web? At least 114 million, professor finds | Penn State University | Notebook | Scoop.it
How many scholarly papers are on the Web? At least 114 million, professor finds
Stephanie Koons
October 9, 2014
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Lee Giles, a professor at Penn State’s College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST), has devoted a large portion of his career to developing search engines and digital libraries that make it easier for researchers to access scholarly articles. While numerous databases and search engines track scholarly documents and thus facilitate research, many researchers and academics are concerned about the extent to which academic and scientific documents are available on the Web as well as their ability to access them. As part of an effort to make the process of accessing documents more efficient, Giles recently conducted a study of two major academic search engines to estimate the number of scholarly documents available on the Web.

“How many scholarly papers are out there?” said Giles, who is also a professor of computer science and engineering (CSE), a professor of supply chain and information systems, and director of the Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory. “How many are freely available?”

Giles and his advisee, Madian Khabsa, a doctoral candidate in CSE, presented their findings in “The Number of Scholarly Documents on the Public Web,” which was published in the May 2014 edition of PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science. The paper was also mentioned twice in Nature, a prominent interdisciplinary scientific journal, as well as various blogs and websites.

In their paper, Giles and Khabsa report that they estimated the number of scholarly documents available on the Web by studying the overlap in coverage of two major academic search engines: Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. By scholarly documents, they refer to journal and conference papers, dissertations and master’s degree theses, books, technical reports and working papers. Google Scholar is a freely accessible Web search engine that indexes the full text of scholarly literature across an array of publishing formats and disciplines. Microsoft Academic Search is a free public search engine for academic papers and literature, developed by Microsoft Research for the purpose of algorithms research in object-level vertical search, data mining, entity linking and data visualization. Using statistical methods, Giles and Khabsa estimated that at least 114 million English-language scholarly documents are accessible on the Web, of which Google Scholar has nearly 100 million. They estimate that at least 27 million (24 percent) are freely available since they do not require a subscription or payment of any kind. The estimates are limited to English documents only.

Giles’ and Khabsa’s study, Giles said, is the “first to use statistical, rigorous techniques in doing these estimations.” The researchers conducted their study using capture-recapture methods, which were pioneered in ecology and derive their name from censuses of wildlife in which several animals are captured, marked, released and subject to recapture. The technique examines the degree of overlap between two or more methods of ascertainment and uses a simple formula to estimate the total size of the population. Since their study was not longitudinal, Giles said, he and Khabsa plan to do another capture in the future to verify their results.

Giles’ interest in determining the number of scholarly documents on the Web was inspired by more than just curiosity — as a developer of various novel search engines and digital libraries, there are practical implications for his research. CiteSeer, a public search engine and digital library for scientific and academic papers, primarily in the fields of computer and information science, was created by Giles, Kurt Bollacker and Steve Lawrence in 1997 while they were at the NEC Research Institute (now NEC Labs), in Princeton, New Jersey, CiteSeer's goal was to actively crawl and harvest academic and scientific documents on the Web and use autonomous citation indexing to permit querying by citation or by document, ranking them by citation impact. CiteSeer, which is often considered to be the first automated citation indexing system, was considered a predecessor of academic search tools such as Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search. Released in 2008, CiteSeerX was loosely based on the previous CiteSeer search engine and digital library and is built with a new open source infrastructure, SeerSuite, and new algorithms and their implementations. While CiteSeerX has retained CiteSeer’s focus on computer and information science, it has recently been expanding into other scholarly domains such as economics, medicine and physics. One of the motivations for determining the number of scholarly documents on the Web, Giles said, is to increase the number of papers in CiteSeerX.

A significant finding in their study, Giles and Khabsa wrote in their paper, is that almost one in four of Web accessible scholarly documents are freely and publicly available. The researchers used Google Scholar to estimate this percentage because Scholar provides a direct link to the publicly available document next to each search result where a link is available. The findings are important, Giles said, because publicly available documents carry more weight in the research community. Governments, especially those in Europe, fund a lot of scientific research and don’t want papers not to be freely available. In addition, he said, it's been shown that freely available papers are much more likely to be cited than those that are not.

By having an idea of how many scholarly documents are on the Web as well as how many are freely available, Giles said, researchers can be better equipped to manage scholarly document research and related projects.

"It was surprising to see how many scholarly documents were digitized and how many were freely available,” Giles said. “But keep in mind, these estimates were only for those written in English. How many are there in other languages, more or less than English?"

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6 Great tools for content curation - Daily Genius

6 Great tools for content curation - Daily Genius | Notebook | Scoop.it

"I read recently that content curation is dead. I have a few different arguments against this concept, but for now, I’ll keep it short and sweet: Content curation is not dead, and while the debate over curating content online vs creating new content will rage on and on, curating content for other reasons is still going strong.

 That said, there are a lot of different ways to go about content curation, so we’ve test driven a few different tools so you can figure out which might work best for you whether you’re curating content for work projects, assigning it as a school project, for your own professional development, or personal interests."


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magnus sandberg's curator insight, October 6, 3:31 AM

I'm rescooping this for three reasons. First, the term "curation" is fairly new to me and it is nice to see how different forms it can take. Secondly, I read so many blogposts entitled "10 tools for this" or "35 reasons for that". It is nice too see one of those where all of the 6 tools are actually great. Third, the fact that I actually have experience with three of the six tools makes me feel good. So enjoy :) 

Olga Boldina's curator insight, October 6, 6:42 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Michail Darley's curator insight, October 9, 1:32 AM

What sort of learning occurs when we curate content? Well it depends on how carefully, intelligently and awarely we do it. These tools provide the how.

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Le site du gouvernement fait peau neuve - 01net

Le site du gouvernement fait peau neuve - 01net | Notebook | Scoop.it
01net Le site du gouvernement fait peau neuve 01net Epurée, très visuelle et responsive design (pour une meilleure consultation sur les terminaux mobiles), l'interface met en valeur le contenu qui, lui, repose sur les rubriques traditionnelles que...
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

technologie scoop.it pour la curation?!!

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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Research Tools Box
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Proof over promise: Moving citation metric systems beyond journal impact towards a career impact approach.

Proof over promise: Moving citation metric systems beyond journal impact towards a career impact approach. | Notebook | Scoop.it
Proof over promise: Moving citation metric systems beyond journal impact towards a career impact approach.

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

at last... but HLA acronym is already in use

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Beaune, The Beautiful Capital Of Burgundy Wine - Huffington Post

Beaune, The Beautiful Capital Of Burgundy Wine - Huffington Post | Notebook | Scoop.it
Beaune, The Beautiful Capital Of Burgundy Wine Huffington Post Outside those city walls, within minutes' drive, is the 60-mile Route des Grand Crus that take you along the slopes of 38 communities in the Côte de Beaune and Côte de Nuits, with...
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Sciencescape in the Future of Scientific Research

Sciencescape in the Future of Scientific Research | Notebook | Scoop.it
Sciencescape is a startup that is poised to become the next big thing in research itself, as a whole. Molyneux is not an entrepreneur.
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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Medical Education Canada
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Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection

Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection | Notebook | Scoop.it

“I am an adjunct faculty for several teacher education and educational technology programs. I have been so for a few decades. During that time I have noticed the changing nature of student behavio...”


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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, September 13, 11:57 PM
Carol Dweck's work on mindset is important for teachers. Adding reflection is not always easy, but is worthwhile.
Suvi Salo's curator insight, September 14, 2:14 AM

Opiskelijan/oppilaan oman opiskelun käsiohjelma.

Viivahtää kannattaa eritoten kohdassa-->"Did I spend enough time to do quality work?"

Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from C@fé des Sciences
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Pourquoi dormir?

Pourquoi dormir? | Notebook | Scoop.it
De toutes les fonctions vitales -respirer, manger, s’accoupler…- le sommeil est sans doute le seul qui laisse encore perplexe.

Via Goulu
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

cartoon attractif et synthèse intéressante

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40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire | Notebook | Scoop.it
2000 years ago today, the Roman Emperor Augustus died. His reign marked the start of a 200-year period of peace and prosperity for the empire.

Via Pasi Lintinen, Aki Puustinen
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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from L'actualité de la veille et de la curation
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Manuel de formation sur la veille informationnelle

Manuel de formation sur la veille informationnelle | Notebook | Scoop.it

Netvibes, Diigo, Pearltrees, Scoop.it !, Visualping et j’en passe, autant de noms sur lesquels nous sommes déjà tombés au gré de nos « pérégrinations » sur la toile. Mais, savons-nous seulement ce à quoi ils servent ? Ou même comment procéder pour assurer une veille efficace ? Quelles en sont les étapes clés ? Quels sont les outils nécessaires ? Autant de questions et bien d’autres dont les réponses se trouve dans chacune des 26 pages de ce document particulièrement précis et bien élaboré, illustrations et captures d’écran à l’appui.

 


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Louis Gourdain's curator insight, October 21, 2:54 PM

Manuel très complet sur la veille informationnelle.

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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | Notebook | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.


This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).


Tags: Europe, energy, remote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.


Via Seth Dixon
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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 16, 8:42 PM

Some very good points are brought up in this article.  Like most others I did not think that the Nordic states were huge consumers of electricity.  They however talk about how the cost of electricity because of alternative energy sources is a lot cheaper than it is in the United States.  Also they are at a much more northern latitude than we are, which means longer darker winters and nights.  This darkness creates a need for the use of more lights.  Even with the larger use of electricity the idea to keep in mind is that they are using a lot more renewable energy sources therefore producing less greenhouse gasses in the process.

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| UPtv, la WebTV de l'Université de Poitiers

| UPtv, la WebTV de l'Université de Poitiers | Notebook | Scoop.it
Colloques, conférences, reportages : l'Université de Poitiers vous propose la retransmission des évènements marquants de l'établissement.
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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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How English became language of science

How English became language of science | Notebook | Scoop.it
Two Norwegian scientists have won the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine - for work published in the English language. Historian of science Michael Gordin explains why they wrote in the language of Dickens and Twain rather than Ibsen and Hamsun.

Permafrost, oxygen, hydrogen - it all looks like science to me.

But these terms actually have origins in Russian, Greek and French.

Today, though, if a scientist is going to coin a new term, it's most likely in English. And if they are going to publish a new discovery, it is most definitely in English.

Look no further than the Nobel Prize awarded for physiology and medicine to Norwegian couple May-Britt and Edvard Moser. Their research was written and published in English.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

The story of the 20th Century is not so much the rise of English as the serial collapse of German as the up-and-coming language of scientific communication”

Michael Gordin
Princeton University
This was not always so.

"If you look around the world in 1900, and someone told you, 'Guess what the universal language of science will be in the year 2000', you would first of all laugh at them. It was obvious that no one language would be the language of science, but a mixture of French, German and English would be the right answer," says Princeton University's Rosengarten professor of modern and contemporary history Michael Gordin.

Gordin's upcoming book, Scientific Babel, explores the history of language and science. He says that English was far from the dominant scientific language in 1900. The dominant language was German.

"So the story of the 20th Century is not so much the rise of English as the serial collapse of German as the up-and-coming language of scientific communication," Gordin says.

You may think of Latin as the dominant language of science. And for many, many years it was the universal means of communication in Western Europe - from the late medieval period to the mid-17th Century. Then it began to fracture. Latin became one of many languages in which science was done.

The first person to publish extensively in his native language, according to Gordin, was Galileo. Galileo wrote in Italian and was then translated to Latin so that more scientists might read his work.


Two boys watch a scientist perform an experiment in a Bayer Group laboratory in Germany
Fast forward to the 20th Century. How did English come to dominate German in the realm of science?

"The first major shock to the system of basically having a third of science published in English, a third in French and a third in German - although it fluctuated based on field, and Latin still held out in some places - was World War One, which had two major impacts," Gordin says.

After World War One, Belgian, French and British scientists organised a boycott of scientists from Germany and Austria. They were blocked from conferences and weren't able to publish in Western European journals.

"Increasingly, you have two scientific communities, one German, which functions in the defeated [Central Powers] of Germany and Austria, and another that functions in Western Europe, which is mostly English and French," Gordin explains.

It's that moment in history, he adds, when international organisations to govern science, such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, were established. And those newly established organisations begin to function in English and French. German, which was the dominant language of chemistry, was written out.



Hear more

List to the original radio broadcast on PRI's The World, a co-production with the BBC.


The second effect of World War One took place in the US. Starting in 1917 when the US entered the war, there was a wave of anti-German hysteria that swept the country.

"At this moment something that's often hard to keep in mind is that large portions of the US still speak German," Gordin says.

In Ohio, Wisconsin and Minnesota there were many, many German speakers. World War One changed all that.

"German is criminalised in 23 states. You're not allowed to speak it in public, you're not allowed to use it in the radio, you're not allowed to teach it to a child under the age of 10," Gordin explains.

The Supreme Court overturned those anti-German laws in 1923, but for years they were the law of the land. What that effectively did, according to Gordin, was decimate foreign language learning in the US.


German-born physicist Albert Einstein taught and researched in the US
"In 1915 Americans were teaching foreign languages and learning foreign languages about the same level as Europeans were," Gordin says. "After these laws go into effect, foreign language education drops massively. Isolationism kicks in in the 1920s, even after the laws are overturned, and that means people don't think they need to pay attention to what happens in French or in German."

This results in a generation of future scientists who come of age with limited exposure to foreign languages.

That was also the moment, according to Gordin, when the American scientific establishment started to take over dominance in the world.

"And you have a set of people who don't speak foreign languages," said Gordin, "They're comfortable in English, they read English, they can get by in English because the most exciting stuff in their mind is happening in English. So you end up with a very American-centric, and therefore very English-centric, community of science after World War Two."

You can see evidence of this world history embedded into scientific terms themselves, Gordin says.

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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Power of Content Curation
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Content Curation Survey 2014 #contentcuration #stats

The results of the content curation survey 2014. Get the insights on the content curation industry. 282 people took part in this survey.


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

Scoop.it is first! but too few researchers, teachers, studants are still using it

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Brian Fanzo's curator insight, October 6, 2:14 PM

Great Data here.. embrace the power of Content Curation! 

Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Leadership Think Tank
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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | Notebook | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks, Suvi Salo, Aki Puustinen
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Scoop.it on the Web
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What the Heck is Scoop.it?

What the Heck is Scoop.it? | Notebook | Scoop.it

It’s a user-friendly content curation tool with a social component, creating a one-stop environment for learning, sharing and connecting. (...)
There are many things about Scoop.it that I love. Its Pinterest-like boards provide the headline, image and the first few lines of copy, allowing for a quick scan of content. Scoop.it’s suggested content is always spot on (...) it’s easy (and the integration with other social networks is great)."


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Marc Rougier's curator insight, October 4, 3:12 AM

Thanks much Stacy Firth for this description of Scoop.it (and thanks for the positive comments!). Very accurate.


And yes Marketers are the number one users of Scoop.it!


As a complement, integration with Wordpress, branding (up to white lable) and analytics are probably the most popular benefits of the premium plans.


Indeed there is a social component to Scoop.it: the community of curators is leveraged to discover content and engage with like-minded people. It's secondary to the prime mission (publishing-by-curation platform), but we'll take into account the remarks about upgrading this social dimension. Noted!


PS: I like the title and the concept of this series :)

Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Research Tools Box
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York University Libraries » Academic Search Engine Optimization


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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

add scoop.it for curation

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scooped | IMMpress Magazine

scooped | IMMpress Magazine | Notebook | Scoop.it
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

use scoop.it not to get scooped if you want to keep abreast of scientific information

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Academic Research Platform Sciencescape Raises $2.5M, Partners With Educational Publisher Elsevier | TechCrunch

Academic Research Platform Sciencescape Raises $2.5M, Partners With Educational Publisher Elsevier | TechCrunch | Notebook | Scoop.it
Canadian startup Sciencescape has just closed a $2.5 million round of funding, and is considering extending it into a $3 million round since it was..
Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's insight:

researchgate 35M USD

but no human curation!

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Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away…

I’m coming to see student focus as a collaborative process. It’s me and them working to create a classroom where the students who want to focus have the best shot at it, in a world increasingly hostile to that goal.


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Estonia’s Biotech : Trade Secrets

Estonia’s Biotech : Trade Secrets | Notebook | Scoop.it
Estonia's tech prowess is now paying off in biotech, esp in genomics, immunology, cancer via @NatureBiotech http://t.co/GuhOtUcHBC
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Rescooped by Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM from Economie de l'innovation
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Innovation : les recettes de six gourous

Dans le paysage de la théorie économique, de Schumpeter à Christensen voici quelques têtes chercheuses célèbres qui ont donné à l’innovation ses lettres de noblesse, en conceptualisant les moteurs de la créativité et les conditions de sa réussite. Retrouvez aussi le « Spécial Innovation » d’Enjeux Les Echos, septembre 2014.
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