Donor Cultivation and Management
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Donor Cultivation and Management
We want to collect the most important information on how your organization can raise money and recruit volunteers to do the amazing work you do. So we've put it all into this blog. If you have something to suggest please do!
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Google Search Results Now Prominently Feature Nonprofit Google+ Pages

Google Search Results Now Prominently Feature Nonprofit Google+ Pages | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

And yet another reason why your nonprofit can not ignore Google+… the Google Knowledge Graph which now prominently features information about nonprofit organizations on the right-hand side of Google Search results. Data is pulled from multiple sources including Wikipedia,GuideStar and of course Google+ Pages.  As a result, nonprofits must ensure that their Wikipedia Page and GuideStar Profile are current and understand that simply being active on Google+ makes it more likely that your nonprofit will gain new Google+ followers and increased exposure in Google Search. Finally, for those nonprofits that are using Google+ Local, your reviews and location details are now prominently featured in Google Search results as well.

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Data Storytelling: The Ultimate Collection of Resources – Juice Analytics

Data Storytelling: The Ultimate Collection of Resources – Juice Analytics | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

The hot new concept in data visualization is “data storytelling”; some are calling it the next evolution of visualization (I’m one of them). However, we’re early in the discussion and there are more questions than answers:

Is data storytelling more than a catchy phrase?Where does data storytelling fit into the broader landscape of data exploration, visualization, and presentation?How can the traditional tools of storytelling improve how we communicate with data?Is it more about story-telling or story-finding?

Many of the bright minds in the data visualization field have started to tackle these questions — and it is something that we’ve been exploring at Juice in our work. Below you’ll find a collection of some of the best blog posts, presentations, research papers, and other resources that take on this topic.

Note: I’ve excluded a lot of excellent sites and articles that use the phase data storytelling, but treat it as fresh way to talk about data visualization.

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$20 million pours into One Fund Boston to help victims of Marathon bombings - The Boston Globe

$20 million pours into One Fund Boston to help victims of Marathon bombings - The Boston Globe | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

More than $20 million — and counting — has poured into One Fund Boston in the week since twin bombs exploded during the Boston Marathon, and the goal is to get that money into the hands of those in need as quickly as possible.

 

Checks have arrived from around the globe, with businesses donating millions and children donating dollars, Mayor Thomas M. Menino said Tuesday, hours after meeting with bombing victims.

 

“It’s so important to keep those affected by this tragedy as our number one priority,” Menino said. “We’ll get through this together. We’ll help you move forward. We’ll support you during these difficult times.”

 

The $20 million will help the 264 people injured when two bombs made from pressure cookers blew up, piercing stomachs, heads, arms, and legs with projectiles. The money will help victims cope with the financial cost of recovery. Limbs were amputated. Eardrums were punctured. Psyches were smashed. Three people died in the blasts.

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Charity Navigator: Boston Marathon Bombing Victims Funds

Boston Marathon Bombing Victims FundsThere are several movements afoot to collect funds in relation to the Boston Marathon Bombing. None of them, so far, are in connection with charities that have received high ratings from Charity Navigator. We list them here, with the information we have been able to obtain about each, to help inform potential donors. However, we caution that gifts to these funds carry more risk than gifts to a well-established, fully vetted charity. TUGG This fundraising appeal promises that “all proceeds will be donated completely to programs working with victims of the attacks. We are consulting with the Mayor's office, the hospitals that cared for the patients, and other responder teams to assess the most pertinent needs and to deliver funding directly to those impacted”TUGG is a 501 c 3 public charity, but it is too small yet for Charity Navigator to rate.In 2011, TUGG spent $84k on fundraising and nothing on administrative fees or program fees (this is the category that charities show their spending on their charitable mission).The charity is missing many of our Accountability and Transparencymetrics including (but not limited to): no conflict of interest policy,  it hasn’t completed an  audit by an independent auditor with an audit oversight committee, does not have at least 5 independent voting Board members, the Board members aren’t listed on its site, no financial statements orForms 990 found on its site and we could find no evidence of a donor privacy policy on its site. While it may not be unusual for a small charity to not have all of these items in place, we do think it is important for donors to know that TUGGs is missing many of these good governance policies and procedures which help ensure the ethical behavior of charities and proper stewardship of donor dollars.The One FundThis fundraising effort was established on April 16th by Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Tom Menino “to help the people most affected by the tragic events that occurred in Boston on April 15, 2013.”The group has applied for nonprofit status, but does not yet have it.  Thenotice about the fund’s creation does properly note that “although the Fund cannot guarantee that the IRS will make a determination that the organization qualifies as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity, if approval is received within the expected time frame, the determination will be retroactive to the date of the Fund’s formation.” Readers of this blog know that the IRS hands out nonprofit status like it is giving away candy so it is highly likely that the fund’s nonprofit status will be approved.We’ve seen similar efforts after other disasters, including Superstorm Sandy in which the Governor of NJ and his wife started a fund. At the time, it too did not have nonprofit status (it does now). It has been the subject of some criticism – which Governor Christie has responded to.We generally recommend that donors not support brand new charities in a time of crisis, but we recognize that many donors will want to support this fund. Hopefully, the caliber of the leaders who have created the fund, in combination with the media scrutiny it is sure to receive, will help ensure that the fund does as it promises it will do.And to recap yesterday’s blog, here are some things to keep in mind in your efforts to support a Boston Marathon Bombing related fund:
Collectively, we donors have the power to hold these funds accountable for distributing the funds to the victims in a timely manner! That’s not to say we don’t want the funds to take enough time to ensure the money is going to real victims in need, but we also don’t want years to pass before the funds are released.Be suspicious of online appeals – especially in light of the fact that 100s of new website URLS have popped up since the bombing that use keywords related to the tragedy.Seems silly to have to say, but remember, a victim isn't going to know your personal email address to send you a direct appeal for help. This happens after every tragedy and sadly, some people, giving from their heart, don’t stop to think before they click on an email and give their personal financial information.
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Make your materials clear for older donors - Information, research and resources for fundraisers and their leaders

Make your materials clear for older donors - Information, research and resources for fundraisers and their leaders | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

To keep your print pieces with these groups clear and readable, follow these tips from CNIB:

Use high contrast colours for text and background. Good examples are black or dark blue text on a white or yellow background, or white/yellow text on a black/dark blue background.Printed material is most readable in black and white. If you use coloured text, restrict it to things like titles, headlines or highlighted material.Bigger is better. Keep your text large, preferably between 12 and 18 points, depending on the font (point size varies between fonts). Consider your audience when choosing point size.Leading is the space between lines of text and should be at least 25 to 30 per cent of the point size. This lets readers move more easily to the next line of text. Heavier typefaces will require slightly more leading.Avoid complicated or decorative fonts. Choose standard fonts with easily-recognizable upper and lower-case characters. Arial and Verdana are good choices.Opt for fonts with medium heaviness and avoid light type with thin strokes. When emphasizing a word or passage, use a bold or heavy font. Italics or upper-case letters are not recommended.Don’t crowd your text: keep a wide space between letters. Choose a monospaced font rather than one that is proportionally spaced.Break text into columns to make it easier to read. That will require less eye movement and less peripheral vision. Use wide binding margins or spiral bindings if possible. Flat pages work best for vision aids such as magnifiers.Use a matte or non-glossy finish to cut down on glare. Reduce distractions by not using watermarks or complicated background designs.Use distinctive colours, sizes and shapes on the covers of materials to make them easier to tell apart.
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Visual Storytelling--The Do's And Don'ts Of Infographic Design - Smashing Magazine

Visual Storytelling--The Do's And Don'ts Of Infographic Design - Smashing Magazine | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
Infographics are visual representations of information, or “data viz” as the cool kids call it these days.

 

Here's a great article on how to create infographics, or tell a story using 'data viz.'

 

Translating data into a story is tough work and this article gives us some fabulous tips on how to do it.

 

Not a graphic designer? Don't worry -- as a business person the more you know about how to create a great data viz story, the better you can tell a graphic designer or graphic scriber what you want.

 

Another reason I like this article is because it actually mentions the need to create a storyline for your visual, and know before had what the key message is you are trying to deliver.

 

The storytelling points the article leaves out are the storytelling devices of metaphor, analogy, contrast, and sensory material that are critical to a story's and an infographic's success.  These pieces are implied in the article, but need more direct discussion about.

 

Use this article as a great guide.  And if you want more detail, go dig into "Visualize This" by Nathan Yau (although it can be pretty technical).


Via Karen Dietz, Beth Kanter
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Five questions every nonprofit donor should ask

Five questions every nonprofit donor should ask | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

Donors wishing to contribute their time and treasure to nonprofits face a vast array of choices. After all, there are more than 1.6 million nonprofit organizations in the United States that would be delighted to accept their resources. The challenge for donors becomes how to make the right match.

 

In order to make the best choices and enhance their experiences, philanthropists need to do some research, either on their own or with the help of a professional adviser. Nonprofits need to make sure that the answers to donors' questions are complete and easily accessible. These questions include:

1. What is the nonprofit's purpose?

2. Is the nonprofit's financial picture transparent?

3. What outcomes result from the nonprofit's work?

4. Does the nonprofit provide timely updates?

5. Does the nonprofit appreciate its donors?


DonorSnap's insight:

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I Was Afraid of This: E-Newsletter Goals

I Was Afraid of This: E-Newsletter Goals | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
I really, really appreciate everyone who took the time to answer my recent survey questions about email newsletter goals and metrics — more than 600 of you!
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SocialFish | [Cool Infographic Friday] Social CRM: The Next Generation of Fundraising

From the Avectra blog: “Social CRM takes traditional donor management to the next level by creating one integrated database that captures and analyzes rich historical data and seamlessly includes new social data.
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Why charities should be using mobile phones to connect with donors

Why charities should be using mobile phones to connect with donors | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
Charities who allow regular giving by SMS can communicate with their supporters in a more cost-effective and direct way, says Paul de Gregorio (Charities of any size can make mobile giving work for them http://t.co/POjUGUBFtj...
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Ten Years On: Are Donors Different? Were They Ever? (SSIR)

Ten Years On: Are Donors Different? Were They Ever? (SSIR) | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

"What if donors just don’t care about nonprofit performance? Why measure? These questions as relevant—and as unanswered—today as they were when Katie Cunningham and Marc Ricks posed them almost 10 years ago in their Stanford Social Innovation Review Summer 2004 article. I started blogging about philanthropy in 2006, and for quite some time I was taken in by a doubly untrue meme: “Today, donors care about impact.” It’s the meme that launched Cunningham’s and Ricks’ research project on what measures would be most useful to nonprofits and donors.

 

What the two authors found—and what I eventually learned all too painfully myself—was that donors didn’t really care about nonprofit performance or impact. The duo interviewed dozens of individual donors, working primarily in the finance industry, who gave large amounts. They found common beliefs: there wasn’t much difference between nonprofits, any giving was good, and performance measures were a waste of time and money. Most importantly, they found that the donors picked nonprofits based on personal relationships, not performance."

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Is the fundraising community in denial about donor irritation?

Is the fundraising community in denial about donor irritation? | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
It has become commonplace to accost and besiege donors but in the long term it's damaging the reputation of fundraising, says Joe Saxton (RT @GdnVoluntary: Is the fundraising community in denial about donor irritation?
DonorSnap's insight:

This has some good tips and things to think about with fundraising on a 1 on 1 level.

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Video And Mobile Devices | NTEN

Video And Mobile Devices | NTEN | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

Understanding what you need to do with video on mobile devices starts with a basic understanding of the principles of mobile marketing. Because mobiles have a small screen and often more limited download speed and bandwidth restrictions, you are well advised to deliver a more focused and simplified experience in your mobile content.

 

 

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2013 NTC Round-Up: Your Takeaways

2013 NTC Round-Up: Your Takeaways | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

Whew, what an NTC! Now that we've had a chance to catch a cat (dog?) nap and dusted the snow off, we want to share the huge outpouring of blog posts, videos, pictures, and other media from the NTEN community.

We've been reading, reflecting, getting inspired, and learning a lot from all of you. Our hope is that you can do the same with this compilation.

All of you - the community - are the special sauce that makes the NTC the amazing event it is.

 

If we missed your post, our apologies! We would love to share it, so if you see any media we missed, please let us know in the comments!

 

NTC in Numbers

It just wouldn't be a post-NTC update if we didn't share some of the highlights in numbers!

Number of:

Registered Attendees: 1671Speakers: 250Online NTC Attendees:147Countries represented: 13 (US, Canada, UK, Korea, Australia, Switzerland, Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Ireland, Nepal, Mexico, and Ghana)13NTC tweets during the conference: 3000 from 806 unique tweeters from over 128 locations (thanks, Chris Tuttle for these cool visual charts)Karaoke songs with NTEN staff embarrassing themselves: 2Puppies that made it there despite the weather: 1 (and a cute one as you can see)
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How to Communicate in Midst of Tragedy | Nonprofit Marketing | Getting Attention

How to Communicate in Midst of Tragedy | Nonprofit Marketing | Getting Attention | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
 1. Immediately—Get Off Auto-Pilot 2. Immediately—But Don’t Go Dark Either 3. Immediately—Activate Your Relevancy Lens4. Immediately—Show You Care & Offer Right-Now Help5. Immediately—Pause Scheduled Outreach Till You Review6. A.S.A.P—Review Your Marketing & Fundraising Plans for the Next 10-14 Days7. A.S.A.P.—Share Your Revised Approach With  Colleagues & Ask Them to Share What They Hear8. Next 10 to 14 Days—Move Forward With Your Ear Close to the Ground9. By End of April—Craft a Crisis Communications Plan That Includes Shared Tragedies Like This One


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President Obama’s FY2014 Federal Budget as a Statement of Values: Its Message to Nonprofits

President Obama’s FY2014 Federal Budget as a Statement of Values: Its Message to Nonprofits | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

There have long been debates about the federal budget as a “moral” document that simultaneously reflects and molds our nation’s priorities. The discussion of morality in the federal budget disintegrates as competing definitions come to the fore: whether it is better or worse in moral terms to have a long term deficit, or whether observers think that specific budget lines comport to their personal or family views of morality. In this Cohen Report, following last week’s review of President Obama’s budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2014, there are no high-minded statements of morality. Rather, we ask what the budget says on a number of variables, often overlooked, critical to building the capacity and productivity of the nonprofit sector.

 

While nonprofit leadership organizations, for reasons that are increasingly difficult to understand, attempt to galvanize the nonprofit sector to laser-focus its attention around potential modifications to the charitable deduction, this analysis asks what government and society plan to do with, and for, bellwether budget items for nonprofits that address the needs of poor people. It’s that simple.

 

This analysis is based on the conception of nonprofits as something other than temporary gap-fillers mitigating some of the dysfunctional elements of the private markets. To the contrary, nonprofits reflect values deep in American society about organizations motivated by something other than profit-maximization and multi-million-dollar CEO salaries. Nonprofits deliver what the private markets on their own simply won’t and don’t, and in some cases they partner with private investors to put private capital into productive, socially significant uses. What does the Administration’s proposed FY2014 budget say to Americans about President Obama’s (or President-Obama-plus-his-executive-team’s) vision of what government should do and provide to nonprofits?

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Do Nonprofits Really Limit Advertising Because of Pressure to Cut Overhead?

Do Nonprofits Really Limit Advertising Because of Pressure to Cut Overhead? | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
The writings of observers like Dan Pallotta suggest that nonprofits shy away from investing in advertising because of pressures to limit their overhead.
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Why Small Donations Are Priceless

Why Small Donations Are Priceless | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
building an army of people that actually donate is more important than the dollar amount they contribute. A handful of seeds eventually will become a forest.

Via Terese Babcock
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WATCH: Google Award Helps Nonprofits Fight Human Trafficking

WATCH: Google Award Helps Nonprofits Fight Human Trafficking | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

Three organizations fighting global slavery and trafficking were collectively awarded $3 million by Google last week.

 

The money comes in the form of a Global Impact Award, which supports nonprofits that use technology to solve problems. Polaris Project, Liberty Asia and La Strada International are currently collaborating on a "Global Human Trafficking Hotline Network," which analyzes data from local hotlines to crack down on the lucrative -- and destructive -- practice of slavery.

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Google Adds Non-Profit Information To Knowledge Graph, Gives Them A Boost With Google+ Follow Buttons | TechCrunch

Google Adds Non-Profit Information To Knowledge Graph, Gives Them A Boost With Google+ Follow Buttons | TechCrunch | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

"We’ve just started to add information about nonprofits to the Knowledge Graph. When you search for a nonprofit organization on Google.com, you will start to see information to the right side of the search results that highlights the nonprofit’s financials, cause, and recent Google+ posts. Start following the organization on Google+ directly from the panel by clicking the Follow button. To learn more about related nonprofits, click on one of the organizations under “People also search for” and a carousel of similar organizations will appear at the top of the search results. Over time, we’ll continue to work on bringing more nonprofit information into your search experience."

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Resources: Introduction to development and fundraising

Resources: Introduction to development and fundraising | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

For U.S. nonprofits and the people who work with them, the word "development" has two distinct meanings. On the one hand, it is used to refer in the most general sense to the ways nonprofit organizations supplement their earned income with donations, grants, sponsorships and gifts-in-kind. In this sense, it is common for nonprofits in the U.S. to have a development department where staff conduct fundraising campaigns and manage related activities. Of course, the same sorts of activities are found in nonprofit organizations in many parts of the world. The work is similar though the vocabulary for describing it varies from place to place.

 

The word development also can be used to point to an important group of nonprofit organizations — those that work around the world to strengthen low-income countries and improve the economic prospects for their citizens. This page discusses development in the former sense.

Nonprofit finances
Types of fundraising
Other sources for advice and information
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What Nonprofits Can Learn from Consumer Reports and the Potato Chip

What Nonprofits Can Learn from Consumer Reports and the Potato Chip | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
New data sets are being collected and often opened up to the public every day that have relevance for the work of social good, but the information often exists in silos – there are thousands of “data islands” that aren’t easy to combine or analyze.
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Poorest people give highest proportion of income to charity, says study

Poorest people give highest proportion of income to charity, says study | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it

"Professor Yaojun Li, from the Institute for Social Change at the University of Manchester, analysed 105,731 replies to the government's annual Citizenship Survey over the 10 years to 2011.

 

Li presented his findings for the first time at the British Sociological Association's annual conference in London today. He said the average amount people donated in the four weeks before being questioned in 2010/11 was £16, compared with £15 in the same period in 2007/08. The 2010/11 figure has been adjusted downwards to take inflation into account.

 

But the overall proportion of those donating has fallen since before the recession. Of those questioned in 2005, 79 per cent said they had donated to charity, compared with 76 per cent during 2007/08 and 72 per cent in 2010/11.

 

"Britons are overall quite generous, but the current crisis is taking a toll," said Li. "It’s not all bad news – although fewer are giving, the total amount they are giving is roughly the same.

 

"The claims of a broken society are not well grounded, but the evidence also shows that the government needs to do more to sustain and increase the level of participation in civic engagement, voluntary help and charitable giving."

 

Li found that the poorest tend to give the highest proportion of their income. In 2010/11, the poorest 20 per cent of those surveyed gave 3.2 per cent of their monthly income to charity, while the richest 20 per cent gave just 0.9 per cent. The remaining 60 per cent of people gave less than 2 per cent.

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Four types of corporate giving programs

Four types of corporate giving programs | Donor Cultivation and Management | Scoop.it
Four types of corporate giving programs

U.S. corporations gave over $14 billion to nonprofits in 2011 (Source: Giving USA’s 2012 Annual Report on Philanthropy for 2011). Learn how your organization can take advantage of the many forms of corporate giving!

Here are four of the most prevalent types of donations that your nonprofit can benefit from:  

1. Community Grants
Through community grant programs, corporations support their local communities by providing funding to organizations that work to improve the lives of employees, customers, and local neighborhoods.  In most cases, organizations apply directly to the company by providing an overview of how the grant will be used.

Typically, these grants are restricted to organizations located in regions the company has a physical presence. For instance, Walmart offers community grants to local organizations. The amount of each grant typically ranges from $250 – $5,000 and is awarded by a team of associates who work at each store.

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