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Raise money with social data

Fundraisers see great successes like Charity:Water, their eyes get wide, and they inevitably ask me the question: “How can we use social media to raise more money?” - See more at: http://www.npengage.com/fundraising-integrated-marketing/raise-money-with-social-media-start-with-social-data/#sthash.j6R1D54Z.dpuf
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Fundraisers see great successes like Charity:Water, their eyes get wide, and they inevitably ask me the question: “How can we use social media to raise more money?” - See more at: http://www.npengage.com/fundraising-integrated-marketing/raise-money-with-social-media-start-with-social-data/#sthash.j6R1D54Z.dpuf
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Is Big Data Changing the Scope of Nonprofits? - Spinnakr Blog

Is Big Data Changing the Scope of Nonprofits? - Spinnakr Blog | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
Big data is a term typically used in the context of a corporate and internet enterprises. But, can big data change the way nonprofits work? Because most...
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How data science is helping charities save lives and their budgets

How data science is helping charities save lives and their budgets | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
Rayid Ghani might be best known for leading the Obama for America data science team, but his latest mission is to bring that experience to bear on the nonprofit world through a research director role at the University of Chicago and a startup...
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Site uses social media to track illness

Site uses social media to track illness | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — You might not consider Tweets such as "Missing the Redskins game because of the flu, ugh :( #worstday" as groundbreaking advancement in science, but Graham Dodge, founder and CEO of the disease-tracking site Sickweather.com, thinks they are.

Sickweather.com uses social media updates to follow outbreaks of the flu, allergies and other illnesses around the country. Sickweather scans Facebook and Twitter for posts about sickness and gathers the data to form an interactive map showing the areas with the most statuses about infections.

 

The Baltimore-based company launched the site in 2011, but is still in beta mode.

 

Now, Sickweather is introducing a new smartphone app in six to eight weeks that will alert users every time they are in the vicinity of a sick person. The launch is just in time for the beginning of influenza season, a fact that Dodge said is a "just a happy coincidence."

 

The Sickweather app uses a unique feature called "geosensing" to notify people when they are entering a sick zone. Soon, before you enter a Starbucks or sit on a crowded city bus, you will be able to know if some people inside have had a fever in the past 24 hours, or a chickenpox-ridden child at home.

 

"The idea of data mining social media to identify sick people and outbreaks is really cool," said Phil Fogel, 27, a user from New York City.

About the upcoming app, he said: "It sounds really awesome as a novelty, but I'm not going to avoid a place simply because it's possible that someone with the flu was there."

 

Experts in the medical field say that information gathered via social media could be helpful, but should only be used in conjunction with traditional outbreak research.

 

"We are open to that kind of thing. At this point it can't replace tried and true techniques," said Dr. Lucy Wilson, of Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "I think if it can be validated and shown to fit with surveillance trends then yes, it has that potential."

 

Data on illnesses that the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene collects from hospitals, nursing homes, jails or other institutions can take up to six months to validate before being put up on the web. While doctors react to outbreaks immediately, the case numbers aren't uploaded in real-time.

 

Wilson, chief of the department's Center For Surveillance, Infection Prevention, and Outbreak Response, also said the public health system already has various groups that use social media for markers of different health issues.

 

Although using data collected via Twitter and Facebook to follow medical trends might seem suspect to some, the team at Sickweather uses a patent-pending algorithm. The Sickweather team is also advised by Michael J. Paul and Mark Dredz of Johns Hopkins University, who created a model in their study "You Are What You Tweet" to track illness via Twitter.

 

Their equation collects certain keywords from Twitter like "flu," "sick," and "sneezing," to create a map of general locations where the most keywords appear. Although Paul and Dredz admit that Twitter doesn't always give the most scientifically accurate results, the information they do receive is valuable for getting a broad sense of where diseases are heading.

 

Using its system, Sickweather was able to predict last year's early flu season six weeks before the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dodge said.

 

Sickweather's advantage, Dodge said, is that it works in real time. Google's Flu Trends, for example, is on a 48-hour lag and reports from CDC can be several weeks behind.

 

Recently, on Sickweather's blog, it was announced that Sickweather had been tracking reports of chickenpox on social media since October 2011.

Maryland was named the No. 1 best friend of chickenpox as the state is at the top of the "Chickenpoxensie" States list.

 

Don't worry too much. This could just mean that Marylanders are more vocal on Facebook when complaining about the disease.

"The bigger point of this is that anecdotal data has a place in this world of clinical data," said Dodge. "If people think their kid has something or think they have something and they're being told this isn't true, if they can't afford the lab to get concrete results, this offers data to help people make educated guesses."

 

 


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Chief Marketing Officers See True Value in Social Media

Chief Marketing Officers See True Value in Social Media | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

Buzzword:  Social Data

 

From a survey of 100 CMOs by Bazzarvoice.  Five years ago I used to say that the value of social media was that it was a free focus group to help organizations improve what they're doing.    Now that we have more sophisicated tools for monitoring social conversations and making sense fo the data - and hopefully better skills doing this - here the quantified value.

 

Some of the survey’s most interesting statistics and findings:
Making predictions: Nearly half of CMOs have used social data to make predictions or forecasts.


Discerning trends: The areas where Chief Marketing Officers believe social data is most effective is in indicating “discernible trends or patterns that may impact the business” (83%) followed by “consumer demographics and/or psychographics” (81%).


Brand awareness: Over 82% of CMOs believe social data has a measurable impact on brand awareness.


Decision making: Over 89% say that social data has influenced their decisions and 21% of those surveyed say social data affects at least one in five decisions they make.

 

Is your nonprofit making sense of social data?


Via Beth Kanter, smfarr
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Trust Your Audience: Data Debunks Nonprofit Social Media Fears

Trust Your Audience: Data Debunks Nonprofit Social Media Fears | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
Despite the myriad good reasons to be using social media (including data indicating social media’s leading role in motivating visitation and donor support), some nonprofit organizations and m...

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How to Turn Your Stakeholders into Fundraisers: Social Fundraising and How Measurement Can Make It More Effective

How to Turn Your Stakeholders into Fundraisers: Social Fundraising and How Measurement Can Make It More Effective | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
Social fundraising is only a couple of years old, but best practices are evolving quickly as nonprofits use measurement to learn what works best.
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When nonprofits marry tried-and-true fundraising techniques with social media, social fundraising is the result.
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Lessons from Obama 2012: How Data Science Can Help Nonprofits | MIT Technology Review

Lessons from Obama 2012: How Data Science Can Help Nonprofits | MIT Technology Review | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
Data scientist Rayid Ghani helped persuade voters to reëlect President Obama. Now he’s using big data to create a groundswell of social good.
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Using Big Data and Small Data to Optimize Social Media Marketing

Using Big Data and Small Data to Optimize Social Media Marketing | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it
The need for businesses and individuals to measure their activity on social media is constantly growing as the industry is becoming more mature.

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Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions

Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

This is the second reference I've stumbled upon that talks about social media tracking/monitoring and metrics as "social data."   This is great reframing in the context of Networked Nonprofits - and measuring their activity. 

 

Here's the bit that caught my eye:

 

Whether it be for learning when is the best time to tweet for your audience or keywords that bring traffic to your website, data can be used in some form or another to influence communication strategy (including future social efforts), improve customer service (including resolving complaints), inform product development and understand consumer interests, habits and behavior.

 

In order for this to happen with nonprofits:

 

(1)  They already need to have a "data-informed" culture

(2)  They need foundational skills in collecting, analyzing, and applying social data.  This could be:

a)  Brand Monitoring

b)  Influencer Research
c)  KPI/Metrics to track performance of content on different channels, plus content analysis

 

Most importantly,  there needs to be someone on staff who is responsible for the task beyond a quick hit of looking a monthly spreadsheet.  Should also be an organizational process, given priority and importance. 

 

How does your nonprofit think about "social data" in the context of collecting data, sense-making, and applying it to decisions.


Via Beth Kanter
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Leveraging Social Media Data Across Your Entire Nonprofit

Leveraging Social Media Data Across Your Entire Nonprofit | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it

Social media typically has been isolated to a particular department (often marketing) within nonprofits. But now, its value can be realized across multiple departments in the organization.


Via Julia Campbell
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Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions

Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions | Nonprofit Data Use | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

This is the second reference I've stumbled upon that talks about social media tracking/monitoring and metrics as "social data."   This is great reframing in the context of Networked Nonprofits - and measuring their activity. 

 

Here's the bit that caught my eye:

 

Whether it be for learning when is the best time to tweet for your audience or keywords that bring traffic to your website, data can be used in some form or another to influence communication strategy (including future social efforts), improve customer service (including resolving complaints), inform product development and understand consumer interests, habits and behavior.


In order for this to happen with nonprofits:

 

(1)  They already need to have a "data-informed" culture

(2)  They need foundational skills in collecting, analyzing, and applying social data.  This could be:

a)  Brand Monitoring

b)  Influencer Research
c)  KPI/Metrics to track performance of content on different channels, plus content analysis

 

Most importantly,  there needs to be someone on staff who is responsible for the task beyond a quick hit of looking a monthly spreadsheet.  Should also be an organizational process, given priority and importance. 

 

How does your nonprofit think about "social data" in the context of collecting data, sense-making, and applying it to decisions.


Via Beth Kanter
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