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Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added)
If no farmland and no forests and no water and no fish - then what?
Curated by pdeppisch
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Newborns Commonly Are Exposed in Womb to Germ-Killing, Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

Newborns Commonly Are Exposed in Womb to Germ-Killing, Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The antibacterial compound triclosan may be common in pregnant women and infants
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The real cost of ethanol

The real cost of ethanol | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The unexpected price of something that was supposed to save you money and be good for the environment
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Climate change reflected in altered Missouri River flow, USGS report says

Climate change reflected in altered Missouri River flow, USGS report says | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Montana farmer Rocky Norby has worked the land along the Missouri River for more than 20 years, coaxing sugar beets and malted barley out of the arid ground.
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Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River

Idaho’s sewer system is the Snake River | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
As Big Ag flourishes, this massive waterway suffers.
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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon, Christian Allié
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Brave New Recycling Economy: Movement Turns Trash to Treasure - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Brave New Recycling Economy: Movement Turns Trash to Treasure - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Every piece of garbage can be turned into raw material that can be used in future products. With his influential Cradle to Cradle movement, Germany's Michael Braungart espouses a form of eco-hedonism that puts smart production before conservation.
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Glass Eel Gold Rush Casts Maine Fishermen against Scientists

Glass Eel Gold Rush Casts Maine Fishermen against Scientists | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Sky-high prices for juvenile American eels have created conflict in Maine between fishermen and fisheries biologists over the fate of the species
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Mass. To Make Big Food Wasters Lose The Landfill

Mass. To Make Big Food Wasters Lose The Landfill | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
By October, the state will have the most ambitious commercial food waste ban in the U.S. Institutions that produce more than a ton of waste a week will have to find new uses for their scraps.
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Mysterious Craters Are Just the Beginning of Arctic Surprises

Mysterious Craters Are Just the Beginning of Arctic Surprises | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Researchers are rethinking century-old observations as they witness the unexpected and peculiar perils that are emerging from thawing Arctic permafrost

Via Mariaschnee
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Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

Photo Credit: Paul Bertner

Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity. For decades, these seed collections have been guided by simple models that offer a one-size-fits-all approach for how many seeds to gather. A new study, however, has found that more careful tailoring of seed collections to specific species and situations is critical to preserving plant diversity.

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IBM Solar Collector Magnifies Sun By 2000X – These Could Provide Power To The Entire Planet | The Unbounded Spirit

IBM Solar Collector Magnifies Sun By 2000X – These Could Provide Power To The Entire Planet | The Unbounded Spirit | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

A team at IBM recently developed what they call a High Concentration Photo Voltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns, they are even claiming to be able to concentrate energy safely up to 5,000X, that’s huge.

 

The process of  trapping the sunlight produces water that can be used to produce filtered drinkable water, or used for other things like air conditioning etc. Scientists envision that the HCPVT system could provide sustainable energy and fresh water to communities all around the world.

 

“Each 1cmX1cm chip can convert 200-250 watts, on average, over a typical eight-hour day in a sunny region.

 

In the HCPVT system, instead of heating a building, the 90 degree Celsius water will pass through a porous membrane distillation system where it is then vaporized and desalinated.

 

Such a system could provide 30-40 liters of drinkable water per square meter of receiver area per day, while still generating electricity with a more than 25 percent yield or two kilowatts hours per day.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 5, 5:26 PM

Some good research on solar technology...

MJUNCKE's curator insight, August 6, 5:16 AM

Sounds good!

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Last Call at the Oasis

Last Call at the Oasis | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

"Last Call at the Oasis, now in theaters! Help aid the global water crisis.

 

The global water crisis will be the central issue facing our world this century. We can manage this problem, but only if we are willing to act now. Last Call at the Oasis is a powerful new documentary that shatters myths behind our most precious resource. This film exposes defects in the current system, shows communities already struggling with its ill-effects and highlights individuals championing revolutionary solutions during the global water crisis. Firmly establishing the global water crisis as the central issue facing our world this century, the film posits that we can manage this problem if we act now."


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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

"A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes."

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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China's massive role in illegal logging

China's massive role in illegal logging | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

China produces more wood and paper products than any nation on Earth. Sadly, much of it comes from illegal timber. Bound for China...


Via Timo Paasikunnas
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New nursery sprayer could be ‘game changer’

New nursery sprayer could be ‘game changer’ | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

Capital Press The USDA and university researchers are testing a sprayer that dramatically cuts pesticide use and drift.


Via Sylvain Rotillon
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The roads scholar

The roads scholar | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
An ecologist helps wildlife safely cross highways.
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China's air pollution scaring away expat executives

China's air pollution scaring away expat executives | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Whitney Foard Small loved China and her job as a regional director of communications for a top automaker. But after air pollution led to several stays in hospital and finally ...

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Anne Egros's curator insight, May 1, 2013 1:42 PM

Would you decline a great job offer abroad because of pollution ?

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, May 1, 2013 2:10 PM

From the article:

 

Foreigners regularly check the air quality readings put out by the U.S. Embassy and consulates on their Twitter feeds when deciding whether to go out for a run or let their children play outside.

 

The pollution has become even more of a hot topic since January, when the readings in Beijing went off the scale and beyond what is considered hazardous by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

 

At the same time, China’s state media gave unprecedented coverage to the pollution following months of growing pressure from a Chinese middle class that has become more vocal about the quality of its air.

Jenny Ebermann's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:51 PM

wow, definitely worth considering!

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Deadly Algae Are Everywhere, Thanks to Agriculture

Deadly Algae Are Everywhere, Thanks to Agriculture | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Get used to algae blooms, they may be coming to a body of water near you
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Auckland Council hypocritical on wastewater dumping

Auckland Council hypocritical on wastewater dumping | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

"Updated 8:22am: It's given the green-light to dumping waste in waterways, while asking the rest of us to "celebrate our streams".

Auckland Council has decided its contractors did nothing wrong, in repeatedly dumping wastewater in a Pukekohe stream last month."


Via Sylvain Rotillon
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Foresters Now Monitoring Tree Populations from Space [Slide Show]

Foresters Now Monitoring Tree Populations from Space [Slide Show] | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Scientists know surprisingly little about what is growing in our forests. New techniques for analyzing satellite data are about to change that
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Wildforests's curator insight, August 17, 3:26 AM

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These techniques can determine not just the type of tree but also its size. “We get longer-wavelength images that scatter more on bigger or denser trees,” Parisa says. That is useful information to SilviaTerra’s main clients: companies that buy or invest in timber who want to know where the largest reserves may be. Currently such companies own forested lands worth as much as $90 billion. Based on interest in the market, analysts say these companies could soon double their landholdings.

 

Parisa and Nova are not the only ones approaching the forest data problem this way. Companies are doing similar work in Canada, Israel and Ireland as well as in other parts of the U.S. “Ten years from now there’s going to be amazing information available for forests anywhere you want to point your mouse on a computer or anywhere you want to walk,” Parisa remarks.

 

This new technology could be a blessing to forest landowners and managers who will soon be able to better track their land’s response to climate change or spot invasive species sooner.

 

Of course there will likely always be traditional foresters like Shane Hetzler who provide data from the field to complement data harvested from satellite images. Hetzler, who works for small landowners in coastal New England, prefers the conventional means of studying forests. He hasn’t completely forsaken new technology, however. Hetzler uses smartphone apps to log the height, width, location and species of the trees he encounters during his long treks through the woods. The old way was a “rite of passage” he says, logging data in the field with pen on paper, “hoping that it wasn’t going to rain.” But, he has to admit, the new data tools “are pretty great.”

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As Animals Mingle, a Baffling Genetic Barrier

As Animals Mingle, a Baffling Genetic Barrier | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
A puzzle of just 82 letters of DNA is challenging what it means to be a species. 

In new research published in June in the journal Science, Wolf’s team has found that a surprisingly small chunk of DNA may hold the answer. A comparison of the carrion and hooded-crow genomes showed that the sequences are almost identical. Differences in just 82 DNA letters, out of a total of about 1.2 billion, appear to separate the two groups. Almost all of them are clustered in a small part of one chromosome.  “Maybe just a few genes make a species what they are,” said Chris Jiggins, a biologist at the University of Cambridge in England, who was not involved in the study. “Maybe the rest of genome can flow, so species are much more fluid than we imagined before.”

The findings are striking because they suggest that just a few genes can keep two populations apart. Something within that segment of DNA stops black crows from mating with gray ones and vice versa, creating a tenuous mating barrier that could represent one of the earliest steps in the formation of new species. “They look very different and prefer to mate with their own kind, and all of that must be controlled by these narrow regions,” Jiggins said.


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The Game Theory of Life | Quanta Magazine

The Game Theory of Life |  Quanta Magazine | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

"In what appears to be the first study of its kind, computer scientists report that an algorithm discovered more than 50 years ago in game theory and now widely used in machine learning is mathematically identical to the equations used to describe the distribution of genes within a population of organisms. Researchers may be able to use the algorithm, which is surprisingly simple and powerful, to better understand how natural selection works and how populations maintain their genetic diversity.

By viewing evolution as a repeated game, in which individual players, in this case genes, try to find a strategy that creates the fittest population, researchers found that evolution values both diversity and fitness.

Some biologists say that the findings are too new and theoretical to be of use; researchers don’t yet know how to test the ideas in living organisms. Others say the surprising connection, published Monday in the advance online version of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help scientists understand a puzzling feature of natural selection: The fittest organisms don’t always wipe out their weaker competition. Indeed, as evidenced by the menagerie of life on Earth, genetic diversity reigns."


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Water and the Future

Water and the Future | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The drought in the Southwest troubles me incredibly.

I'm here in Michigan where we seem to have an inexhaustible supply of fresh water. Six quadrillion gallons of the stuff pounding the shorelines ...

Via Sylvain Rotillon
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Eat more meat and save the world: the latest implausible farming miracle

Eat more meat and save the world: the latest implausible farming miracle | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
George Monbiot: Allan Savory tells us that increasing livestock can reduce desertification and reverse climate change – but where is the scientific evidence?
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This is climate change: Ohio’s water crisis was a man-made disaster

This is climate change: Ohio’s water crisis was a man-made disaster | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Industrial agriculture, invasive species and warming temperatures are all vital parts of this weekend's big story
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