Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment
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Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment
If no farmland and no forests and no water and no fish - then what?
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Why the pigs are dying and walking around 'drunk'

Why the pigs are dying and walking around 'drunk' | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
The death of up to 1000 pigs has been blamed on pollution associated with controversial gas mining, in a submission to a Senate inquiry into regulation of the coal seam gas industry.
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Dahr Jamail | Radioactive Water From Fukushima Is Leaking Into the Pacific

Dahr Jamail | Radioactive Water From Fukushima Is Leaking Into the Pacific | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
"Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind," Arnold Gundersen, a former nuclear industry senior vice president, told Truthout shortly after a 9.0 earthquake in Japan caused a tsunami that destroyed the cooling system of Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) nuclear plant in Fukushima, Japan.

While this statement might sound overdramatic, Gundersen may be right.
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EPA faces lawsuit over failure to regulate aircraft emissions

EPA faces lawsuit over failure to regulate aircraft emissions | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Environmental groups fed up with agency foot-dragging
Staff Report
With the airline industry and the EPA dragging their feet on limiting greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft, environmental groups this week decided to press the issue in court.
The lawsuit, filed by Earthjustice on behalf of the Center for Biological Diversity and Friends of the Earth in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, accuses the EPA of violating the Clean Air Act by unreasonably delaying action on airline emissions.
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Fossil Fuel Companies Spend $115 Million Each Year Opposing Climate Policy

Fossil Fuel Companies Spend $115 Million Each Year Opposing Climate Policy | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Major fossil fuel companies and trade groups shell out nearly $115 million a year to oppose efforts to reduce carbon emissions, according to a new report from the British research organization Influence Map.

The largest share of the money comes from the American Petroleum Institute, the country’s largest trade organization for oil and gas producers. It reportedly spends $65 million annually in efforts to block climate policy. API is followed by Exxon Mobil, which spends $27 million, and Shell, which spends $22 million a year on anti-climate advocacy. 

The rest of the money comes from smaller fossil fuel companies and trade organizations. 
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Microbots can clean up polluted water

Microbots can clean up polluted water | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it

(Phys.org)—A new study shows that a swarm of hundreds of thousands of tiny microbots, each smaller than the width of a human hair, can be deployed into industrial wastewater to absorb and remove toxic heavy metals.


Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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What Will Happen When Genetically Engineered Salmon Escape Into the Wild?

What Will Happen When Genetically Engineered Salmon Escape Into the Wild? | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
In late 2015, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the greenlight to AquaBounty, Inc., a company poised to create, produce and market an entirely new type of salmon. By combining the genes from three different types of fish, AquaBounty has made a salmon that grows unnaturally fast, reaching adult size twice as fast as its wild relative.

Never before has a country allowed any type of genetically engineered animal to be sold as food. The U.S. is stepping into new terrain, opening Pandora’s box. But are we ready for the consequences?
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The Strange Ecosystem in the Sea: Dead Whales 

The Strange Ecosystem in the Sea: Dead Whales  | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
One April day in 2013, the submersible Shinkai 6500 descended to the base of the steep São Paulo Ridge, 13,000 feet under the Atlantic…

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Germans support deposit system for coffee capsules | Environment | DW.COM | 05.04.2016

Germans support deposit system for coffee capsules | Environment | DW.COM | 05.04.2016 | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
A recent poll has found that a majority of Germans would welcome a deposit scheme to boost recycling of coffee capsules to lessen their environmental impact. But could this really happen?

Coffee pods - a scourge for environmental campaigners due to the relatively large amount of waste they generate - should be part of a deposit system to encourage people to recycle them, most Germans think.
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'Mystery voyage' of Scottish islands' red deer - BBC News

'Mystery voyage' of Scottish islands' red deer - BBC News | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
When red deer arrived on Scotland's outer islands some 5,000 years ago, they were probably brought across the ocean by humans from as far away as central Europe, a study suggests.
Researchers compared ancient and modern deer DNA across the region.
In particular, analysis of deer samples from archaeological sites in Orkney and the Outer Hebrides revealed surprisingly distinctive DNA sequences.
The animals are unlikely to have come from the mainland, the scientists say.
Even Norway and Ireland are unlikely sources, they add, suggesting seafaring Neolithic people trafficked the beasts from a mysterious and more far-flung source.
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Why Small Birds Opt For Urban Living

Why Small Birds Opt For Urban Living | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
A few years ago, Anders Pape Møller from the University of Paris-Sud walked through the small suburban town of Orsay, France, counting all the birds he saw or heard. He walked through built-up urban areas, and through forest and farmland. He found that Orsay’s birds were congregating largely in the urban zones. He found 77 percent of them within a hundred meters of the nearest house. When the repeated the census in a similar town in Denmark, he found the same thing: 87 percent of local birds were sticking close to humans.
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The worm has turned: how British insect farms could spawn a food revolution

The worm has turned: how British insect farms could spawn a food revolution | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
t could be the tumbledown, moss-covered drystone walls marking the boundaries of land that has been farmed since the arrival of the Norse settlers. Or the gentle meanderings of the river Eden through the shadows of the Cumbrian fells. Or the proximity of the Settle-Carlisle railway line. All in all, Thringill Farm seems an unlikely setting for a 21st-century food revolution.

Yet just past the 17th-century farmhouse, an incongruous sound offers a clue of unusual goings-on. From behind the large wooden door of a heavily insulated room in the corner of an outbuilding comes the distinctive rhythmic chirping of crickets. The mating call, more usually heard in the Mediterranean than in the Pennines, reveals the location of the UK’s first edible-insect farm.

Inside the room, the temperature jumps noticeably. Some 70 large plastic storage containers are lined up on wooden shelves, three high to the ceiling, each containing house crickets (Acheta domesticus). Dressed in black jeans, sweater and trainers, there is something bee-like about entomologist Howard Bell as he moves rapidly from box to box, checking on the progress of his half a million or so charges.
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Using tiny predators to tackle agricultural pests - BBC News

Using tiny predators to tackle agricultural pests - BBC News | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
A tiny mite, just 0.5mm long, it is a fearsome predator.
It eats a type of insect called thrips. These are small winged insects that generally feed on plants.
Thrips are a major agricultural pest around the world, and can damage whole fields of crops, literally sucking the life out of them. But introduce amblyseius cucumeris and you have a bloodbath and then no thrips.
For farmers who wanted to protect their fields from thrips - and the many other pests out there - the method developed in the 20th Century was to spray liberally with chemical pesticides.
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France to Ban Glyphosate Weedkillers Due to Health Risks

France to Ban Glyphosate Weedkillers Due to Health Risks | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
France is banning glyphosate mixed with certain adjuvants (additives) due to its perceived risks to human health. The move comes less than two months after Ségolène Royal, France’s minister of ecology, sustainable development and energy, called for the ban.
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Better land use one of the keys to slowing global warming

Better land use one of the keys to slowing global warming | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
GR: Carbon storage in soils equates to fertility. Over most of the Earth's land surfaces, grazing and farming lead to loss of topsoil, the upper soil layer that holds the carbon. It will be very difficult to improve the current wasteful practices since the growing human population is urgently demanding more meat and potatoes. Unlike…

Via Garry Rogers
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New study says Deepwater Horizon oil disaster caused fetal and newborn dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico

New study says Deepwater Horizon oil disaster caused fetal and newborn dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Staff Report
Scientists studying the aftermath of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico say results of a recently completed four-year study of dolphin strandings confirm that the spill took a toll on marine mammals.
“Our new findings add to the mounting evidence from peer-reviewed studies that exposure to petroleum compounds following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill negatively impacted the reproductive health of dolphin populations living in the oil spill footprint in the northern Gulf of Mexico,” said Dr. Teri Rowles, a veterinarian with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and a co-author on the study.
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Rural Water contamination- an impact of global interaction.

Rural Water contamination- an impact of global interaction. | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Over 80 percent of the water from underground wells across China’s plains is unfit for drinking because of contamination, according to statistics that alarmed many Chinese.

Via oyndrila, Giannis Tompros
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oyndrila's curator insight, April 12, 1:55 PM
Here is an article on water pollution in rural China.
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A first-blush with forest ecosystems and wildland biodiversity.

A first-blush with forest ecosystems and wildland biodiversity. | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
A forest ecosystem is one major ecologic unit that exists as a part of the total complex ecological condition.

Via American Grove, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Tea Party Wave Washes Up ‘Anti-Parks Caucus’ In Congress

Tea Party Wave Washes Up ‘Anti-Parks Caucus’ In Congress | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Members of the caucus have made statements supporting the underlying values fueling extremist attacks on public lands.

Via Garry Rogers
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Garry Rogers's curator insight, April 11, 7:09 PM
GR:  The array of interests in public lands helps prevent loss of the lands to construction and agribusiness. Because we set land use limits, it's the opposite of the "tragedy of the commons."  If public lands become private, developers quickly obtain and utilize them for profit.
National Parks, Wildernesses, Refuges, and Monuments offer partial protection to natural vegetation and wildlife and they slow the loss of soil, wildlife, habitat, and scenic beauty. Instead of converting these lands to private ownership, we should be increasing their levels of protection. The quality of the landscapes in most of these places is declining because of domestic livestock grazing. Cattle and sheep trample the soil, damage biological soil crusts, remove forage needed by wildlife, and spread invasive weeds.  
pdeppisch's comment, April 11, 9:04 PM
You gotta love American Politics! <sarcasm>
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Researchers fly over 8,000 well pads and find hundreds of methane leaks

Researchers fly over 8,000 well pads and find hundreds of methane leaks | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
As Pennsylvania’s natural gas production continues to expand, so does the possibility of potentially harmful methane emissions.

A new study from scientists in the Environmental Defense Fund’s Oil and Gas program examined the most common sites for methane leaks at oil and gas pads nationwide. A team of researchers partnered with Gas Leaks Inc., a company that uses infrared technology to inspect well pads, to fly a helicopter over thousands of pads in seven regions in the United States.

In total, the researchers flew over 8,000 pads in areas saturated by drilling, including North Dakota’s Bakken Shale and the Marcellus Shale in Southwestern Pennsylvania.
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Plankton decline hits marine food chain | Environment | DW.COM | 04.04.2016

Plankton decline hits marine food chain | Environment | DW.COM | 04.04.2016 | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Plankton is the basis for the entire marine food web - and it is under threat. From the Mediterranean to the Pacific, animals have been struggling to survive, due apparently to changes with plankton.
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Benign by design: how chemists aim to end pharmaceutical pollution of the environment | Sci-Tech | DW.COM | 07.04.2016

Benign by design: how chemists aim to end pharmaceutical pollution of the environment | Sci-Tech | DW.COM | 07.04.2016 | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
From antibiotics to hormones and pain killers - residue from drugs is found in wastewater, rivers, fish, and even in polar bear fat. But chemists say they may know how to end this environmental pollution.

The world has to change - so does the way the chemical and pharmaceutical industries work - this was the consensus at the Green and Sustainable Chemistry Conference in Berlin.
Chemists from all over the world came to the German capital to discuss how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.
"I think green chemistry can make a significant contribution towards saving the world," said James Clark, a green chemist at University of York in the UK.
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Palm Oil 'Fatbergs' as Big as Boulders Washing Up on UK Beaches

Palm Oil 'Fatbergs' as Big as Boulders Washing Up on UK Beaches | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Palm oil is already known to be an environmental blight and now we can add another item to its rap sheet. The much-maligned substance is surfacing on beaches in the UK in forms of congealed blobs known as “fatbergs,” posing a threat to children and especially pet dogs who might accidentally ingest it, according to British media.
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The Scary Thing About a Virus That Kills Farmed Fish

The Scary Thing About a Virus That Kills Farmed Fish | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
In 2005, fishermen pulled out 316 tons of tilapia, a tasty freshwater fish, from the Sea of Galilee in Israel. But four years later, the catch had fallen to just 8 tons. This wasn’t just another story about overfishing, though: Throughout the country, in the summer of 2009, farmed tilapia were also dying en masse.

“Farmers lost 20 to 30 percent of the fish in their ponds, and it was spreading from one pond to the next,” recalls Avi Eldar, a state-employed fish vet, who was called to investigate. The enigmatic die-offs didn’t fit any known parasite, toxin, bacterium, or virus. “We couldn’t diagnose the problem. We suspected that there was a new bug in town.”
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Oil And Gas Companies Won’t Have To Pay For Damage Caused To Louisiana’s Coast, Judge Rules | Katie Valentine | ThinkProgress.org

Oil And Gas Companies Won’t Have To Pay For Damage Caused To Louisiana’s Coast, Judge Rules | Katie Valentine | ThinkProgress.org | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it

Oil and gas companies won’t have to pay for decades of damage to Louisiana’s coast, after a lawsuit filed against the companies in 2013 was thrown out on Friday.

U.S. District Judge Nanette Jolivette Brown dismissed the lawsuit, which was filed by the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East against nearly 100 fossil fuel companies. The suit, which the New York Times called the “most ambitious environmental lawsuit ever,” could have cost the industry billions of dollars for its contribution to the erosion of Louisiana’s coast. The state’s coastline loses about a football field’s worth of land every hour, and the wells drilled by the oil and gas industry have been estimated by the Interior Department to have caused anywhere from 15 to 59 percent of the erosion. The lawsuit would have prompted the industry to help pay for the estimated $50 billion in coastal restoration and protection that Louisiana will need over the next several years.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), who had long opposed the lawsuit and signed a bill last year to quash it — legislation that was later found unconstitutional — praised the judge’s decision, as did the state’s oil and gas industry, which called the lawsuit “ill-conceived, unwise and divisive.”

The oil and gas industry may not be off the hook quite yet, however — the Flood Protection Authority is expected to appeal the judge’s decision to toss out the lawsuit.

Louisiana has lost about 1,900 square miles of land since the 1930s, and the U.S. Geological Survey estimates that the state’s coastal wetlands could disappear in as little as 200 years.

That’s bad news for the state’s coastal communities, which get some protection from storm surge from the wetlands. Sea level rise is likely to exacerbate the land loss problem: coastal Louisiana has seen its sea level rise at a rate that’s roughly double the global rate over the last 50 years.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Alicia Paolercio, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 8, 5:46 PM

If the oil and gas companies did the damage why are they not accountable. If not them them who is accountable to and paying? Why?

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Removal of 4 Dams to Reopen 420 Miles of Historic Salmon Habitat on Klamath River

Removal of 4 Dams to Reopen 420 Miles of Historic Salmon Habitat on Klamath River | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
It’s been 115 years since the first of six dams began regulating flows on the Klamath River, which runs from the high desert of eastern Oregon to the northern California coast.

By 2020 most of them will be gone—and the river’s once-abundant salmon runs hopefully on the rebound—if two new agreements between tribal, state and federal governments, the operator and other stakeholders work out as planned.
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