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Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added)
If no farmland and no forests and no water and no fish - then what?
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Germany’s Largest Utility Gets Out Of The Fossil Fuel Business

Germany’s Largest Utility Gets Out Of The Fossil Fuel Business | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
On Sunday, Germany’s biggest utility E.ON announced plans to split into two companies and focus on renewables in a major shift that could be an indicator of broader changes to come across the utility sector. E.ON will spin off its nuclear, oil, coal, and gas operations in an effort to confront a drastically altered energy market, especially under the pressure of Germany’s Energiewende — the country’s move away from nuclear to renewables. The company told shareholders that it will place “a particular emphasis on expanding its wind business in Europe and in other selected target markets,” and that it will also “strengthen its solar business.”
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Coast Guard, EPA Agree to Analyze How Oil Spill Cleanups May Affect Endangered Species of Hudson River

In response to a lawsuit filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Coast Guard and Environmental Protection Agency have agreed to analyze how oil-spill response actions in the Hudson River and New York Bay may affect endangered wildlife like Atlantic sturgeon and green sea turtles.

“The dramatic rise of crude oil transport along the Hudson River makes a devastating oil spill almost inevitable," said Mollie Matteson, a senior scientist at the Center. “If a spill happens, we shouldn’t add insult to injury by hurting fish, turtles and other endangered wildlife during the cleanup.”
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This Hypnotizing Macro Timelapse Of Exotic Corals Will Take Your Breath Away

This Hypnotizing Macro Timelapse Of Exotic Corals Will Take Your Breath Away | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Daniel Stoupin, a PhD student at the University of Queensland in Australia, has created a stunning must-see video that will open your eyes to just how little most of us understand about the many different forms of life we have here on Earth. His “Slow Life” video combines thousands of close-

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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 28, 10:58 AM

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Daniel Stoupin, a PhD student at the University of Queensland in Australia, has created a stunning must-see video that will open your eyes to just how little most of us understand about the many different forms of life we have here on Earth. His “Slow Life” video combines thousands of close-up photographs of beautiful corals to illustrate their daily movements in a way that makes them seem not of this earth.

Stoupin’s video is an incredible combination of macro, aquatic and time-lapse photography methods the likes of which we’ve never seen before. And that’s because the corals in this video are displayed at speeds that most of us have never seen before. These organisms move too slowly for us to really notice what they do.

Not only are the corals and sponges in these videos governed by many of the same needs we are, they are also hugely important to their ocean environments. If you’re interested in learning more about the organisms in Stoupin’s video and about marine ecosystems, be sure to visit his blog!

“Our brains are wired to comprehend and follow fast and dynamic events better, especially those very few that happen at speeds comparable to ours,” Stoupin explains on his blog.

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Whales Aren’t Keen on Being Flayed Alive By Gulls – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science

Whales Aren’t Keen on Being Flayed Alive By Gulls – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The southern right whale is a huge fortress of animal—50 feet and 60 tons of muscle and blubber. At its size, this giant should have nothing to fear from ocean predators, except possibly for killer...
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Energy Efficiency May Be the Key to Saving Trillions

Energy Efficiency May Be the Key to Saving Trillions | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Compared with eye-catching renewable power technologies like wind turbines and solar panels, energy efficiency is nearly invisible. But advocates say doing more with less power may be an even more critical weapon in the fight against climate change and offers big economic benefits, too.
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World Population Will Soar Higher Than Predicted

World Population Will Soar Higher Than Predicted | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
World population will hit nearly 11 billion by 2100
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Research Suggests UK Honey Bee Parasite Linked to Climate Change | Lab Manager

Research Suggests UK Honey Bee Parasite Linked to Climate Change | Lab Manager | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The gut parasite Nosema ceranae – which originates in Asia but can now be found worldwide – is likely to cause increasing damage to UK bees as the Earth heats up through climate change.

The new finding that this parasite not only has a superior competitive ability, but that its numbers could rise with climate change, has been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Co-author of the study and Adjunct Reader at Queen’s School of Biological Sciences, Professor Robert Paxton said: “This emerging parasite is more susceptible to cold than its original close relative, possibly reflecting its presumed origin in east Asia. In the face of rising global temperatures, our findings suggest that it will increase in prevalence and potentially lead to increased honey bee colony losses in Britain.”
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Panama’s Indigenous People Want to Harness the Riches of Their Forests

Panama’s Indigenous People Want to Harness the Riches of Their Forests | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

"PANAMA CITY, Oct 22 2014 (IPS) - For indigenous people in Panama, the rainforest where they live is not only their habitat but also their spiritual home, and their link to nature and their ancestors. The forest holds part of their essence and their identity.

“Forests are valuable to us because they bring us benefits, but not just oxygen,” Emberá chief Cándido Mezúa, the president of the National Coordinator of Indigenous Peoples of Panama (COONAPIP), told Tierramérica.

“It is organic matter, minerals in the forest floor, forms of life related to the customs of indigenous peoples,” added Mezúa, the seniormost chief of one of Panama’s seven native communities, who live in five collectively-owned indigenous territories or “comarcas”.

In this tropical Central American country, indigenous people manage the forests in their territories through community forestry companies (EFCs). But Mezúa complained about the difficulties in setting up the EFCs, which ends up hurting the forests and the welfare of their guardians, the country’s indigenous communities.

Of Panama’s 3.8 million people, 417,000 are indigenous, and they live on 16,634 sq km – 20 percent of the national territory."


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Lake Chad: almost gone - Vital Water Graphics

Lake Chad: almost gone - Vital Water Graphics | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Straddling the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in West Africa, Lake Chad has been a source of freshwater for irrigation projects in each of (...)
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 30, 4:46 AM

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...........  Since 1963, the lake has shrunk to nearly a twentieth of its original size, due both to climatic changes and to high demands for agricultural water. Since 1963, the surface area of Lake Chad has decreased from approximately 25,000 km2 to 1,350 km2 (Scientific American, 2001).

 

The changes in the lake have contributed to local lack of water, crop failures, livestock deaths, collapsed fisheries, soil salinity, and increasing poverty throughout the region:

 Between June 1966 and January 1973, the surface area of Lake Chad shrunk from 22,772 km2 to 15,400 km2.

 In 1982, the lake’s surface area was estimated to be about 2,276 km2. In February 1994, Meteosat images measured it at just 1,756 km2.

 Between 1953 and 1979, irrigation had only a modest impact on the Lake Chad ecosystem. But between 1983 and 1994 irrigation had increased four-fold.

 About 50% of the decrease in the lake’s size since the 1960s is attributed to human water use, with the remainder attributed to shifting climate patterns.

 Invasive plant species currently cover about 50% of the remaining surface of Lake Chad. Research carried out over the past 40 years indicates that the main factors in the shrinking of the lake have been:

 Major overgrazing in the region (Coe and Foley, 2001), resulting in a loss of vegetation and serious deforestation, contributing to a drier climate.

 Large and unsustainable irrigation projects built by Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon and Chad, which have diverted water from both the lake and the Chari and Logone rivers.

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In Search of the Endangered Snow Leopard

In Search of the Endangered Snow Leopard | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Author Eduard Fischer shares the story of his pursuit of the elusive and endangered snow leopard in the Himalayas.
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This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers

This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The data centers that power the Internet use more energy than the entire country of India. Most of that energy is lost as waste heat. That fact inspired an idea: Why not use a network of servers to heat homes?

Cloud & Heat, a cloud infrastructure company in Germany, stores server cabinets in houses and apartment buildings. While the servers crunch data, the excess heat is used to warm up the homes in the winter and provide hot water all year.

The service has a second major benefit: a huge chunk of the energy used in data centers goes to air conditioning to keep the machines cool. When the servers are distributed in homes instead of a single building, the company can eliminate the need for cooling. That, in turn, saves money and makes the service cheaper for customers.
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Single-cell phytoplankton in the ocean are responsible for roughly half of global oxygen production

Single-cell phytoplankton in the ocean are responsible for roughly half of global oxygen production | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

In a paper published in PNAS on Monday November 24, scientists laid out a robust new framework based on in situ observations that will allow scientists to describe and understand how phytoplankton assimilate limited concentrations of phosphorus, a key nutrient, in the ocean in ways that better reflect what is actually occurring in the marine environment. This is an important advance because nutrient uptake is a central property of ocean biogeochemistry, and in many regions controls carbon dioxide fixation, which ultimately can play a role in mitigating climate change.

 

"Until now, our understanding of how phytoplankton assimilate nutrients in an extremely nutrient-limited environment was based on lab cultures that poorly represented what happens in natural populations," explained Michael Lomas of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, who co-led the study with Adam Martiny of University of California - Irvine, and Simon Levin and Juan Bonachela of Princeton University. "Now we can quantify how phytoplankton are taking up nutrients in the real world, which provides much more meaningful data that will ultimately improve our understanding of their role in global ocean function and climate regulation."

 

To address the knowledge gap about the globally-relevant ecosystem process of nutrient uptake, researchers worked to identify how different levels of microbial biodiversity influenced in situ phosphorus uptake in the Western Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Specifically, they focused on how different phytoplankton taxa assimilated phosphorus in the same region, and how phosphorus uptake by those individual taxa varied across regions with different phosphorus concentrations. They found that phytoplankton were much more efficient at assimilating vanishingly low phosphorus concentrations than would have been predicted from culture research. Moreover, individual phytoplankton continually optimized their ability to assimilate phosphorus as environmental phosphorus concentrations increased. This finding runs counter to the commonly held, and widely used, view that their ability to assimilate phosphorus saturates as concentrations increase.

 

"Prior climate models didn't take into account how natural phytoplankton populations vary in their ability to take up key nutrients, "said Martiny. "We were able to fill in this gap through fieldwork and advanced analytical techniques. The outcome is the first comprehensive in situ quantification of nutrient uptake capabilities among dominant phytoplankton groups in the North Atlantic Ocean that takes into account microbial biodiversity."


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Indonesia cracks down on deforestation in symbolic u-turn

Indonesia cracks down on deforestation in symbolic u-turn | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Indonesia’s new president announces plans to protect rainforest and peatlands, signalling a new direction for country with worst rate of deforestation in the world
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That takeout coffee cup may be messing with your hormones

That takeout coffee cup may be messing with your hormones | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that whole classes of BPA-free plastics—including the kind in styrofoam—release estrogenic chemicals.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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George Shultz Defies GOP in Embrace of Climate Adaptation

George Shultz Defies GOP in Embrace of Climate Adaptation | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
As Ronald Reagan’s secretary of state, George Shultz faced off against Muammar Qaddafi, the Soviet Union and Chinese communists.
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Optimism Faces Grave Realities at Climate Talks

Optimism Faces Grave Realities at Climate Talks | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Even as United Nations negotiators expressed optimism that they may finally achieve an elusive deal, experts caution that it probably will not be enough to stave off the near-term impact of global warming.
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Engineering competition has designs on eliminating Alaska's honey buckets

Engineering competition has designs on eliminating Alaska's honey buckets | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
It is hoped that the Village Safe Water Program will eventually help eliminate dirty sewage lagoons, centralized water transmission lines, and honey buckets -- the 5-gallon buckets still used as toilets by many in the state.

Via Sylvain Rotillon
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Plan Outlines Low-Carbon Future for Germany

Plan Outlines Low-Carbon Future for Germany | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
A computer model developed in Germany that simulates energy supply and demand shows that a push for renewable power sources can be economically viable.

Via Flora Moon
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Can China Cut Coal? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

Can China Cut Coal? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
On a visit to China a few years back, I asked a local official about pollution controls after enjoying my first sour, gritty taste of the country’s air. China’s new coal-fired power plants and other industrial boilers often came equipped with expensive scrubbers to clean acid rain and smog-forming sulfur dioxide out of the hot mix of gases that went up and out the smokestack. But the scrubbers required energy to run, this official noted, and therefore were shut off except on days when dignitaries (or foreign journalists) visited.
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Aquaponics: the potential to produce sustainable food anywhere

Aquaponics: the potential to produce sustainable food anywhere | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Colin Javens believes the marriage between aquaculture and hydroponics, growing fish and plants together, is the future of a sustainable food system

Via Japan Aquaponics, Jocelyn Stoller, Marianne Castiglia
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Not Dealing With Climate Change Endangers More Than the Planet

Not Dealing With Climate Change Endangers More Than the Planet | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
It was a bizarre meeting in a southern Sudanese supply camp a few years ago, when the civil war between north and south Sudan was slowly winding down. My wife and I were having a drink at a crudely constructed bar when another man, American, approached us and asked what we were doing "in this godforsaken place."

There was something different about him -- a keenness and a fulsome awareness of what was happening in that entire region of Africa. He fascinated us with his knowledge and penetrating insights. It was further into the conversation when he finally conceded that he was an American Intelligence officer, attempting to acquire information regarding mass migrations of people looking for food and water.

"What in all the world are you doing here?" I asked sincerely. Hesitating momentarily, he finally said, "We're studying the effects of climate change in this part of the world and what it's going to mean to the future security of the region, and maybe even to America."
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Fracking risk compared to thalidomide and asbestos in Walport report

Fracking risk compared to thalidomide and asbestos in Walport report | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Historic innovations that have been adopted too hastily with grave unforeseen impacts provide cautionary examples for potential side effects of fracking, says report by government’s chief scientist Mark Walport
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Chinese logging company takes over Guyana's forests

Chinese logging company takes over Guyana's forests | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Foreign companies investing in Guyana’s substantial forests are supposed to adhere to national laws and international agreements. But civil society leaders and activists inside and outside the South American country are crying foul, saying foreign corporations and government officials are paying lip service to the accords while quietly building a timber-harvesting empire in the country with few benefits for the average Guyanese.

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Making fuel out of thin air

Making fuel out of thin air | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
In a discovery that experts say could revolutionise fuel cell technology, scientists have found that graphene, the world's thinnest, strongest and most impermeable material, can allow protons to pass through it.

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17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere

17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Climate change is here and it's changing the world around us.

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