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Too Sick to Function

Too Sick to Function | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
As wind and rain erode our nation’s soil, chemicals contaminate waterways and food gets harder to grow.
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Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added)
If no farmland and no forests and no water and no fish - then what?
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Panama’s Indigenous People Want to Harness the Riches of Their Forests

Panama’s Indigenous People Want to Harness the Riches of Their Forests | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

"PANAMA CITY, Oct 22 2014 (IPS) - For indigenous people in Panama, the rainforest where they live is not only their habitat but also their spiritual home, and their link to nature and their ancestors. The forest holds part of their essence and their identity.

“Forests are valuable to us because they bring us benefits, but not just oxygen,” Emberá chief Cándido Mezúa, the president of the National Coordinator of Indigenous Peoples of Panama (COONAPIP), told Tierramérica.

“It is organic matter, minerals in the forest floor, forms of life related to the customs of indigenous peoples,” added Mezúa, the seniormost chief of one of Panama’s seven native communities, who live in five collectively-owned indigenous territories or “comarcas”.

In this tropical Central American country, indigenous people manage the forests in their territories through community forestry companies (EFCs). But Mezúa complained about the difficulties in setting up the EFCs, which ends up hurting the forests and the welfare of their guardians, the country’s indigenous communities.

Of Panama’s 3.8 million people, 417,000 are indigenous, and they live on 16,634 sq km – 20 percent of the national territory."


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Lake Chad: almost gone - Vital Water Graphics

Lake Chad: almost gone - Vital Water Graphics | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Straddling the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in West Africa, Lake Chad has been a source of freshwater for irrigation projects in each of (...)
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In Search of the Endangered Snow Leopard

In Search of the Endangered Snow Leopard | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Author Eduard Fischer shares the story of his pursuit of the elusive and endangered snow leopard in the Himalayas.
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This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers

This German Data Center Wants To Heat Your House With Its Servers | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
The data centers that power the Internet use more energy than the entire country of India. Most of that energy is lost as waste heat. That fact inspired an idea: Why not use a network of servers to heat homes?

Cloud & Heat, a cloud infrastructure company in Germany, stores server cabinets in houses and apartment buildings. While the servers crunch data, the excess heat is used to warm up the homes in the winter and provide hot water all year.

The service has a second major benefit: a huge chunk of the energy used in data centers goes to air conditioning to keep the machines cool. When the servers are distributed in homes instead of a single building, the company can eliminate the need for cooling. That, in turn, saves money and makes the service cheaper for customers.
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Single-cell phytoplankton in the ocean are responsible for roughly half of global oxygen production

Single-cell phytoplankton in the ocean are responsible for roughly half of global oxygen production | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it

In a paper published in PNAS on Monday November 24, scientists laid out a robust new framework based on in situ observations that will allow scientists to describe and understand how phytoplankton assimilate limited concentrations of phosphorus, a key nutrient, in the ocean in ways that better reflect what is actually occurring in the marine environment. This is an important advance because nutrient uptake is a central property of ocean biogeochemistry, and in many regions controls carbon dioxide fixation, which ultimately can play a role in mitigating climate change.

 

"Until now, our understanding of how phytoplankton assimilate nutrients in an extremely nutrient-limited environment was based on lab cultures that poorly represented what happens in natural populations," explained Michael Lomas of Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, who co-led the study with Adam Martiny of University of California - Irvine, and Simon Levin and Juan Bonachela of Princeton University. "Now we can quantify how phytoplankton are taking up nutrients in the real world, which provides much more meaningful data that will ultimately improve our understanding of their role in global ocean function and climate regulation."

 

To address the knowledge gap about the globally-relevant ecosystem process of nutrient uptake, researchers worked to identify how different levels of microbial biodiversity influenced in situ phosphorus uptake in the Western Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Specifically, they focused on how different phytoplankton taxa assimilated phosphorus in the same region, and how phosphorus uptake by those individual taxa varied across regions with different phosphorus concentrations. They found that phytoplankton were much more efficient at assimilating vanishingly low phosphorus concentrations than would have been predicted from culture research. Moreover, individual phytoplankton continually optimized their ability to assimilate phosphorus as environmental phosphorus concentrations increased. This finding runs counter to the commonly held, and widely used, view that their ability to assimilate phosphorus saturates as concentrations increase.

 

"Prior climate models didn't take into account how natural phytoplankton populations vary in their ability to take up key nutrients, "said Martiny. "We were able to fill in this gap through fieldwork and advanced analytical techniques. The outcome is the first comprehensive in situ quantification of nutrient uptake capabilities among dominant phytoplankton groups in the North Atlantic Ocean that takes into account microbial biodiversity."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Mariaschnee
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Indonesia cracks down on deforestation in symbolic u-turn

Indonesia cracks down on deforestation in symbolic u-turn | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Indonesia’s new president announces plans to protect rainforest and peatlands, signalling a new direction for country with worst rate of deforestation in the world
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Mirrors could replace air conditioning by beaming heat into space

Mirrors could replace air conditioning by beaming heat into space | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Researchers have created a mirror that not only reflects 97% of light but also radiates heat into the cold depths of the universe
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Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in

Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies hold the promise of helping resource managers predict, avoid, and reverse the tipping points that lead to degraded habitats, economic losses, and social upheaval.

Via Mariaschnee
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Ten ways remote sensing can contribute to conservation

Ten ways remote sensing can contribute to conservation | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Scientists from the WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), NASA, and other organizations have partnered to focus global attention on the contribution of satellites to biodiversity conservation in a recently released study entitled "Ten Ways Remote...

Via Mariaschnee
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Scientist gets more support to study Deepwater Horizon spill impact on coast

Scientist gets more support to study Deepwater Horizon spill impact on coast | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Since the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded in 2010, Annette Engel has been traveling the coastline by boat and foot, taking samples to study how the oil has changed the coastal ecosystems.

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These Incredible Tiny Islands Suck Pollution Out of Water

These Incredible Tiny Islands Suck Pollution Out of Water | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
A Scottish company is building floating ecosystems to clean up rivers and lakes.

Via Mariaschnee
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 26, 10:36 AM

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*****  Vidéo *****

 

...............  The islands look and work like wetlands. Man-made structures hold together their vegetation; the pollutant-sucking process works naturally. Roots suspended beneath the islands promote the growth of aquatic biofilm (the green slime you find on rocks) that “cleanse[s] the water through the breakdown, sorption, and metabolic transformation of nutrients and impurities,” explains the Biomatrix website.

 

Treatment plants have used biofilm filters for decades, reports Fast Company. But the company’s engineering additions, such as columns of synthetic fiber, maximize the growth of the beneficial bacteria that absorbs pollutants.

Ahoefa Nathalie Agbagla's curator insight, November 28, 8:40 AM

Des écosystèmes flottants créés par la société écossaise Biomatrix Water

Les biofilms qui se développent grâce au système racinaire de ces ilôts dépolluent l'eau.

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Despite Persecution, Guardian of Lake Tai Spotlights China’s Polluters

Despite Persecution, Guardian of Lake Tai Spotlights China’s Polluters | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Despite pressure from Beijing, factories continue to dump toxic waste into waterways because the cost of violating the rules is lower than the cost of compliance.

Via SustainOurEarth, Sylvain Rotillon
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 25, 4:17 AM

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“Some progress has been made, but we haven’t yet reached a turning point,” said Ma Jun, one of the country’s leading environmentalists. “For many factories, the cost of violating the rules is lower than the cost of compliance.”

 

Also unchanged is the persecution of Mr. Wu, 46, a scrappy, self-taught environmentalist who spent three years in jail on what he said were trumped-up fraud charges — punishment, he said, for his dogged campaign against the factory owners and their local government allies, whom he blames for despoiling the lake.

Since emerging from prison in 2010, Mr. Wu has continued his advocacy work, prompting a predictable response from the authorities. He is subjected to periods of confinement at his home in Zhoutie, a village on Lake Tai. His cellphone is monitored by the police and he is barred from traveling beyond Yixing, the township in eastern Jiangsu Province that includes Zhoutie.

Plainclothes police officers often accompany him on shopping excursions, and surveillance cameras line the narrow road to his home. Vengeful officials, he said, have even stymied his efforts to find a job by warning away would-be employers. “If it wasn’t for the garden in front of my house, I’d probably starve,” said Mr. Wu, a short, pudgy-faced man who often sounds like he is shouting, even when indoors.

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But environmentalists say there is reason for hope. In April, the central government revised the nation’s environmental law for the first time since 1989, imposing steep fines on polluters and requiring companies to disclose pollution data. The regulations, which take effect in January, will also allow environmental groups to file public interest lawsuits against factories that break the law.

Mr. Ma, the environmentalist, said the new measures include important tools for cleaning up Lake Tai and other ailing bodies of water, but the key would be enforcement. “All it takes is the mayor or the head of a county saying, ‘You can’t touch this factory. It’s too important to the local economy,’ ” he said.

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Aquaponics: the potential to produce sustainable food anywhere

Aquaponics: the potential to produce sustainable food anywhere | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Colin Javens believes the marriage between aquaculture and hydroponics, growing fish and plants together, is the future of a sustainable food system

Via Japan Aquaponics, Jocelyn Stoller, Marianne Castiglia
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Not Dealing With Climate Change Endangers More Than the Planet

Not Dealing With Climate Change Endangers More Than the Planet | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
It was a bizarre meeting in a southern Sudanese supply camp a few years ago, when the civil war between north and south Sudan was slowly winding down. My wife and I were having a drink at a crudely constructed bar when another man, American, approached us and asked what we were doing "in this godforsaken place."

There was something different about him -- a keenness and a fulsome awareness of what was happening in that entire region of Africa. He fascinated us with his knowledge and penetrating insights. It was further into the conversation when he finally conceded that he was an American Intelligence officer, attempting to acquire information regarding mass migrations of people looking for food and water.

"What in all the world are you doing here?" I asked sincerely. Hesitating momentarily, he finally said, "We're studying the effects of climate change in this part of the world and what it's going to mean to the future security of the region, and maybe even to America."
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Fracking risk compared to thalidomide and asbestos in Walport report

Fracking risk compared to thalidomide and asbestos in Walport report | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Historic innovations that have been adopted too hastily with grave unforeseen impacts provide cautionary examples for potential side effects of fracking, says report by government’s chief scientist Mark Walport
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Chinese logging company takes over Guyana's forests

Chinese logging company takes over Guyana's forests | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Foreign companies investing in Guyana’s substantial forests are supposed to adhere to national laws and international agreements. But civil society leaders and activists inside and outside the South American country are crying foul, saying foreign corporations and government officials are paying lip service to the accords while quietly building a timber-harvesting empire in the country with few benefits for the average Guyanese.

Via TheNaturalist
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Making fuel out of thin air

Making fuel out of thin air | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
In a discovery that experts say could revolutionise fuel cell technology, scientists have found that graphene, the world's thinnest, strongest and most impermeable material, can allow protons to pass through it.

Via Mariaschnee
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17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere

17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Climate change is here and it's changing the world around us.

Via Mariaschnee
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Fishermen in Brazil Save a River Goliath, and Their Livelihoods

Fishermen in Brazil Save a River Goliath, and Their Livelihoods | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Efforts to save the pirarucu, one of the world’s largest freshwater fish, have been a success while offering a strategy for fending off a broader freshwater extinction crisis.
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Wildforests's curator insight, November 27, 9:38 AM

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More than 1,400 fishermen in and around Mamirauá take part in the pirarucu management regime, hewing to quotas and tagging each fish they catch. Fishermen in 2013 took home an average of about $650 each from pirarucu fishing, a welcome sum in far-flung villages. Still, illegal pirarucu fishing flourishes in parts of the Amazon, lowering prices for the fish in street markets.

 

While fisheries experts are generally encouraged by projects that have recovered badly overexploited pirarucu populations in some pockets of the rain forest, the illicit trade, especially in the neighboring state of Pará, has caused the megafish to disappear near large cities while threatening its survival in some forest settlements.

“We’re hoping the pirarucu can withstand such challenges, since a die-off would rob villages across the Amazon of their lifeblood,” said Claudio Batalha, 47, a coordinator of the fishing project here. “Without making such fishing sustainable, more outsiders could claim the forest as their own,” he added. “That’s when the threat of greater forest devastation gets real.”

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Ontario First Province To Crack Down On Pesticides Linked To Mass Die-Off Of Bees

Ontario First Province To Crack Down On Pesticides Linked To Mass Die-Off Of Bees | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Ontario has become the first province or state in North America to severely restrict a class of pesticides linked to collapses in bee populations.

The province said on Tuesday it plans to reduce the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on corn and soyb...
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The Genesis of a Bird Rescue

The Genesis of a Bird Rescue | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
One injured dove leads to the inception of the bird rescue that became Pandemonium Aviaries, now one of the largest bird sanctuaries and rare breeding facilities in the country.
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Avoiding ecosystem collapse

Avoiding ecosystem collapse | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies published in the ...

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Primates indispensable for regeneration of tropical forests

Primates indispensable for regeneration of tropical forests | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Primatologist and plant geneticists have studied the dispersal of tree seeds by New World primates. Primates can influence seed dispersal and spatial genetic kinship structure of plants that serve as their food source.

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Acid Maps Reveal Worst of Climate Change | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

Acid Maps Reveal Worst of Climate Change | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Farming, Forests, Water & Fishing (No Petroleum Added) | Scoop.it
Much of the change in climate change is happening to the ocean. It’s not just the extra heat hiding within the waves. The seven seas also absorb a big share of the carbon dioxide released by burning the fossilized sunshine known as coal, natural gas and oil. All those billions and billions of CO2 molecules interact with the brine to make it ever so slightly more acidic over time and, as more and more CO2 gets absorbed, the oceans become more acidic.
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Time to move ahead on removal of Ballville Dam - Port Clinton News Herald

Time to move ahead on removal of Ballville Dam
Port Clinton News Herald
For decades, council members, residents and officials have weighed in on whether the Ballville Dam should be removed or repaired.

Via Ryan Roberts
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