Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment
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Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment
If no farmland and no forests and no water and no fish - then what?
Curated by pdeppisch
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High fishery catches through trophic cascades in China

Fishing marine ecosystems indiscriminately and intensely can have negative impacts on biodiversity, but it may increase the biomass of fish available for capture in the system. We explore the possibility that China’s high fishery catches are a result of predator removal using an ecosystem model of the East China Sea (ECS). We show that China’s high fishery catches can be explained by the removal of larger predatory fish and consequent increases in the production of smaller fish. We project that single-species management would decrease catches in the ECS by reversing these ecosystem effects. Fisheries similar to those in China produce a large fraction of global catch; management reform in these areas must consider the entire ecosystem, rather than individual species.

Via Samir, Complexity Digest
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Helping Fishermen Catch What They Want, and Nothing Else

Helping Fishermen Catch What They Want, and Nothing Else | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
It's the holy grail of commercial fishing: catch just the right amount of just the right size of just the right species, without damage to the physical

Via PIRatE Lab
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, May 4, 2016 1:37 PM
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Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland

Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
New England cod are now so depleted, Americans may need to learn to love a more plentiful fish.

Via PIRatE Lab
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, January 2, 2014 11:35 AM

This whole story seems to have played out in slow motion from my perspective.  Everything from the complaints from the wives of fishermen, the failure of Glouster fishermen to embrace a collective vision for management, etc., etc.

 

I recall discussions in the 1980s where this exact scenario that is before us was discussed.  It has been a fantastic lesson in the need for more effective communication and a realization that we can't always save ourselves from ourselves.  For those unawares, I suggest a great read Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World.

 

Enjoy the Maine (American) lobster catches while you can, New England.  The energy and material flows that once bolstered these now nuked cod populations appears to have switched to now bolstering that "golden trap" of a fishery.  Not a very bright future for our fishing families and working ports/harbors.

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Butterfish is a big problem for little puffins

Butterfish is a big problem for little puffins | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
Warmer seas have attracted a new fish to the Maine coast – but puffin chicks can’t stomach it

Via PIRatE Lab
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How satellite technology is helping to fight illegal fishing

How satellite technology is helping to fight illegal fishing | Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment | Scoop.it
A new initiative is arming coastguards with satellite intelligence that allows them to target their search for pirate fishing vessels in remote marine areas

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, PIRatE Lab
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, February 13, 2016 12:06 PM

Another nice blurb on the increasing use of technology to assist with monitoring the "unmonitorable" high seas.